Seal of Montana

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Great Seal of the State of Montana
Montana-StateSeal.svg
Versions
Montana territory coat of arms (illustrated, 1876).jpg
Territorial and state historical coat of arms (1876)
Armiger State of Montana
Adopted1865
Motto Oro y plata

The Great Seal of the State of Montana was adopted in 1865, when Montana was a United States Territory. When it became a state in 1889, it was decided to use the same seal. In 1891, proposals were made to make changes or adopt a brand new seal. None of these proposals passed legislation. The outer ring of the seal contains the text "The Great Seal of the State of Montana". The inner circle depicts a landscape of mountains, plains and forests by the Great Falls on the Missouri River. A plow, a pick and a shovel are depicted on the front, representing the state's industry. [1] The banner at the bottom of the seal reads the territorial motto of Oro y Plata, meaning "Gold and Silver" in Spanish. [2]

Great Falls (Missouri River) series of waterfalls on the Missouri River

The Great Falls of the Missouri River are a series of waterfalls on the upper Missouri River in north-central Montana in the United States. From upstream to downstream, the five falls, which are located along a 10-mile (16 km) segment of the river, are:

Missouri River major river in the central United States, tributary of the Mississippi

The Missouri River is the longest river in North America. Rising in the Rocky Mountains of western Montana, the Missouri flows east and south for 2,341 miles (3,767 km) before entering the Mississippi River north of St. Louis, Missouri. The river drains a sparsely populated, semi-arid watershed of more than 500,000 square miles (1,300,000 km2), which includes parts of ten U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. Although nominally considered a tributary of the Mississippi, the Missouri River above the confluence is much longer and carries a comparable volume of water. When combined with the lower Mississippi River, it forms the world's fourth longest river system.

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References

  1. "Symbols of Montana". Montana Historical Society. Archived from the original on 28 August 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  2. "Montana State Motto". NSTATE, LLC. Retrieved 24 September 2010.