NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps
NOAA Commissioned Corps.png
Seal of the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps
Founded1970;49 years ago (1970)
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
Type Uniformed service
Size379 officers [1]
16 ships, 10 aircraft [2]
Part ofNOAA Flag.svg NOAA
Garrison/HQ Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.
Nickname(s)"NOAA Corps"
Motto(s)"Science, service, stewardship." [3]
Colors         Blue and white [ citation needed ]
March"Into the Oceans and the Air"

Loudspeaker.svg Play  

(formerly "Forward with NOAA" [4] )
Engagements World War I [5]
World War II [5]
Cold War
Commanders
Director, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps [6] RADM Michael J. Silah
Deputy Director, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps [7] RDML Nancy Hann
Director, Office of Coast Survey [8] RDML Shepard M. Smith
Notable
commanders
COL Ernest Lester Jones
RADM Raymond Stanton Patton
VADM H. Arnold Karo
RADM William L. Stubblefield
RADM Evelyn J. Fields
RADM Samuel P. De Bow, Jr.
VADM Michael S. Devany
Insignia
Flag
Flag of the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps.svg
Aircraft flown
Reconnaissance WP-3D, AC-695A, G-IV, DHC-6
The seal of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, in which the NOAA Corps originated as the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps in 1917. U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey emblem.jpg
The seal of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, in which the NOAA Corps originated as the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps in 1917.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, known informally as the NOAA Corps, is one of seven federal uniformed services of the United States, and operates under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a scientific agency overseen by the Department of Commerce. The NOAA Corps is made up of scientifically and technically trained officers and is the smallest of the U.S. uniformed services. It is one of only two––the other being the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps––that consists only of commissioned officers, with no enlisted or warrant officer ranks.

The United States of America has seven federal uniformed services that commission officers as defined by Title 10 and subsequently structured and organized by Title 10, Title 14, Title 32 and Title 42 of the United States Code.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US government scientific agency

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is an American scientific agency within the United States Department of Commerce that focuses on the conditions of the oceans, major waterways, and the atmosphere.

United States Department of Commerce United States federal government executive department

In the United States, the Department of Commerce is an executive department of the federal government concerned with promoting economic growth. Among its tasks are gathering economic and demographic data for business and government decision-making, and helping to set industrial standards. This organization's main purpose is to create jobs, promote economic growth, encourage sustainable development and block harmful trade practices of other nations. The Department of Commerce headquarters is the Herbert C. Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Wilbur Ross is the current Commerce secretary.

Contents

The NOAA Corps was established in 1970, though its origins in its predecessor organizations date back to 22 May 1917. [9] [10] [11] It is the successor to the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps (1917–1965) and the United States Environmental Science Services Administration Commissioned Officer Corps (ESSA Corps) (1965–1970).

Mission

The NOAA Corps is the smallest [12] of the seven uniformed services of the United States Government. [note 1] It has over 300 commissioned officers, but no enlisted or warrant officer personnel. The NOAA Corps today provides a cadre of professionals trained in engineering, earth sciences, oceanography, meteorology, fisheries science, and other related disciplines. NOAA Corps officers operate NOAA ships, fly NOAA aircraft, manage research projects, conduct diving operations, and serve in staff positions throughout NOAA, as well as in positions in the United States Merchant Marine, United States Department of Defense, the United States Coast Guard, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the United States Department of State. Like its predecessors, the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps and the ESSA Corps, the NOAA Corps provides a ready source of technically skilled officers which can be incorporated into the U.S. Armed Forces in time of war, and in peacetime supports defense requirements in addition to its purely non-military scientific projects. [13] While civilian personnel could perform many of its functions, the advantage of the NOAA Corps as a commissioned service is the quick response time of its personnel, which NOAA can shift among projects and to various places around the world as the need arises more quickly and more easily than it could by reassigning or hiring civilian personnel to meet new or changing requirements. [12]

Engineering applied science

Engineering is the use of scientific principles to design and build machines, structures, and other items, including bridges, tunnels, roads, vehicles, and buildings. The discipline of engineering encompasses a broad range of more specialized fields of engineering, each with a more specific emphasis on particular areas of applied mathematics, applied science, and types of application. See glossary of engineering.

Earth science or geoscience includes all fields of natural science related to the planet Earth. This is a branch of science dealing with the physical constitution of the Earth and its atmosphere. Earth science is the study of our planet's physical characteristics, from earthquakes to raindrops, and floods to fossils. Earth science can be considered to be a branch of planetary science, but with a much older history. Earth science encompasses four main branches of study, the lithosphere, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, and the biosphere, each of which is further broken down into more specialized fields.

Oceanography The study of the physical and biological aspects of the ocean

Oceanography, also known as oceanology, is the study of the physical and biological aspects of the ocean. It is an important Earth science, which covers a wide range of topics, including ecosystem dynamics; ocean currents, waves, and geophysical fluid dynamics; plate tectonics and the geology of the sea floor; and fluxes of various chemical substances and physical properties within the ocean and across its boundaries. These diverse topics reflect multiple disciplines that oceanographers blend to further knowledge of the world ocean and understanding of processes within: astronomy, biology, chemistry, climatology, geography, geology, hydrology, meteorology and physics. Paleoceanography studies the history of the oceans in the geologic past.

History

Early history

The NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps traces its roots to the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. The Coast and Geodetic Survey's predecessor, the United States Survey of the Coast – renamed the United States Coast Survey in 1836 – was founded in 1807 under President Thomas Jefferson. Until the American Civil War, the Coast Survey was manned by civilian personnel working with United States Army and United States Navy officers. During the Civil War (1861–1865), Army officers were withdrawn from Coast Survey duty, never to return, while all but two Navy officers also were withdrawn from Coast Survey service for the duration of the war. Since most men of the Survey had Union sympathies, most stayed on with the Survey rather than resigning to serve the Confederate States of America; their work shifted in emphasis to support of the U.S. Navy and Union Army, and these Coast Surveyors are the professional ancestors of today's NOAA Corps. Those Coast Surveyors supporting the Union Army were given assimilated military rank while attached to a specific command, but those supporting the U.S. Navy operated as civilians and ran the risk of being executed as spies if captured by the Confederates while working in support of Union forces. After the war, U.S. Navy officers returned to duty with the Coast Survey, which was given authority over geodetic activities in the interior of the United States in 1871, and was subsequently renamed the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1878. [13] [14]

President of the United States Head of state and of government of the United States

The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

Thomas Jefferson Third President of the United States

Thomas Jefferson was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, and Founding Father who served as the third president of the United States from 1801 to 1809. Previously, he had served as the second vice president of the United States from 1797 to 1801. The principal author of the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson was a proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights, motivating American colonists to break from the Kingdom of Great Britain and form a new nation; he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level.

American Civil War Internal war in the U.S. over slavery

The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. War broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North, which also included some geographically western and southern states, proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights in order to uphold slavery.

With the outbreak of the Spanish–American War in April 1898, the Navy again withdrew all of its officers from Coast and Geodetic Survey assignments. They returned after the war ended in August 1898, but the system of U.S. Navy officers and men crewing the Survey's ships that had prevailed for most of the 19th century came to an end when the appropriation law––approved on June 6, 1900––provided for "all necessary employees to man and equip the vessels," instead of Navy personnel. The law took effect on July 1, 1900; at that point, all Navy personnel assigned to the Survey's ships remained aboard until the first call at each ship's home port, where they transferred off, with the Survey reimbursing the Navy for their pay accrued after July 1, 1900. [15] From July 1900, the Coast and Geodetic Survey continued as an entirely civilian-manned organization until after the United States entered World War I in April 1917. [13]

Spanish–American War Conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States

The Spanish–American War was an armed conflict between Spain and the United States in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. The war led to emergence of U.S. predominance in the Caribbean region, and resulted in U.S. acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions. That led to U.S. involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.

Home port Port at which a ship or boat is based

A vessel's home port is the port at which it is based, which may not be the same as its port of registry shown on its registration documents and lettered on the stern of the ship's hull. In the cruise industry the term "home port" is also often used in reference to the port in which a ship will take on / change over the majority of its passengers while taking on stores, supplies and fuel.

World War I 1914–1918 global war starting in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the Seminal Catastrophe, and initially in North America as the European War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps

To avoid the dangers that Coast Survey personnel had faced during the Civil War of being executed as spies if captured by the enemy, the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps was established on 22 May 1917, giving Coast and Geodetic Survey officers a commissioned status so that under the laws of war, they could not be executed as spies if they were captured while serving as surveyors on a battlefield during World War I. The creation of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps also ensured that in wartime a set of officers with technical skills in surveying could be assimilated rapidly into the United States armed forces so that their skills could be employed in military and naval work essential to the war effort. Before World War I ended in November 1918, over half of all Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps officers had served in the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, or United States Marine Corps, performing duty as artillery orienteering officers, as minelaying officers in the North Sea (where they were involved in the laying of the North Sea Mine Barrage), as navigators aboard troop transports, as intelligence officers, and as officers on the staff of American Expeditionary Force commanding officer General John "Black Jack" Pershing. [13]

International humanitarian law (IHL), also referred to as the laws of armed conflict, is the law that regulates the conduct of war. It is a branch of international law which seeks to limit the effects of armed conflict by protecting persons who are not participating in hostilities, and by restricting and regulating the means and methods of warfare available to combatants.

Espionage or spying is the act of obtaining secret or confidential information or divulging of the same without the permission of the holder of the information. Spies help agencies uncover secret information. Any individual or spy ring, in the service of a government, company or independent operation, can commit espionage. The practice is clandestine, as it is by definition unwelcome. In some circumstances it may be a legal tool of law enforcement and in others it may be illegal and punishable by law. Espionage is a method of intelligence gathering which includes information gathering from non-disclosed sources.

United States Marine Corps Amphibious warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations with the United States Navy as well as the Army and Air Force. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

The Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps returned to peacetime scientific pursuits after the war. [13] Its first flag officer was Rear Admiral Raymond S. Patton, who was promoted from captain to rear admiral in 1936.

When the United States entered World War II in December 1941, the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps again suspended its peacetime activities to support the war effort, often seeing front-line service. Over half of all Coast and Geodetic Survey officers were transferred to the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, or United States Army Air Forces, seeing duty in North Africa, Europe, the Pacific, and the defense of North America as artillery surveyors, hydrographers, amphibious engineers, beachmasters (i.e., directors of disembarkation), instructors at service schools, and in a wide variety of technical positions. They also served as reconnaissance surveyors for a worldwide aeronautical charting effort, and a Coast and Geodetic Survey officer was the first commanding officer of the Army Air Forces Aeronautical Chart Plant at St. Louis, Missouri. Three officers who remained in Coast and Geodetic Survey service were killed during the war, as were eleven other Survey personnel. [13]

After the war ended in August 1945, the Coast and Geodetic Survey again returned to peacetime scientific duties, although a significant amount of its work in succeeding years was related to support of military and naval requirements during the Cold War. [13]

The seal of the ESSA Corps, a predecessor of the NOAA Corps that existed from 1965 to 1970. ESSA Corps seal.jpg
The seal of the ESSA Corps, a predecessor of the NOAA Corps that existed from 1965 to 1970.

ESSA Corps

When the Coast and Geodetic Survey was transferred to the newly established Environmental Science Services Administration on July 13, 1965, [16] control of the corps was transferred from the Coast and Geodetic Survey to ESSA itself, and accordingly, the corps was redesignated the United States Environmental Science Services Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, known informally as the ESSA Corps. The ESSA Corps retained the responsibility of providing commissioned officers to operate the Coast and Geodetic Survey's ships and of providing a set of officers with technical skills in surveying for incorporation into the U.S. armed forces during wartime.

Following the establishment of the ESSA, Rear Admiral H. Arnold Karo was promoted to vice admiral in order to help lead the agency. He served as the first Deputy Administrator of ESSA and was the first vice admiral, and at the time the highest-ranking officer, in the combined history of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps and ESSA Corps. Rear Admiral James C. Tison, Jr. was the first director of the ESSA Corps.

NOAA Corps

The ESSA was reorganized and expanded to become the new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on October 3, 1970. [17] As a result, the ESSA Corps was redesignated the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, known informally as the NOAA Corps. Rear Admiral Harley D. Nygren was appointed as the first director of the new NOAA Corps.

In 1972, the NOAA Corps became the first uniformed service of the U.S. Government to recruit women on the same basis as men. [18] On June 1, 2012, the NOAA research vessel RV Gloria Michelle, a boat manned by two NOAA Corps personnel, became the first vessel in the history of NOAA (or its ancestor organizations) to have an all-female crew. [19] [20]

On January 2, 2014, Michael S. Devany was promoted to vice admiral upon assuming duties as Deputy Under Secretary for Operations at NOAA, becoming only the second vice admiral in the combined history of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, ESSA Corps, and NOAA Corps, and the first since the promotion of Vice Admiral Karo in 1965.[ citation needed ]

Directors of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, ESSA Corps, and NOAA Corps

ImageRankNameTenureNotes
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps
Ernest Lester Jones.jpg Ernest Lester Jones 1917–1929Superintendent (title changed to "Director" in 1919) of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey from 1915 until his death in 1929. As such, led the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps from its creation in 1917 until 1929. [21] Was a colonel and intelligence officer in the U.S. Army during World War I. [22]
Raymond Stanton Patton.jpg Captain/
rear admiral
Raymond Stanton Patton 1929–1937Director, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, which included leadership of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, from 1929 until his death in 1937. Became first flag officer in Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps history upon promotion to rear admiral in 1936. [21]
Rear Admiral Leo Otis Colbert.jpg Rear admiral Leo Otis Colbert 1938–1950Director, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, from 1938 to 1950, which included leadership of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps. [21]
Robert Francis Anthony Studds.JPG Rear admiral Robert Francis Anthony Studds 1950–1955Director, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, from 1950 to 1955, which included leadership of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps. [21]
Admiral KARO NOAA obit.jpg Rear admiral Henry Arnold Karo 1955–1965Last Director, Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps (1955–1965); simultaneously served as Director of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. At end of tour as Director, simultaneously transferred to new ESSA Corps and received promotion to vice admiral on 13 July 1965 to serve as Deputy Administrator, Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA), from 1965 to 1967. The first officer in the combined history of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps and ESSA Corps officer to achieve the rank of vice admiral. [21]
United States Environmental Science Services Administration Commissioned Officer Corps (ESSA Corps)
Rear Admiral James C. Tison, Jr.jpg Rear admiral James C. Tison, Jr. 1965–1968First Director, ESSA Corps. Served simultaneously as Director, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (1965–1968). [21]
RADM Don A. Jones.JPG Rear admiral Don A. Jones 1968–1970Last Director, ESSA Corps. Served simultaneously as last Director, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (1968–1970). Then served in NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps and was Director, National Ocean Survey, from 1970 to 1972. [21]
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps (NOAA Corps)
RADM Harley D. Nygren.JPG Rear admiral Harley D. Nygren 1970–1981First Director, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps [23]
LCDR Kelly E. Taggart.JPG Rear admiral Kelly E. Taggart 1981–1986 [24]
RADM Francis D. Moran.JPG Rear admiral Francis D. "Bill" Moran 1986–1990 [25]
RADM Sigmund R. Petersen.JPG Rear admiral Sigmund R. Petersen 1990–1995 [26]
RAdm William L. Stubblefield.jpg Rear admiral William L. Stubblefield 1995–1999 [27]
Evefields.jpg Rear admiral Evelyn J. Fields 1999–2003First woman and first African-American in the combined history of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, ESSA Corps, and NOAA Corps to serve as director. [28]
Samuel P. De Bow Jr.jpg Rear admiralSamuel P. De Bow, Jr.2003–2007 [29]
Radmjbailey.jpg Rear admiral Jonathan W. Bailey 2007–2012 [30]
RADM Devany, NOAA.jpg Rear admiral Michael S. Devany 2012–2014Promoted to vice admiral on 2 January 2014, only the second officer to achieve that rank in the combined history of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, ESSA Corps, and NOAA Corps, and the first to do so since Vice Admiral Karo in 1965. After tour as Director, became Deputy Under Secretary for Operations, NOAA. [31] [32]
RADM David Score, NOAA.jpg Rear admiral David A. Score 2014–2017 [33]
Michael J. Silah.JPG Rear admiral Michael J. Silah 2017–present [34]

Commissioned officers

The NOAA Corps uses the same commissioned officer ranks as the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard. While the grade of admiral has been established as a rank in the NOAA Corps, [35] the rank has not been authorized for use by the United States Congress. [36] Current NOAA Corps ranks rise from ensign to vice admiral, [37] [36] pay grades O-1 through O-9 respectively. NOAA Corps officers are appointed via direct commission and receive the same pay as other members of the uniformed services. They cannot hold a dual commission with another service, but inter-service transfers are sometimes permitted.

Commissioned officer ranks and abbreviations of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps
Ensign Lieutenant
(junior grade)
Lieutenant Lieutenant
Commander
Commander
O-1O-2O-3O-4O-5
US NOAA O1 insignia.svg US NOAA O2 insignia.svg US NOAA O-3 insignia.svg US NOAA O4 insignia.svg US NOAA O5 insignia.svg
ENSLTJGLTLCDRCDR
Captain Rear Admiral
(lower half)
Rear Admiral Vice Admiral [38]
O-6O-7O-8O-9
US NOAA O6 insignia.svg US NOAA O7 insignia.svg US NOAA O8 insignia.svg US NOAA O9 insignia.svg
CAPTRDMLRADMVADM

NOAA commissioned officers can be militarized by the President.

33 USC 3061 states:

The President may, whenever in the judgment of the President a sufficient national emergency exists, transfer to the service and jurisdiction of a military department such vessels, equipment, stations, and officers of the Administration as the President considers to be in the best interest of the country. An officer of the Administration transferred under this section, shall, while under the jurisdiction of a military department, have proper military status and shall be subject to the laws, regulations, and orders for the government of the Army, Navy, or Air Force, as the case may be, insofar as the same may be applicable to persons whose retention permanently in the military service of the United States is not contemplated by law.

Uniforms

For formal service uniforms, the NOAA Corps wears the same Service Dress Blues and Service Dress Whites as the U.S. Navy, but with NOAA Corps insignia in place of U.S. Navy insignia. For daily work uniforms, the NOAA Corps wears the same Operational Dress Uniform (ODU) as the U.S. Coast Guard, but with NOAA Corps insignia in place of U.S. Coast Guard insignia.

See also

Notes

Related Research Articles

Lieutenant (junior grade) Junior commissioned officer rank in the United States

Lieutenant , commonly abbreviated as LTJG or, historically, Lt. (j.g.), is a junior commissioned officer rank of the United States Navy, the United States Coast Guard, the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps. LTJG has a US military pay grade of O-2, and a NATO rank code of OF-1a. The rank is also used in the United States Maritime Service. The NOAA Corps's predecessors, the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps (1917–1965) and the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps or ESSA Corps (1965–1970), also used the rank.

U.S. National Geodetic Survey

The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), formerly the United States Survey of the Coast (1807–1836), United States Coast Survey (1836–1878), and United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) (1878–1970), is a United States federal agency that defines and manages a national coordinate system, providing the foundation for transportation and communication; mapping and charting; and a large number of applications of science and engineering. Since its foundation in its present form in 1970, it has been part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), of the United States Department of Commerce.

NOAA ships and aircraft

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO) operates a wide variety of specialized aircraft and ships to complete NOAA's environmental and scientific missions. OMAO also manages the NOAA Small Boat Program and the NOAA Diving Program, the latter having as part of its mission the job of ensuring a level of diving skill conducive to safe and efficient operations in NOAA-sponsored underwater activities.

Environmental Science Services Administration

The Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA) was a United States Federal executive agency created in 1965 as part of a reorganization of the United States Department of Commerce. Its mission was to unify and oversee the meteorological, climatological, hydrographic, and geodesic operations of the United States. It operated until 1970, when it was replaced by the new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Rear admiral in the United States refers to two different ranks of commissioned officers — one-star flag officers and two-star flag officers. By contrast, in most nations, the term "rear admiral" refers to an officer of two-star rank.

Lieutenant commander (United States) United States naval rank

Lieutenant commander (LCDR) is a mid-ranking officer rank in the United States Navy, the United States Coast Guard, the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, with the pay grade of O-4 and NATO rank code OF-3. The predecessors of the NOAA Corps, the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps (1917–1965) and the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps (1965–1970), also used the lieutenant commander rank, and the rank is also used in the United States Maritime Service and the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. Lieutenant commanders rank above lieutenants and below commanders, and rank is equivalent to a major in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps.

Evelyn J. Fields NOAA official

Evelyn J. Fields is a rear admiral (retired) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, who served as the director of the Commissioned Officer Corps and director of NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, until her retirement in 2003. She was nominated for this position by U.S. President Bill Clinton on January 19, 1999, confirmed by the Senate on May 6, 1999, and promoted from captain to rear admiral, upper half. Fields was the first woman, and first African American, to hold this position.

Awards and decorations of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, one of the seven uniformed services of the United States, has the authority to issue various awards and commendations to its members. These include individual honor awards, unit honor awards, service awards, training ribbons and qualification insignia. NOAA Corps awards and decorations include:

Navy Mutual Aid Association (NMAA) is a nonprofit, federally tax-exempt, mutual-benefit veteran service organization (VSO) that was established in 1879 by sea service officers for the purpose of providing life insurance and annuities for members of the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, United States Coast Guard, U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and their families.

Michael S. Devany American admiral

Michael S. Devany is a former vice admiral in the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps who last served as the Deputy Under Secretary for Operations at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from January 2, 2014 to April 2016. He previously served as director of the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps from August 13, 2012 to January 1, 2014, succeeding RADM Jonathan W. Bailey. As Deputy Under Secretary for Operations at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, he was NOAA’s chief operating officer. VADM Devany was responsible for the day-to-day management of NOAA’s national and international operations for oceanic and atmospheric services, research, and coastal and marine stewardship. He is a key advisor to the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere/NOAA Administrator on NOAA program and policy issues. Devany was the first NOAA Corps officer to achieve the rank of vice admiral since VADM Henry A. Karo in 1965, and the second NOAA Corps officer overall. Devany retired from NOAA in April 2016 after over 30 years of combined uniformed service.

Captain (United States O-6) Rank in the United States uniformed services, O-6

In the United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (USPHS), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, captain is the senior-most commissioned officer rank below that of flag officer. The equivalent rank is colonel in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps.

Leo Otis Colbert

Rear Admiral Leo Otis Colbert was the third Director of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey and a career officer in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, predecessor of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps.

James C. Tison Jr.

Rear Admiral James C. Tison Jr. was an officer in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps and Environmental Science Services Administration Corps, both predecessors of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps. He served simultaneously as the first Director of the ESSA Corps, one of only two people to hold the position, and as the sixth Director of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Don A. Jones

Rear Admiral Don A. Jones was an officer in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, its successor, the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps, and the ESSA Corps's successor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps. He served simultaneously as the second and last Director of the ESSA Corps, one of only two people to hold the position, and as the seventh and last Director of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Harley D. Nygren

Rear Admiral Harley D. Nygren is a retired officer who served in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, its successor, the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps, and the ESSA Corps's successor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps. He served as the first Director of the NOAA Corps.

Kelly E. Taggart

Rear Admiral Kelly E. Taggart was a career officer who served in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, its successor, the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps, and the ESSA Corps's successor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps. He served as the second Director of the NOAA Corps.

Francis D. Moran

Rear Admiral Francis D. "Bill" Moran is a retired career officer who served in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, its successor, the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps, and the ESSA Corps's successor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps. He served as the third Director of the NOAA Corps.

Sigmund R. Petersen

Rear Admiral Sigmund R. Petersen is a retired career officer who served in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps, its successor, the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps, and the ESSA Corps's successor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps. He served as the fourth Director of the NOAA Corps.

References

  1. "33 U.S. Code § 3005 - Number of authorized commissioned officers". LII / Legal Information Institute.
  2. "Fleet | Office of Marine and Aviation Operations". www.omao.noaa.gov.
  3. Goodwin, Mel (July 19, 2012). Sbeih, Nadia (ed.). "NOAA Introduction" (PDF). U.S. Department of Commerce. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. National Ocean Service. p. 1. http://celebrating200years.noaa.gov/edufun/book/NOAAintroduction.pdf
  4. "Forward With NOAA (NOAA Corps Song) - Office of Marine and Aviation Operations".
  5. 1 2 "History of the NOAA Commissioned Corps". Archived from the original on August 25, 2009.
  6. Note: Also concurrently serves as Director, Office of Marine and Aviation Operations
  7. Note: Also concurrently serves as Deputy Director for Operations, Office of Marine and Aviation Operations
  8. Note: Also concurrently serves as the U.S. National Hydrographer
  9. "NOAA History /NOAA Legacy/NOAA Corps and the Coast and Geodetic Survey". www.history.noaa.gov.
  10. "History of the NOAA Corps". Archived from the original on August 25, 2009.
  11. "NOAA History - Roots of the NOAA Corps". www.history.noaa.gov.
  12. 1 2 Rensberger, Boyce; Rensberger, Boyce (September 10, 1986). "The Few, the Proud -- the NOAA?" via washingtonpost.com.
  13. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "NOAA History /NOAA Legacy/NOAA Corps and the Coast and Geodetic Survey".
  14. "NOAA History - NOAA Legacy Timeline - 1800's".
  15. U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (1901). Report Of The Superintendent of the Coast And Geodetic Survey Showing The Progress Of Work From July 1, 1900 To June 30, 1901. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. pp. 15, 17, 109.
  16. "NOAA History - NOAA Legacy/Historic Documents - Reorg Plan Establishing ESSA Under Dept. of Commerce".
  17. Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1970, reprinted with amendments in 5 U.S.C. app. at 1557–61. Section 3(d) states: "The Commissioned Officer Corps of the Environmental Science Services Administration shall become the Commissioned Officer Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration."
  18. "NOAA History - NOAA Legacy Timeline - 1970-2000".
  19. teehan, sean. "NOAA ship leaves Woods Hole with first all-female crew".
  20. Hefler, Janet (June 6, 2012). "Lt. Anna-Liza Villard-Howe takes command of NOAA research vessel".
  21. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Leaders of Coast Survey" (PDF). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved August 29, 2013.
  22. "NOAA History - Tools of the Trade/Ships/C&GS Ships/LESTER JONES". www.history.noaa.gov.
  23. "C&GS Biographies". Profiles in Time NOAA History. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved August 29, 2013.
  24. "Jimmy Carter: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Nomination of Capt. Kelly E. Taggart To Be Director of the Commissioned Officer Corps".
  25. "Ronald Reagan: Nomination of Rear admiral Francis D. Moran To Be Director of the Commissioned Officer Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration".
  26. "Nation's Smallest Service to Get New Leader".
  27. "Rear admiral William Stubblefield Confirmed By Senate As Director Of Office Of NOAA Corps Operations". Archived from the original on August 6, 2013.
  28. "Rear admiral Evelyn J. Fields Formally Assumes Command of Office of NOAA Corps Operations and NOAA Commissioned Corps". Archived from the original on February 12, 2008.
  29. "President Bush Appoints Rear admiral Samuel P. De DeBow Jr. to Mississippi River Commission". Archived from the original on June 15, 2010.
  30. Schrader, Kurt (September 19, 2012). "H.Res.792 - 112th Congress (2011-2012): Honoring Rear Admiral Jonathan W. Bailey of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Commissioned Officer Corps for his lifetime of selfless commitment and exemplary service to the United States". www.congress.gov.
  31. "Vice Adm. Devany named NOAA Deputy Under Secretary".
  32. "RADM Michael S. Devany, NOAA Director, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps Director, NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations" (PDF). US Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 15, 2013. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  33. "Rear Adm. David A. Score to lead NOAA Corps and Office of Marine and Aviation Operations". US Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  34. "Michael Silah to lead NOAA Corps and Office of Marine and Aviation Operations". US Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved September 3, 2017.
  35. 10 USC 201. Pay grades: assignment to; general rules
  36. 1 2 S.2388 - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps Amendments Act of 2012
  37. "Heraldry | Office of Marine and Aviation Operations". www.omao.noaa.gov.
  38. Note: This rank is currently not in use.