Office of Foreign Missions

Last updated
Office of Foreign Missions
US-OfficeOfForeignMissions-Logo.svg
Agency overview
Formed1982
Headquarters2201 C Street NW
Room 2236
Washington, D.C. 20520
Agency executive
Parent agency Under Secretary for Management
Website http://www.state.gov/ofm

The Office of Foreign Missions (OFM) was mandated by the United States Congress to serve the interests of the American public, the American diplomatic community abroad, and the foreign diplomatic community residing in the United States ensuring that all diplomatic benefits, privileges, and immunities would be properly exercised in accordance with federal laws and international agreements.

Contents

The Foreign Missions Act (22 U.S.C. 4301-4316) provides the legal foundation to facilitate secure and efficient operations of U.S. missions abroad, and of foreign missions and international organizations in the United States.

Mission

The Office of Foreign Missions has four missions.

  1. Ensure equitable treatment for United States diplomatic and consular missions abroad and their personnel through reciprocity;
  2. Regulate the activities of foreign missions in the United States in a manner that will protect the foreign policy and national security interests of the United States;
  3. Ensure compliance of diplomatic privileges and immunities for foreign diplomats and officials residing in the United States to enhance U.S. security;
  4. Provide appropriate privileges, benefits, and services on a reciprocal basis to the foreign mission community in the United States.

As an advocate for reciprocal agreements, OFM presses for fair treatment of U.S. personnel abroad while assuring foreign diplomats based in the United States receive the same treatment that each respective government provides in return. Additionally, OFM assists foreign missions in dealing with local government offices in the United States.

OFM also provides a range of services to the foreign diplomatic community, including issuance of vehicle titles, vehicle registrations, driver's licenses, and license plates; processing of tax exemption and duty-free customs requests; and facilitation of property acquisitions through local zoning law procedures. By assisting, advising, and regulating services for foreign diplomats, their dependents, and their staffs while residing in the United States.

Finally, OFM establishes and maintains relationships with U.S. law enforcement and security communities at the national, state, and local levels to educate them about diplomatic privilege and immunity issues.

See also

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