United States House Committee on Accounts

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The United States House Committee on Accounts was a standing committee of the US House of Representatives from 1803 to 1946. It had purview over the financial accounts of the House's contingent fund, as well as some matters related to facilities and staffing. In 1946, it was merged into the newly formed the Committee on House Administration. [1]

In the United States Congress, standing committees are permanent legislative panels established by the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate rules. Because they have legislative jurisdiction, standing committees consider bills and issues and recommend measures for consideration by their respective chambers. They also have oversight responsibility to monitor agencies, programs, and activities within their jurisdictions, and in some cases in areas that cut across committee jurisdictions. Due to their permanent nature, these committees exist beyond the adjournment of each two-year meeting of Congress.

United States House Committee on House Administration Standing committee of the United States House of Representatives

The United States House Committee on House Administration deals with the general administration matters of the United States House of Representatives.

Contents

Jurisdiction

Its jurisdiction covered all subjects "touching the expenditure of the contingent fund of the House, [and] the auditing and settling of all accounts which may be charged therein to the House." In addition, the committee was responsible for the accountability of officers of the House, the procurement of rooms for the use of House committees and for the Speaker, and for recommending and authorizing the employment of such persons as stenographers, reporters of debates, janitors, and clerks and staff assistants for committees, members and senators.

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives position

The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. The office was established in 1789 by Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution. The Speaker is the political and parliamentary leader of the House of Representatives, and is simultaneously the House's presiding officer, de facto leader of the body's majority party, and the institution's administrative head. Speakers also perform various other administrative and procedural functions. Given these several roles and responsibilities, the Speaker usually does not personally preside over debates. That duty is instead delegated to members of the House from the majority party. Neither does the Speaker regularly participate in floor debates.

History

The committee was created on December 27, 1803, and was made a standing committee in 1805. In 1911, the functions of the Committee on Ventilation and Acoustics were transferred to the Committee on Accounts, and in 1927 the functions of the Committee on Mileage were similarly transferred.

The United States House Committee on Ventilation and Acoustics is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives.

The United States House Committee on Mileage is a former standing committee of the United States House of Representatives.

In 1946, the Committee on House Administration was created by the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, which superseded ten standing committees, assuming the jurisdictions and functions of some of the oldest and longest standing committees of the House. Among the merged committees were the House Committee on Accounts, along with the Committees on Enrolled Bills (created in 1789 as Joint Committee), Elections (created in 1794), Printing (created in 1846), Disposition of Executive Papers (created in 1889), Memorials (created in 1929), and some functions of the Joint Committee on the Library (created in 1806 as a Joint Committee). [1]

The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 was the most comprehensive reorganization of the United States Congress in history to that date.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Guide to House Records: Chapter 12: Committee on Accounts". Records of the Administration Committee and Its Predecessors. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 7 April 2017.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the National Archives and Records Administration website https://www.archives.gov/ .

National Archives and Records Administration independent agency of the United States government which preserves and provides access to federal records

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the United States government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records and with increasing public access to those documents, which comprise the National Archives. NARA is officially responsible for maintaining and publishing the legally authentic and authoritative copies of acts of Congress, presidential directives, and federal regulations. The NARA also transmits votes of the Electoral College to Congress.