Lower house

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A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house. [1] Despite its official position "below" the upper house, in many legislatures worldwide, the lower house has come to wield more power or otherwise exert significant political influence. The lower house typically is the larger of the two chambers, i.e. its members are more numerous.

Contents

Common attributes

House of Commons (United Kingdom) House of Commons Chamber 1.png
House of Commons (United Kingdom)

In comparison with the upper house, lower houses frequently display certain characteristics (though they vary per jurisdiction).

Powers
Status of lower house

The government of the day is usually required to present its budget to the lower house, which must approve the budget. It is a widespread practice for revenue (i.e., appropriation) bills to originate in the lower house. A notable exception to this is the West Virginia House of Delegates, which allows revenue bills to originate from either house. [2]

Titles of lower houses

Australian House of Representatives Australian House of Representatives - Parliament of Australia.jpg
Australian House of Representatives

Many lower houses are named in manners such as these:

See also

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References

  1. Bicameralism (1997) by George Tsebelis.
  2. "West Virginia Constitution". www.wvlegislature.gov. Retrieved 2021-02-22.