Office of Intelligence and Analysis (Treasury Department)

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The Office of Intelligence and Analysis is a part of the Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, [1] of the United States Department of the Treasury and is responsible for the receipt, analysis, collation, and dissemination of foreign intelligence and foreign counterintelligence information related to the operation and responsibilities of the Department of the Treasury. [2]

Contents

History

In 1961, the Department established its first foreign intelligence capability, the Office of National Security (ONS), which was charged by Treasury Secretary Douglas Dillon to connect the Treasury Department with the broader efforts of the National Security Council. In 1977, ONS was overhauled and renamed the Office of Intelligence Support (OIS) by Treasury Secretary Michael Blumenthal and Treasury's place in the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) formalized on December 4th 1981, under Executive Order 12333, United States Intelligence Activities, by President Ronald Reagan. Finally, in late 2003, Treasury's intelligence mission and needs were recognized in the Intelligence Authorization Act of 2004 (31 U.S.C. sec. 312), which established OIA. [3]

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References

  1. "Our Strength Lies in Who We Are". Intelegince.gov. Retrieved 18 December 2014.
  2. "Office of Intelligence and Analysis (OIA) Definition". US legal.com. Retrieved 18 December 2014.
  3. "STRATEGIC DIRECTION: FISCAL YEARS 2012-2015" (PDF). US Treasury. Retrieved 18 December 2014.