Colorado House of Representatives

Last updated

Colorado House of Representatives
73rd Colorado General Assembly
Seal of Colorado.svg
Type
Type
Term limits
4 terms (8 years)
History
Preceded by72nd Colorado General Assembly
New session started
January 13, 2021
Leadership
Alec Garnett (D)
since January 13, 2021
Speaker pro Tempore
Adrienne Benavidez (D)
since January 13, 2021
Majority Leader
Daneya Esgar (D)
since January 13, 2021
Minority Leader
Hugh McKean (R)
since January 13, 2021
Structure
Seats65
2019 Colorado House or Representatives.svg
Political groups
Majority
  •    Democratic (41)

Minority

Length of term
2 years
AuthorityArticle V, Colorado Constitution
Salary$30,000/year + per diem
Elections
First-past-the-post
Last election
November 3, 2020
(65 seats)
Next election
November 8, 2022
(65 seats)
RedistrictingColorado Reapportionment Commission
Meeting place
ColoradoStateCapitolHouseOfRepresentatives gobeirne.jpg
House of Representatives Chamber
Colorado State Capitol, Denver
Website
Colorado General Assembly

Coordinates: 39°44′21″N104°59′05″W / 39.7392°N 104.9848°W / 39.7392; -104.9848

Contents

The Colorado House of Representatives is the lower house of the Colorado General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Colorado. The House is composed of 65 members from an equal number of constituent districts, with each district having 75,000 people. Representatives are elected to two-year terms, and are limited to four consecutive terms in office but can run again after a two-year respite.

The Colorado House of Representatives convenes at the State Capitol building in Denver.

Committees

Current committees include: [1]

Current composition

4124
DemocraticRepublican
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
68th General Assembly3233650
69th General Assembly3728650
70th General Assembly3431650
Begin 71st Assembly3728650
End 71st Assembly3629650
72nd General Assembly4124650
Begin 73rd Assembly4124650
Latest voting share

Leaders

PositionNamePartyResidenceDistrict
Speaker of the House Alec Garnett Democratic Denver 2
Speaker pro Tempore Adrienne Benavidez Democratic Adams County 32
Majority Leader Daneya Esgar Democratic Pueblo 46
Assistant Majority Leader Serena Gonzales-Gutierrez Democratic Denver 4
Majority Caucus co-Chair Meg Froelich Democratic Greenwood Village 3
Majority Caucus co-Chair Lisa Cutter Democratic Jefferson County 25
co-Majority Whip Monica Duran Democratic Wheat Ridge 24
co-Majority Whip Kyle Mullica Democratic Northglenn 34
Assistant Majority Caucus Chair Dafna Michaelson Jenet Democratic Commerce City 30
Minority Leader Hugh McKean Republican Loveland 51
Assistant Minority Leader Tim Geitner Republican Falcon 19
Minority Caucus Chair Janice Rich Republican Grand Junction 55
Minority Whip Rod Pelton Republican Cheyenne Wells 65

Members

[2]

DistrictRepresentativePartyResidence
1 Susan Lontine Democratic Denver
2 Alec Garnett DemocraticDenver
3 Meg Froelich Democratic Greenwood Village
4 Serena Gonzales-Gutierrez DemocraticDenver
5 Alex Valdez DemocraticDenver
6 Steven Woodrow DemocraticDenver
7 Jennifer Bacon DemocraticDenver
8 Leslie Herod DemocraticDenver
9 Emily Sirota DemocraticDenver
10 Edie Hooton Democratic Boulder
11 Karen McCormick Democratic Hygiene
12 Tracey Bernett Democratic Boulder
13 Judy Amabile Democratic Boulder
14 Shane Sandridge Republican Colorado Springs
15 Dave Williams RepublicanColorado Springs
16 Andres G. Pico Republican Colorado Springs
17 Tony Exum Democratic Colorado Springs
18 Marc Snyder Democratic Colorado Springs
19 Tim Geitner Republican Falcon
20 Terri Carver RepublicanColorado Springs
21 Mary Bradfield Republican Colorado Springs
22 Colin Larson Republican Littleton
23 Christopher Kennedy Democratic Lakewood
24 Monica Duran Democratic Wheat Ridge
25 Lisa Cutter Democratic Evergreen
26 Dylan Roberts Democratic Eagle
27 Brianna Titone Democratic Arvada
28 Kerry Tipper Democratic Lakewood
29 Lindsey Daugherty Democratic Arvada
30 Dafna Michaelson Jenet Democratic Commerce City
31 Yadira Caraveo Democratic Thornton
32 Adrienne Benavidez Democratic Commerce City
33 Matt Gray Democratic Broomfield
34 Kyle Mullica Democratic Northglenn
35 Shannon Bird Democratic Westminster
36 Mike Weissman Democratic Aurora
37 Tom Sullivan Democratic Centennial
38 David Ortiz Democratic Centennial
39 Mark Baisley RepublicanLittleton
40 Naquetta Ricks Democratic Aurora
41 Iman Jodeh Democratic Aurora
42 Dominique Jackson Democratic Aurora
43 Kevin Van Winkle Republican Highlands Ranch
44 Kim Ransom Republican Parker
45 Patrick Neville Republican Castle Rock
46 Daneya Esgar Democratic Pueblo
47 Stephanie Luck Republican Penrose
48 Tonya Van Beber Republican Weld County
49 Mike Lynch Republican Wellington
50 Mary Young Democratic Greeley
51 Hugh McKean RepublicanLoveland
52 Cathy Kipp Democratic Fort Collins
53 Jennifer Arndt Democratic Fort Collins
54 Matt Soper Republican Delta
55 Janice Rich RepublicanGrand Junction
56 Rod Bockenfeld Republican Henderson
57 Perry Will Republican New Castle
58 Marc Catlin Republican Montrose
59 Barbara McLachlan Democratic Durango
60 Ron Hanks Republican Penrose
61 Julie McCluskie Democratic Dillon
62 Donald Valdez DemocraticAlamosa
63 Dan Woog Republican Erie
64 Richard Holtorf Republican Akron
65 Rod Pelton Republican Cheyenne Wells

Past composition of the House of Representatives

See also

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References

  1. "Committees". Colorado General Assembly, First Regular Session, 73rd General Assembly. State of Colorado. 2021. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  2. "Legislators". Colorado General Assembly. Retrieved January 8, 2019.