Administration for Children and Families

Last updated
Administration for Children & Families
Administration for Children and Families logo.svg
Administration/Office overview
FormedApril 15, 1991
Jurisdiction Federal government of the United States
Headquarters Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building
Washington, D.C., United States
Administration/Office executive
Parent department U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Website www.acf.hhs.gov

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is a division of the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). It is headed by the Assistant Secretary for Children and Families. It has a $49 billion budget for 60 programs that target children, youth and families. [1] These programs include assistance with welfare, child support enforcement, adoption assistance, foster care, child care, and child abuse.

United States Department of Health and Human Services department of the US federal government

The United States Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), also known as the Health Department, is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government with the goal of protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. Its motto is "Improving the health, safety, and well-being of America". Before the separate federal Department of Education was created in 1979, it was called the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW).

In family law and public policy, child support is an ongoing, periodic payment made by a parent for the financial benefit of a child following the end of a marriage or other relationship. Child maintenance is paid directly or indirectly by an obligor to an obligee for the care and support of children of a relationship that has been terminated, or in some cases never existed. Often the obligor is a non-custodial parent. The obligee is typically a custodial parent, a caregiver, a guardian, or the state.

Adoption process whereby a person assumes the parenting for a child born by other parents

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Contents

Mission statement

"The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), within the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), provides national leadership and creates opportunities for families to lead economically and socially productive lives. ACF's programs are designed to help children to develop into healthy adults and communities to become more prosperous and supportive of their members." [2]

Major goals

ACF is responsible for federal programs that promote the economic and social well-being of families, children, individuals and communities. ACF programs aim to achieve the following:

Major programs

The Administration for Native Americans (ANA) is a department of the United States Department of Health and Human Services established in 1974 through the Native American Programs Act (NAPA).

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The Office of Child Care (OCC) is a division of the US Executive Branch under the Administration for Children and Families and the Department of Health and Human Services. It was officially formed in 2010 and replaced the former Child Care Bureau, which was itself established under the Administration on Children, Youth and Families in 1995 by the Clinton Administration. The OCC had been previously established as an unofficial organization within the Child Care Bureau by psychologist Edward Zigler, composed initially of only two staff members.

Other initiatives, clearinghouses and resources

Abstinence education

For fiscal year 2006, ending September 30, 2006, Congress appropriated $50 million for state grants for abstinence education programs. Such programs teach that abstaining from sex is the only effective or acceptable method to prevent pregnancy or disease, and give no instruction on birth control or safe sex. In October 2006, revised guidelines by ACF specified that states seeking grants are "to identify groups ... most likely to bear children out-of-wedlock, targeting adolescents and/or adults within the 12- through 29-year-old age range". Previous guidelines didn't mention specific ages, and programs focused on preteens and teens. [4]

Abstinence self-enforced restraint from indulging in bodily activities

Abstinence is a self-enforced restraint from indulging in bodily activities that are widely experienced as giving pleasure. Most frequently, the term refers to sexual abstinence, or abstinence from alcohol, drugs, or food.

ACF also administers the Community-Based Abstinence Education Program, which is focused on funding public and private entities that provide abstinence-until-marriage education for adolescents from 12 to 18 years old. For fiscal year 2005, 63 grants were awarded, totaling $104 million to organizations and other entities; in fiscal 2001, grants totaled only $20 million. In October 2006, the Government Accountability Office reported that ACF does not review its grantees' education materials for scientific accuracy and does not require grantees of either program to review their own materials for scientific accuracy. GAO also reported that most of the efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of abstinence-until-marriage education programs included in GAO's review have not met certain minimum scientific criteria. [5]

See also

Notes

  1. ACF Office of Legislative Affairs and Budget: Budget Information Archived August 13, 2010, at the Wayback Machine .
  2. 1 2 ACF Office of Public Affairs (OPA): Fact Sheet - Administration for Native Americans (ANA) Archived March 10, 2006, at the Wayback Machine .
  3. "Administration on Children, Youth and Families". Administration for Children and Families. February 4, 2016. Retrieved September 2, 2016.
  4. Abstinence message goes beyond teens - USATODAY.com
  5. "Abstinence Education: Efforts to Assess the Accuracy and Effectiveness of Federally Funded Programs", U.S. Government Accountability Office, October 2006

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