List of United States state legislatures

Last updated
US state legislatures by party control
Democratic control
Republican control
Split, Democratic - Republican
Control to be confirmed US State Government Control Map.svg
US state legislatures by party control
  Democratic control
  Republican control
  Split, Democratic – Republican
  Control to be confirmed
US state governments (governor and legislature) by party control
Democratic control
Republican control
Split control US state Legislature and Governor Control.svg
US state governments (governor and legislature) by party control
  Democratic control
  Republican control
  Split control

This is a list of United States state legislatures. Each state in the United States has a legislature as part of its form of civil government. Most of the fundamental details of the legislature are specified in the state constitution. With the exception of Nebraska, all state legislatures are bicameral bodies, composed of a lower house (Assembly, General Assembly, State Assembly, House of Delegates, or House of Representatives) and an upper house (Senate). The United States also has one federal district and five non-state territories with local legislative branches, which are also listed below. Among the states, the Nebraska Legislature is the only state with a unicameral body. However, three other territories the District of Columbia, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands also have unicameral bodies.

Contents

The exact names, dates, term lengths, term limits, electoral systems, electoral districts, and other details are determined by the individual states' laws.

Party summary

Party Control of Legislatures

Republican-controlled legislatures29
Democratic-controlled legislatures19
Split legislatures [1] 2
Total50

Note: A party with a numerical majority in a chamber may be forced to share power with other parties due to informal coalitions or may cede power outright because of divisions within its caucus.

Party Control of State Governments

Republican-controlled governments21
Democratic-controlled governments15
Democratic governor/Republican-controlled legislature8
Republican governor/Democratic-controlled legislature4
Democratic governor/Split legislature1
Republican governor/Split legislature1
Total50

Statistics

State legislators by party

As of June 30,2019

Diagram of all seats in the house. Statehouseparty.svg
Diagram of all seats in the house.
PartyLower house [2] Upper house [3] Total
Republican (R)2,772 (1,080 (3,853 (
Democratic (D)2,579 (874 (3,454 (
Independent (I)18 (3 (21 (
Progressive [VT] (P)7 (2 (9 (
Libertarian (L)1 (0 (1 (
Independence (IP)1 (0 (1 (
Vacant33 (12 (45 (

Includes legislators who are listed officially as unaffiliated, unenrolled, nonpartisan, etc.

State legislatures


As of August 8,2019 [4]
StateState ExecutiveLegislature NameLower houseUpper house
NameParty strengthTerm
(yrs.)
NameParty strengthTerm
(yrs.)
Alabama Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 77–284 State Senate R 27–84
Alaska Governor Legislature House of Representatives Coalition 23 (15D, 6R, 2 ind)–17R2 Senate R 13–74
Arizona Governor State Legislature House of Representatives R 31-292 Senate R 17–132
Arkansas Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 76–242 Senate R 26–94
California Governor State Legislature [nb 1] State Assembly D 61–192 State Senate D 29–114
Colorado Governor General Assembly House of Representatives D 41–242 Senate D 19–164
Connecticut Governor General Assembly House of Representatives D 91–602 Senate D 22–142
Delaware Governor General Assembly House of Representatives D 26–152 Senate D 12–94
Florida Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 73–472 Senate R 23–174
Georgia Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 105–752 State Senate R 35–212
Hawaii Governor State Legislature House of Representatives D 46–52 Senate D 24–14
Idaho Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 56–142 Senate R 28–72
Illinois Governor General Assembly House of Representatives D 74–442 Senate D 39–192 or 4
Indiana Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 67–332 Senate R 40–104
Iowa Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 53–472 Senate R 32–184
Kansas Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 84–412 Senate R 28–11, 1 ind4
Kentucky Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 61–392 Senate R 29–94
Louisiana Governor State Legislature [nb 2] House of Representatives R 68–35, 2 ind4 State Senate R 27–124
Maine Governor Legislature House of Representatives D 87–56, 6 ind, 2 vac2 Senate D 21–142
Maryland Governor General Assembly House of Delegates D 99–424 Senate D 33–144
Massachusetts Governor General Court House of Representatives D 127–32, 1 ind2 Senate D 34–62
Michigan Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 58–522 Senate R 22–164
Minnesota Governor Legislature House of Representatives D 75–55, 4 New Rep2 Senate R 35–322, 4, 4
Mississippi Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 75–46, 1 Ind.4 State Senate R 36-164
Missouri Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 116–472 Senate R 24–104
Montana Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 58–422 Senate R 30–204
Nebraska Governor Legislature Legislature [nb 3] R 30–18, 1 ind4
Nevada Governor Legislature Assembly D 29–132 Senate D 13–84
New Hampshire Governor General Court House of Representatives D 233–165, 1 L2 Senate D 14–102
New Jersey Governor Legislature General Assembly D 52–282 Senate D 24–162, 4, 4
New Mexico Governor Legislature House of Representatives D 46–242 Senate D 26–164
New York Governor [Unnamed] State Assembly D 106–43, 1 IP2 State Senate D 40–232
North Carolina Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 65–552 Senate R 29–212
North Dakota Governor Legislative Assembly House of Representatives R 79–164 Senate R 38–94
Ohio Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 61–382 Senate R 24–94
Oklahoma Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 77–242 Senate R 39–94
Oregon Governor Legislative Assembly House of Representatives D 38–222 State Senate D 19–114
Pennsylvania Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 110–932 State Senate R 28–224
Rhode Island Governor General Assembly House of Representatives D 66–92 Senate D 33–42
South Carolina Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 80–442 Senate R 27–194
South Dakota Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 59–112 Senate R 29–62
Tennessee Governor General Assembly House of Representatives R 73–262 Senate R 26–5, 1 ind, 1 vac4
Texas Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 83–672 Senate R 19–124
Utah Governor State Legislature [nb 4] House of Representatives R 59–162 Senate R 23–64
Vermont Governor General Assembly House of Representatives D 95–43, 7 P, 5 ind2 Senate D 22–6, 2 P2
Virginia Governor General Assembly House of Delegates D 55–452 Senate D 21–194
Washington Governor State Legislature [nb 5] House of Representatives D 57–412 State Senate D 28–21 (20 R, 1 D)4
West Virginia Governor Legislature House of Delegates R 59–412 Senate R 20–144
Wisconsin Governor Legislature State Assembly R 63–362 State Senate R 19–144
Wyoming Governor Legislature House of Representatives R 50–9, 1 Ind2 Senate R 27–34

Federal district and territorial legislatures

Federal district
or territory
GovernorNameLower houseUpper house
NameParty strengthTerm
(years)
NameParty strengthTerm
(years)
American Samoa Governor Fono House of Representatives Nonpartisan 20 + 1 nonvoting delegate2 Senate Nonpartisan 184
District of Columbia Mayor Council --- Council (unicameral)D 11–0, 2 I4
Guam Governor Legislature --- Legislature (unicameral)D 9–62
Northern Mariana Islands Governor Commonwealth Legislature House of Representatives R 14–0, 6 I2 Senate R 7–0, 2 I4
Puerto Rico Governor Legislative Assembly House of Representatives PNP 34–16, 1 PIP [nb 6] 4 Senate PNP 21–4, 1 PIP, 1 I4
US Virgin Islands Governor Legislature --- Legislature (unicameral)D 13–0, 2 I2
New Progressive (PNP) legislators55
Democratic (D) legislators31
Republican (R) legislators27
Popular Democratic (PPD) legislators20
Puerto Rican Independence (PIP) legislators2
Independent Citizens Movement (ICM) legislators1
Independent and nonpartisan (I) legislators52
Non-voting delegate (Swains Island)1
Total189

Notes

  1. The Constitution of California names it the "California Legislature", but the Legislature brands itself as the “California State Legislature”.
  2. The Constitution of Louisiana vests legislative authority in "a legislature, consisting of a Senate and a House of Representatives," and refers to it as "the legislature" throughout, without officially designating a term for the two houses together. However, the two bodies do use the term "Louisiana State Legislature" in official references to itself.
  3. When Nebraska switched to a unicameral legislature in 1937, the lower house was abolished. All current Nebraskan legislators are referred to as “Senators”, as the pre-1937 senate was the retained house.
  4. The Constitution of Utah names it the "Legislature of the State of Utah", but the Legislature brands itself as the "Utah State Legislature".
  5. The Constitution of Washington names it "the legislature of the state of Washington", but the Legislature brands itself as the "Washington State Legislature".
  6. The ruling parties of Puerto Rico are separate from the Republican and Democratic parties.

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. “Split” in the sense that each of the two chambers are controlled by a different party (e.g., a Democratic Senate and Republican House) or one chamber is evenly split between parties (and thus "hung". The Nebraska legislature, though officially nonpartisan, is de facto Republican-controlled, and listed as such.
  2. "Partisan composition of state houses". Ballotpedia. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  3. "Partisan composition of state senates". Ballotpedia. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  4. "Partisan Composition of State Legislatures". Ballotpedia.