Bill Clay

Last updated
Bill Clay
BillClaySr.jpg
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Missouri's 1st district
In office
January 3, 1969 January 3, 2001
Preceded by Frank M. Karsten
Succeeded by Lacy Clay
Personal details
Born
William Lacy Clay

(1931-04-30) April 30, 1931 (age 88)
St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s)
Carol Johnson(m. 1953)
Children3, including Lacy
Education Saint Louis University (BS)

William Lacy Clay Sr. (born April 30, 1931) is an American politician from Missouri. As Congressman from Missouri's First District, he represented portions of St. Louis in the U.S. House of Representatives for 32 years.

Contents

Early life and family

Clay was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of Luella S. (Hyatt) and Irving Charles Clay. [1] He graduated from Saint Louis University. Clay served in the United States Army from 1953 to 1955, and he was a St. Louis alderman from 1959 to 1964. Clay served 105 days in jail for participating in a Civil Rights demonstration in 1963. Prior to entering Congress, Clay held jobs first as a real estate broker and later as a labor coordinator. He worked for the union of St. Louis city employees from 1961 to 1964 and then with a Steamfitters Union until 1967.

Clay married Carol Ann Johnson in 1953. They had three children, including William Lacy Clay Jr., who would succeed his father in the U.S. House. [2] [3]

Politics

Clay was elected to the House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1968. He became an advocate for environmentalism, labor issues, and social justice. Clay faced ethics charges in the 1970s for billing the government on auto trips while flying on airlines, and the House banking scandal revealed that Clay had 328 overdrafts. In 1993, Clay helped to pass the Family and Medical Leave Act.

From 1991 until the Democrats lost control of Congress in 1995, Clay chaired the House Committee on the Post Office and Civil Service. In 2000, he retired from the House and his son Lacy Clay succeeded him.

Honors

In 1996, the William L. Clay Center for Molecular Electronics (now the Center for Nanoscience) was dedicated in his honor on the campus of the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Clay is also the founder of the William L. Clay Scholarship and Research Fund, which awards college scholarships to high school seniors living in Missouri's First Congressional District. The Fund, which is a 501(c)3 organization, has awarded scholarships since 1985.

Poplar Street Bridge, which connects St. Louis, Missouri, and East St. Louis, Illinois, was renamed on October 7, 2013, Congressman William L. Clay Sr. Bridge. [4]

William L. Clay has a star and informative biographical plaque on the St. Louis Walk of Fame. [5]

Works

Clay has written several works of non-fiction.

See also

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References

  1. "Lacy Clay ancestry". freepages.rootsweb.com.
  2. "Clay, William Lacy 1931–". Contemporary Black Biography. Encyclopedia.com. 2005. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  3. "CLAY, William Lacy, Sr". United States House of Representatives Office of the Historian. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  4. https://www.stltoday.com/news/state-and-regional/missouri/st-louis-bridge-renamed-for-long-time-congressman/article_4aa107e9-e014-55e3-a6b5-67af8c53c9ba.html%5B%5D
  5. St. Louis Walk of Fame. "St. Louis Walk of Fame Inductees". stlouiswalkoffame.org. Archived from the original on 31 October 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2013.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Frank M. Karsten
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 1st congressional district

1969–2001
Succeeded by
Lacy Clay
Preceded by
William D. Ford
Chair of House Civil Service Committee
1991–1995
Position abolished