San Miguel County, New Mexico

Last updated

San Miguel County
San Miguel County New Mexico Court House.jpg
San Miguel County Courthouse in Las Vegas
Map of New Mexico highlighting San Miguel County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of New Mexico
New Mexico in United States.svg
New Mexico's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°28′N104°50′W / 35.47°N 104.83°W / 35.47; -104.83
Country Flag of the United States.svg United States
State Flag of New Mexico.svg  New Mexico
FoundedJanuary 9, 1852
Seat Las Vegas
Largest cityLas Vegas
Area
  Total4,736 sq mi (12,270 km2)
  Land4,716 sq mi (12,210 km2)
  Water20 sq mi (50 km2)  0.4%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2016)
27,760
  Density6.2/sq mi (2.4/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district 3rd
Website www.smcounty.net

San Miguel County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 29,393. [1] Its county seat is Las Vegas. [2]

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

New Mexico U.S. state in the United States

New Mexico is a state in the Southwestern region of the United States of America; its capital and cultural center is Santa Fe, which was founded in 1610 as capital of Nuevo México, while its largest city is Albuquerque with its accompanying metropolitan area. It is one of the Mountain States and shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and Arizona; its other neighboring states are Oklahoma to the northeast, Texas to the east-southeast, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua to the south and Sonora to the southwest. With a population around two million, New Mexico is the 36th state by population. With a total area of 121,592 sq mi (314,920 km2), it is the fifth-largest and sixth-least densely populated of the 50 states. Due to their geographic locations, northern and eastern New Mexico exhibit a colder, alpine climate, while western and southern New Mexico exhibit a warmer, arid climate.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

San Miguel County comprises the Las Vegas, NM Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Albuquerque-Santa Fe-Las Vegas, NM Combined Statistical Area.

Albuquerque, New Mexico City in New Mexico, United States

Albuquerque, also known locally as Duke City and abbreviated as ABQ, is the most populous city in the U.S. state of New Mexico and the 32nd-most populous city in the United States, with a census-estimated population of 558,545 in 2017. It is the principal city of the Albuquerque metropolitan area, which has 915,927 residents as of July 2018. Albuquerque's Metropolitan statistical area is the 60th-largest in the United States. The Albuquerque MSA population includes the cities of Rio Rancho, Bernalillo, Placitas, Corrales, Los Lunas, Belen, and Bosque Farms, and forms part of the larger Albuquerque–Santa Fe–Las Vegas combined statistical area, with a total population of 1,171,991 in 2016.

Santa Fe, New Mexico State capital city in New Mexico, United States

Santa Fe is the capital of the U.S. state of New Mexico. It is the fourth-largest city in the state and the seat of Santa Fe County.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,736 square miles (12,270 km2), of which 4,716 square miles (12,210 km2) is land and 20 square miles (52 km2) (0.4%) is water. [3]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Adjacent counties

Mora County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Mora County is a county in the US state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,881. Its county seat is the census-designated place (CDP) Mora. The county has another CDP, Watrous, a village, Wagon Mound, New Mexico, and 12 smaller unincorporated settlements. Mora became a formal county in the US, in what was then the New Mexico Territory, on February 1, 1860. Ecclesiastically, the county is within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santa Fe. County population peaked at about 14,000 around 1920, declining to about 4,000 to 5,000 since the 1970s; the 2016 estimate was 4,500.

Harding County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Harding County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 695, making it the least populous county in the state, and the 14th-smallest county by population in the United States. Its county seat is Mosquero. The county is named for United States President Warren G. Harding, and was created on the day of his inauguration as president on March 4, 1921.

Quay County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Quay County is a county in the state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,041. Its county seat is Tucumcari. The county was named for Pennsylvania senator Matthew Quay, who supported statehood for New Mexico. It is west from the Texas state line.

National protected areas

Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge

With the Rocky Mountains to the west, the Great Plains to the east, and the Chihuahuan Desert to the south, Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge encompasses a diversity of habitats. Located along the Central Flyway, the Refuge provides an important resting, feeding, and wintering area for migrating geese, ducks, and cranes.

Pecos National Historical Park United States historic place

Pecos National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park in San Miguel and Santa Fe Counties, New Mexico. The park, operated by the National Park Service, encompasses thousands of acres of landscape infused with historical elements from prehistoric archaeological ruins to 19th-century ranches, to a battlefield of the American Civil War. Its largest single feature is Pecos Pueblo, a Native American community abandoned in historic times. First a state monument in 1935, it was made Pecos National Monument in 1965, and greatly enlarged and renamed in 1990. Two sites within the park, the pueblo and the Glorieta Pass Battlefield, are National Historic Landmarks.

Santa Fe National Forest

The Santa Fe National Forest is a protected national forest in northern New Mexico in the Southwestern United States. It was established in 1915 and covers 1,558,452 acres (6,306.83 km2). Elevations range from 5,300 feet (1600 m) to 13,103 feet (4000 m) at the summit of Truchas Peak, located within the Pecos Wilderness. The Jemez, Coyote, and Cuba districts are located in the Jemez Mountains; the Pecos/Las Vegas district is located in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains; and the Española district is located in both mountain ranges. In descending order of land area the forest lies in parts of Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Mora, and Los Alamos counties. Forest headquarters are located in the city of Santa Fe.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 22,930
1920 22,867−0.3%
1930 23,6363.4%
1940 27,91018.1%
1950 26,512−5.0%
1960 23,468−11.5%
1970 21,951−6.5%
1980 22,7513.6%
1990 25,74313.2%
2000 30,12617.0%
2010 29,393−2.4%
Est. 201627,760 [4] −5.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]
1790-1960 [6] 1900-1990 [7]
1990-2000 [8] 2010-2016 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, [9] there were 30,126 people, 11,134 households, and 7,537 families residing in the county. The population density was 6 people per square mile (2/km²). There were 14,254 housing units at an average density of 3 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 56.22% White, 0.78% Black or African American, 1.82% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 36.21% from other races, and 4.33% from two or more races. 77.96% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

2000 United States Census 22nd determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000

The Twenty-second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census. This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area, or exceptionally unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 11,134 households out of which 34.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.50% were married couples living together, 16.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.30% were non-families. 26.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the county, the population was spread out with 27.40% under the age of 18, 10.90% from 18 to 24, 27.00% from 25 to 44, 22.90% from 45 to 64, and 11.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 96.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,524, and the median income for a family was $31,250. Males had a median income of $27,307 versus $22,588 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,268. About 19.90% of families and 24.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.80% of those under age 18 and 25.90% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 29,393 people, 11,978 households, and 7,275 families residing in the county. [10] The population density was 6.2 inhabitants per square mile (2.4/km2). There were 15,595 housing units at an average density of 3.3 per square mile (1.3/km2). [11] The racial makeup of the county was 66.6% white, 1.7% American Indian, 1.4% black or African American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 25.4% from other races, and 3.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 76.8% of the population. [10] In terms of ancestry, 6.3% were German, 5.3% were English, and 1.6% were American. [12]

Of the 11,978 households, 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.6% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 39.3% were non-families, and 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.95. The median age was 40.7 years. [10]

The median income for a household in the county was $32,213 and the median income for a family was $42,888. Males had a median income of $35,176 versus $28,351 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,508. About 15.7% of families and 24.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.6% of those under age 18 and 22.7% of those age 65 or over. [13]

Communities

City

Villages

Census-designated places

Other communities

Ghost town

Notable people

Politics

Presidential election results
Presidential election results [14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 21.5% 2,31367.8% 7,28510.7% 1,153
2012 20.0% 2,30376.9% 8,8503.1% 356
2008 19.2% 2,47879.8% 10,3201.1% 143
2004 27.3% 3,31371.7% 8,6831.0% 120
2000 24.2% 2,21571.4% 6,5404.4% 406
1996 20.1% 1,93872.5% 6,9957.4% 714
1992 23.3% 2,18365.9% 6,18610.8% 1,018
1988 30.6% 2,76368.0% 6,1311.4% 129
1984 39.4% 3,48559.1% 5,2271.6% 138
1980 39.3% 3,29253.9% 4,5146.7% 563
1976 37.2% 3,16261.2% 5,2041.7% 141
1972 47.7% 4,43450.2% 4,6632.1% 196
1968 48.1% 4,02748.9% 4,0883.0% 253
1964 31.9% 2,71467.8% 5,7670.3% 24
1960 41.9% 3,98858.0% 5,5200.1% 6
1956 55.9% 5,08344.1% 4,0140.0% 3
1952 54.6% 5,36045.3% 4,4510.1% 7
1948 48.3% 4,65551.4% 4,9530.2% 21
1944 46.1% 4,01453.8% 4,6840.1% 4
1940 44.6% 4,88255.3% 6,0540.1% 7
1936 43.1% 4,69756.8% 6,1990.1% 10
1932 51.3% 5,36448.5% 5,0760.2% 20
1928 59.3% 5,18440.7% 3,5600.1% 4
1924 50.6% 3,89446.0% 3,5433.4% 265
1920 58.1% 5,53541.9% 3,990
1916 56.4% 2,93242.9% 2,2310.7% 38
1912 55.7% 2,47939.1% 1,7405.3% 234

See also

Related Research Articles

Valencia County, New Mexico County in New Mexico

Valencia County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 76,569. The county seat is Los Lunas.

Torrance County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Torrance County is a county located in the center of the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,383. The county seat is Estancia.

Taos County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Taos County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 32,937. Its county seat is Taos. The county was formed in 1852 as one of the original nine counties in New Mexico Territory.

Sierra County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Sierra County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,988. Its county seat is Truth or Consequences.

Santa Fe County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Santa Fe County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 144,170, making it New Mexico's third-most populous county, after Bernalillo County and Doña Ana County. Its county seat is Santa Fe, the state capital.

San Juan County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

San Juan County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 130,044, making it the fifth-most populous county in New Mexico. Its county seat is Aztec. The county was created in 1887.

Rio Arriba County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Rio Arriba County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 40,246. Its county seat is Tierra Amarilla. Its northern border is the Colorado state line.

Otero County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Otero County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 63,797. Its county seat is Alamogordo. Its southern boundary is the Texas state line. It is named for Miguel Antonio Otero, the territorial governor when the county was created.

Los Alamos County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Los Alamos County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,950. The smallest county in area of this state was administered exclusively by the U.S. federal government during the Manhattan Project, but now has equal status to New Mexico's other counties. The county has two population centers known as CDPs: Los Alamos and White Rock.

Guadalupe County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Guadalupe County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,687, making it the fifth-least populous county in New Mexico. Its county seat is Santa Rosa.

Cibola County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Cibola County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,213. Its county seat is Grants. It is New Mexico's youngest county, and the third youngest county in the United States, created on June 19, 1981, from the westernmost four-fifths of the formerly much larger Valencia County.

Sunrise Manor, Nevada Unincorporated town in Nevada, United States

Sunrise Manor is an unincorporated town and part of Las Vegas Township in Clark County, Nevada, United States, located on the western base of Frenchman Mountain, east of Las Vegas. The population was 189,372 at the 2010 census. If Sunrise Manor were to be incorporated, it would be one of the largest cities in Nevada. Sunrise Manor was formed in May 1957.

Winchester, Nevada Census-designated place in Nevada, United States

Winchester is an unincorporated town and census-designated place (CDP) and part of Las Vegas Township in Clark County, Nevada, United States that contains part of the Las Vegas Strip. It is one of a number of CDPs in the unincorporated urbanized area directly south of Las Vegas. The population was 27,978 at the 2010 census. It is governed by the Clark County Commission with advice from the Winchester Town Advisory Board. "Winchester, NV" does not appear in postal addresses; the United States Postal Service has assigned "Las Vegas, NV" as the place name for the ZIP codes containing Winchester.

Loving, New Mexico Village in New Mexico, United States

Loving is a village in Eddy County, New Mexico, United States. As of the 2010 census, the village population was 1,413.

Pecos, New Mexico Village in New Mexico, United States

Pecos is a village in San Miguel County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 1,441 at the 2000 census, growing much faster than in other parts of San Miguel County, partly because Pecos is within commuting distance of Santa Fe. The village is built along the Pecos River, which flows from the north out of the Santa Fe National Forest. Notable locations nearby include Pecos National Historical Park, Glorieta Pass, Pecos Benedictine Monastery, and Lisboa Springs Trout Hatchery. It is also an entry point for hunting, fishing, hiking and camping in the Pecos Wilderness. The closest metropolitan area is the Santa Fe metropolitan area, approximately 26 miles (42 km) to the west.

Toyah, Texas Town in Texas, United States

Toyah is a town in Reeves County, Texas, United States. The population was 90 at the 2010 census.

Mosquero, New Mexico Village in New Mexico, United States

Mosquero is a village in Harding and San Miguel counties in the U.S. state of New Mexico. The population was 93 at the 2010 census, down from 120 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Harding County; only a small portion of the village extends into San Miguel County.

San Diego, Texas City in Texas, United States

San Diego is a city in Duval and Jim Wells counties, Texas, United States. The population was 4,488 at the 2010 census. It is located primarily in Duval County, of which it is the county seat.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 30, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 1, 2015. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  4. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  6. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  7. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  8. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  9. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  10. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  11. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  12. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  13. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2016.
  14. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 2, 2018.

Coordinates: 35°28′N104°50′W / 35.47°N 104.83°W / 35.47; -104.83