Bizcochito

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Biscochito
Fresh batch of Biscochitos, Albuquerque NM.jpg
A fresh batch of biscochitos
Alternative namesBiscochito
Type Cookie
Place of origin Santa Fe de Nuevo México
Region or state New Mexico
Main ingredients Butter or pork lard, [1] anise, cinnamon, flour

Biscochitos or bizcochitos are a crisp lard- or butter-based cookie, flavored with cinnamon [2] and anise. [3] The name is a Spanish diminutive form of bizcocho. The dough is rolled and traditionally cut into the shape of stars and crescent moons.

Lard pig fat in both its rendered and unrendered forms

Lard is fat from a pig, in both its rendered and unrendered forms. It is a semi-soft white fat derived from fatty parts of the pig, with a high saturated fatty acid content and no trans fat. Rendering is by steaming, boiling, or dry heat. The culinary qualities of lard vary somewhat depending on the origin and processing method. At retail, refined lard is usually sold as paper-wrapped blocks.

Butter dairy product

Butter is a dairy product with high butterfat content which is solid when chilled and at room temperature in some regions, and liquid when warmed. It is made by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk to separate the butterfat from the buttermilk. It is generally used as a spread on plain or toasted bread products and a condiment on cooked vegetables, as well as in cooking, such as baking, sauce making, and pan frying. Butter consists of butterfat, milk proteins and water, and often added salt.

Cookie Baked food that is small, flat and sweetened (biscuit)

A cookie is a baked or cooked food that is typically small, flat and sweet. It usually contains flour, sugar and some type of oil or fat. It may include other ingredients such as raisins, oats, chocolate chips, nuts, etc.

Contents

The cookie was developed by residents of New Mexico [4] over the centuries from the first Spanish colonists [5] of what was then known as Santa Fe de Nuevo México. The recipe for making the cookie has been greatly influenced not only by local and indigenous customs but also by recipes brought to New Mexico by immigrants from other Hispanic countries.

New Mexico State of the United States of America

New Mexico is a state in the Southwestern region of the United States of America; its capital and cultural center is Santa Fe, which was founded in 1610 as capital of Nuevo México, while its largest city is Albuquerque with its accompanying metropolitan area. It is one of the Mountain States and shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and Arizona; its other neighboring states are Oklahoma to the northeast, Texas to the east-southeast, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua to the south and Sonora to the southwest. With a population around two million, New Mexico is the 36th state by population. With a total area of 121,592 sq mi (314,920 km2), it is the fifth-largest and sixth-least densely populated of the 50 states. Due to their geographic locations, northern and eastern New Mexico exhibit a colder, alpine climate, while western and southern New Mexico exhibit a warmer, arid climate.

Spanish colonization of the Americas Overseas expansion under the Crown of Castile

The overseas expansion under the Crown of Castile was initiated under the royal authority and first accomplished by the Spanish conquistadors. The Americas were incorporated into the Spanish Empire, with the exception of Brazil, Canada, the eastern United States and several other small countries in South America and The Caribbean. The crown created civil and religious structures to administer the region. The motivations for colonial expansion were trade and the spread of the Catholic faith through indigenous conversions.

Santa Fe de Nuevo México province of New Spain (1598-1821), territory of Mexico (1821-1846), provisional government of the USA (1846-1850)

Santa Fe de Nuevo México was a province of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, and later a territory of independent Mexico. The first capital was San Juan de los Caballeros from 1598 until 1610, and from 1610 onward the capital was La Villa Real de la Santa Fe de San Francisco de Asís. The naming, capital, the Palace of the Governors, and rule of law were retained as the New Mexico Territory, and the subsequent U.S. State of New Mexico, became a part of the United States. The New Mexican citizenry, primarily consisting of Hispano, Pueblo, Navajo, Apache, and Comanche peoples, became citizens of the United States as a result of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

Biscochitos are served during special celebrations, such as wedding receptions, baptisms, and religious holidays (especially during the Christmas season). [2] [6] It is commonly served along with hot chocolate. [6] The cookie is seldom known outside the boundaries of the original Spanish province, although Spanish speakers may recognize the association with bizcocho, from the name, and may have some idea of what they must be, even if they have not encountered them before.[ citation needed ]

Wedding reception party after a wedding

A wedding reception is a party usually held after the completion of a marriage ceremony as hospitality for those who have attended the wedding, hence the name reception: the couple receive society, in the form of family and friends, for the first time as a married couple. Hosts provide their choice of food and drink, although a wedding cake is popular. Entertaining guests after a wedding ceremony is traditional in most societies, and can last anywhere from half an hour to many hours or even days. Most wedding receptions are made in the evening for dinner however, the couple may opt for a luncheon, brunch, or even afternoon tea. Ultimately the married couple chooses the details and location of the reception.

Christmas holiday originating in Christianity, usually celebrated on December 25 (in the Gregorian or Julian calendars)

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed on December 25 as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world. A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night; in some traditions, Christmastide includes an octave. Christmas Day is a public holiday in many of the world's nations, is celebrated religiously by a majority of Christians, as well as culturally by many non-Christians, and forms an integral part of the holiday season centered around it.

Hot chocolate Heated beverage of chocolate in milk or water

Hot chocolate, also known as drinking chocolate, cocoa, and as chocolate tea in Nigeria, is a heated drink consisting of shaved chocolate, melted chocolate or cocoa powder, heated milk or water, and usually a sweetener. Hot chocolate may be topped with whipped cream or marshmallows. Hot chocolate made with melted chocolate is sometimes called drinking chocolate, characterized by less sweetness and a thicker consistency.

In 1989, the U.S. State of New Mexico made the biscochito its official state cookie. [6] [3] This act made New Mexico the first U.S. state to have an official state cookie. [3] [7] It was chosen to help maintain traditional home-baked cookery.

See also

New Mexican cuisine cuisine originating from New Mexico

New Mexican cuisine is the cuisine of the Southwestern US state of New Mexico, the region is primarily known for its fusion of Pueblo Native American with Hispano Spanish and Mexican cuisine originating in Nuevo México. This cuisine had adaptions and influences throughout its history, including early on from the nearby Apache, Navajo, and throughout New Spain and the Spanish Empire, also from French, Italian, Mediterranean, Portuguese cuisine, and European cafés, furthermore during the American territorial phase from cowboy chuckwagons and Western saloons, additionally after statehood from Route 66 American diners, fast food restaurants, and global cuisine. Even so, New Mexican cuisine developed in fairly isolated circumstances, which has allowed it to maintain its indigenous, Spanish, and Mexican identity, and is therefore not like any other Latin food originating in the contiguous United States.

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<i>Hors doeuvre</i> food items served before the main courses of a meal

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Sangria wine punch

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Newtons (cookie)

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Guacamole Mexican avocado-based dip, spread, or salad

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Ladyfinger (biscuit) biscuit

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Bizcocho

Bizcocho is the name given in the Spanish-speaking world to a wide range of pastries, cakes or cookies. The exact product to which the word bizcocho is applied varies widely depending on the region and country. For instance, in Spain bizcocho is exclusively used to refer to sponge cake. In turn, in Uruguay, most buttery flaky pastry including croissants are termed bizcocho, whilst sponge cake is called bizcochuelo. In turn, in Chile, Dominican Republic or Bolivia bizcocho refers to a sweet dough (masa) baked with local ingredients, not dissimilar from the bizcocho from Spain. In Ecuador the dough of a bizcocho can either be sweet or salty. The US state New Mexico is unusual in using the diminutive form of the name, bizcochito, as the name for a locally developed and very popular cookie.

Russian tea cake

Russian tea cake is a kind of pastry, often eaten around Christmas in the United States. It is a form of jumble, a pastry common in England during the Middle Ages. Similar varieties are known as Mexican wedding cakes , Italian wedding cookies, butterballs, and occasionally snowball cookies or “pecan Susans” for their powdery white spherical appearance when appearing around the winter holidays.

Burrito Mexican dish consisting of a wheat flour tortilla wrapped or folded into a cylindrical shape to completely enclose the filling

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Cheese soup

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Carrot soup soup

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Tamale pie

Tamale pie is a pie and casserole dish in the cuisine of the Southwestern United States. It is prepared with a cornmeal crust and ingredients typically used in tamales. It has been described as a comfort food. The dish, invented sometime in the early 1900s in the United States, may have originated in Texas, and its first known published recipe dates to 1911.

<i>Sopa de fideo</i>

Sopa de fideo, also referred to as sopita de fideo, is a stock-based noodle soup that is a part of the cuisines of Mexico, Tex-Mex cuisine and Cavite, a province in the Philippines. It has been suggested that the dish may have originated in Spain.

References

  1. Hudgens, T. (2011). The Commonsense Kitchen: 500 Recipes + Lessons for a Hand-Crafted Life. Chronicle Books LLC. p. 542. ISBN   978-1-4521-0033-3 . Retrieved January 26, 2015.
  2. 1 2 Cobos, R. (2003). A Dictionary of New Mexico and Southern Colorado Spanish: Revised and Expanded Edition. Museum of New Mexico Press. p. 33. ISBN   978-0-89013-537-2 . Retrieved January 26, 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 "State Symbols". state.nm.us. Retrieved 26 January 2015.
  4. "NewMaxico, Biscochitos Recipe" . Retrieved 26 January 2015.
  5. Eisenstadt, P.; Belshaw, J. (2012). A Woman in Both Houses: My Career in New Mexico Politics. University of New Mexico Press. ISBN   978-0-8263-5025-1 . Retrieved January 26, 2015.
  6. 1 2 3 Brown, W.; Cogan, J. (2014). United Cakes of America: Recipes Celebrating Every State. ABRAMS. p. 305. ISBN   978-1-61312-795-7 . Retrieved January 26, 2015.
  7. Smith, A.F. (2007). The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink. Oxford Companions. Oxford University Press, USA. ISBN   978-0-19-530796-2 . Retrieved January 26, 2015.