South Dakota Senate

Last updated
South Dakota State Senate
South Dakota State Legislature
SouthDakota-StateSeal.svg
Type
Type
Term limits
4 terms (8 years)
History
New session started
January 14, 2020
Leadership
Larry Rhoden (R)
since January 5, 2019
Brock Greenfield (R)
since January 10, 2017
Majority Leader
Kris Langer (R)
since January 8, 2019
Minority Leader
Troy Heinert (D)
since January 8, 2019
Structure
Seats35
South Dakota State Senate Diagram (30 Republicans, 5 Democrats).svg
Political groups
Majority party
  •    Republican (30)

Minority party

Length of term
2 years
AuthorityArticle III, South Dakota Constitution
Salary$6,000/session + $142 per legislative day
Elections
Last election
November 6, 2018
(35 seats)
Next election
November 3, 2020
(35 seats)
RedistrictingLegislative Control
Meeting place
South Dakota Senate Chamber.jpg
State Senate Chamber
South Dakota State Capitol
Pierre, South Dakota
Website
South Dakota State Legislature

The Senate is the upper house of the South Dakota State Legislature. It is made up of 35 members, one representing each legislative district, and meets at the South Dakota State Capitol in Pierre.

Contents

Composition

92nd Legislature (2019)
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic
91st Legislature29635
92nd Legislature30535
Latest voting share

Officers

PositionNamePartyDistrict
President Pro Tem of the Senate Brock Greenfield Republican2
Majority Leader Kris Langer Republican25
Assistant Majority Leader Jim Bolin Republican16
Majority Whips Bob Ewing Republican31
Joshua Klumb Republican20
Al Novstrup Republican3
Jordan Youngberg Republican8
Minority Leader Troy Heinert Democratic26
Assistant Minority Leader Craig Kennedy Democratic18
Minority Whip Reynold Nesiba Democratic15

Members of the 92nd Senate

DistrictSenatorPartyResidence
1 Susan Wismer Democratic Britton
2 Brock Greenfield Republican Clark
3 Al Novstrup Republican Aberdeen
4 John Wiik Republican Big Stone City
5 Lee Schoenbeck Republican Watertown
6 Ernie Otten Republican Tea
7 V. J. Smith Republican Brookings
8 Casey Crabtree Republican Madison
9 Wayne Steinhauer Republican Hartford
10 Margaret Sutton Republican Sioux Falls
11 Jim Stalzer Republican Sioux Falls
12 Blake Curd Republican Sioux Falls
13 Jack Kolbeck Republican Sioux Falls
14 Deb Soholt Republican Sioux Falls
15 Reynold Nesiba Democratic Sioux Falls
16 Jim Bolin Republican Canton
17 Arthur Rusch Republican Vermillion
18 Craig Kennedy Democratic Yankton
19 Kyle Schoenfish Republican Scotland
20 Joshua Klumb Republican Mount Vernon
21 Rocky Blare Republican Ideal
22 Jim White Republican Huron
23 John A. Lake Republican Gettysburg
24 Jeff Monroe Republican Pierre
25 Kris Langer Republican Dell Rapids
26 Troy Heinert Democratic Mission
27 Red Dawn Foster Democratic Pine Ridge
28 Ryan Maher Republican Isabel
29 Gary Cammack Republican Union Center
30 Lance Russell Republican Hot Springs
31 Bob Ewing Republican Spearfish
32 Helene Duhamel Republican Rapid City
33 Phil Jensen Republican Rapid City
34 Jeffrey Partridge Republican Rapid City
35 Jessica Castleberry Republican Rapid City

Past composition of the Senate

See also

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