Arizona Superior Court

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The Superior Court of the State of Arizona is the Arizona state court of general jurisdiction.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.


A court of general jurisdiction is a court with authority to hear cases of all kinds – criminal, civil, family, probate, and so forth.

Contents

Jurisdiction

The Constitution of Arizona provides the Superior Court with jurisdiction over: [1]

The Constitution of the State of Arizona is the governing document and framework for the U.S. state of Arizona. The current constitution is the first and only adopted by the state of Arizona.

Concurrent jurisdiction exists where two or more courts from different systems simultaneously have jurisdiction over a specific case. This situation leads to forum shopping, as parties will try to have their civil or criminal case heard in the court that they perceive will be most favorable to them.

In law, possession is the control a person's intentional exercises toward a thing. In all cases, to possess something, a person must have an intention to possess it. A person may be in possession of some property. Like ownership, the possession of anything is commonly regulated by country under property law.

Real property legal term; property consisting of land and the buildings on it

In English common law, real property, real estate, realty, or immovable property is land which is the property of some person and all structures integrated with or affixed to the land, including crops, buildings, machinery, wells, dams, ponds, mines, canals, and roads, among other things. The term is historic, arising from the now-discontinued form of action, which distinguished between real property disputes and personal property disputes. Personal property was, and continues to be, all property that is not real property.

Divisions

Under Article 6, section 13, of the Arizona Constitution, "[t]he superior courts provided for in this section shall constitute a single court, composed of all the duly elected or appointed judges in each of the counties of the state." [2] In this sense, the single Superior Court of the State of Arizona is divided into fifteen divisions, conterminous with the fifteen counties of Arizona. Officially, each Superior Court division is styled the "Superior Court of the State of Arizona in and for the County of (County)". [3] For example, the Superior Court division located in Coconino County is officially the, "Superior Court of the State of Arizona in and for the County of Coconino." [3] However, since each county elects the sheriff, clerk, attorney, public defender, legal defender, and attorney of its branch and owns and operates the building(s) in which it is located, they are authorized to use variations of the name in informal documents. For example, Maricopa County refers to its branch as "The Judicial Branch of Arizona in Maricopa County."

Coconino County, Arizona County in the United States

Coconino County is a county located in the north central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. The population was 134,421 at the 2010 census. The county seat is Flagstaff. The county takes its name from Cohonino, a name applied to the Havasupai. It is the second-largest county by area in the contiguous United States, behind San Bernardino County, California, with its 18,661 square miles (48,300 km2), or 16.4% of Arizona's total area, making it larger than each of the nine smallest states.

Maricopa County, Arizona County in the United States

Maricopa County is a county in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated its population was 4,307,033 as of 2017, making it the state's most populous county, and the fourth-most populous in the United States. It is more populous than 23 states. The county seat is Phoenix, the state capital and fifth-most populous city in the United States.

See also

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References

  1. "Superior Court". Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts . Retrieved 22 June 2014.
  2. "Article 6, section 13, Arizona Constitution". Arizona Legislature. Retrieved 28 June 2012.
  3. 1 2 "Arizona Revised Statutes §12-126". Arizona Legislature. Retrieved 28 June 2012.