Permanent members of the United Nations Security Council

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The permanent members of the United Nations Security Council. UNSC P5.PNG
The permanent members of the United Nations Security Council.

The permanent members of the United Nations Security Council (also known as the Permanent Five, Big Five, or P5) are the five states which the UN Charter of 1945 grants a permanent seat on the UN Security Council: The People's Republic of China (formerly the Republic of China), the French Republic, the Russian Federation (formerly the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, aka the Soviet Union), the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of America.[ not verified in body ] These countries were all allies in World War II (and the victors of that war),[ not verified in body ] and are also all states with nuclear weapons.[ not verified in body ] The remaining 10 members of the UNSC are elected, giving a total of 15 UN member states.[ not verified in body ] All five permanent members have the power of veto, which enables any one of them to prevent the adoption of any "substantive" draft Council resolution, regardless of its level of international support.[ not verified in body ] [1] [ dead link ]

Contents

Current permanent members

The following is a table of the current permanent members of the U.N. Security Council.

CountryCurrent state representation[ citation needed ]Former state representation[ citation needed ]Current executive leaders[ citation needed ] Current representative
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  People's Republic of China (from 1971)Flag of the Republic of China.svg Republic of China (1945–1971)President: Xi Jinping
Premier: Li Keqiang [2]
Ma Zhaoxu [3] [ full citation needed ]
Flag of France.svg  France Flag of France.svg French Fifth Republic (from 1958)Flag of France.svg Provisional Government of the French Republic (1945–1946)
Flag of France (1794-1815).svg  French Fourth Republic (1946–1958)
President: Emmanuel Macron
Prime Minister: Édouard Philippe
François Delattre [3] [ full citation needed ]
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Flag of Russia.svg  Russian Federation (from 1991)Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (1945–1991)President: Vladimir Putin
Prime Minister: Mikhail Mishustin
Vasily Nebenzya [3] [ full citation needed ]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (from 1945)Queen: Elizabeth II
Prime Minister: Boris Johnson
Karen Pierce [3] [ full citation needed ]
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of the United States.svg  United States of America (from 1945)President: Donald Trump Kelly Craft [3] [ full citation needed ]
The original permanent members of the United Nations Security Council in 1945 (dark blue) with their respective colonies and other holdings shown (pale blue). 1945 UNSC P5 + colonies.png
The original permanent members of the United Nations Security Council in 1945 (dark blue) with their respective colonies and other holdings shown (pale blue).

History

At the UN's founding in 1945, the five permanent members of the Security Council were the French Republic, the Republic of China, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. There have been two seat changes since then, although not reflected in Article 23 of the United Nations Charter as it has not been accordingly amended:

Leaders of the five permanent member states at a summit in 2000. Clockwise from front left: Chinese President Jiang Zemin, U.S. President Bill Clinton, UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, Russian President Vladimir Putin, and French President Jacques Chirac. Vladimir Putin at the Millennium Summit 6-8 September 2000-23.jpg
Leaders of the five permanent member states at a summit in 2000. Clockwise from front left: Chinese President Jiang Zemin, U.S. President Bill Clinton, UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, Russian President Vladimir Putin, and French President Jacques Chirac.

Additionally, France reformed its provisional government into the French Fourth Republic in 1946 and later into the French Fifth Republic in 1958, both under the leadership of Charles de Gaulle. France maintained its seat as there was no change in its international status or recognition, although many of its overseas possessions eventually became independent.

The five permanent members of the Security Council were the victorious powers in World War II and have maintained the world's most powerful military forces ever since. They annually top the list of countries with the highest military expenditures; in 2011, they spent over US$1 trillion combined on defence, accounting for over 60% of global military expenditures (the U.S. alone accounting for over 40%). They are also five of the world's six largest arms exporters (along with Germany [4] [ dead link ]), and are the only nations officially recognised as "nuclear-weapon states" under the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), though there are other states known or believed to be in possession of nuclear weapons.

Veto power

The "power of veto" refers to the veto power wielded solely by the permanent members, enabling them to prevent the adoption of any "substantive" draft Council resolution, regardless of the level of international support for the draft. The veto does not apply to procedural votes, which is significant in that the Security Council's permanent membership can vote against a "procedural" draft resolution, without necessarily blocking its adoption by the Council.

The veto is exercised when any permanent member—the so-called "P5"—casts a "negative" vote on a "substantive" draft resolution. Abstention or absence from the vote by a permanent member does not prevent a draft resolution from being adopted.

Expansion

The G4 nations that support one another's bids for permanent seats on the UN Security Council G4 Nations.svg
The G4 nations that support one another's bids for permanent seats on the UN Security Council

There have been proposals suggesting the introduction of new permanent members. The candidates usually mentioned are Brazil, Germany, India, and Japan. They comprise the group of four countries known as the G4 nations, which mutually support one another's bids for permanent seats.

This sort of reform has traditionally been opposed by the Uniting for Consensus group, which is composed primarily of nations that are regional rivals and economic competitors of the G4. The group is led by Italy and Spain (opposing Germany), Mexico, Colombia, and Argentina (opposing Brazil), Pakistan (opposing India), and South Korea (opposing Japan), in addition to Turkey, Indonesia and others. Since 1992, Italy and other council members have instead proposed semi-permanent seats or expanding the number of temporary seats.[ citation needed ]

Most of the leading candidates for permanent membership are regularly elected onto the Security Council by their respective groups. Japan was elected for eleven two-year terms, Brazil for ten terms, and Germany for three terms. India has been elected to the council seven times in total, with the most recent successful bid being in 2010 after a gap of almost twenty years since 1991–92.

In 2013, the P5 and G4 members of the UN Security Council accounted for eight of the world's ten largest defence budgets, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

Current leaders of the permanent members

The following are the heads of state and government that represent the permanent members of the UN Security Council as of 2019:[ citation needed ]

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References

  1. [1][ dead link ]
  2. 1 2 The de jure head of government of China is the Premier, whose current holder is Li Keqiang.[ citation needed ] The President of China is legally a ceremonial office,[ citation needed ] but the General Secretary of the Communist Party of China (de facto leader) has always held this office since 1993, except for the months of transition.[ citation needed ] The current paramount leader [ clarification needed ] is President Xi Jinping.[ citation needed ]
  3. [2][ dead link ]
  4. [3][ dead link ]

Further reading

See also