Football at the Asian Games

Last updated
Football at the Asian Games - Men's tournament
Founded1951
Region AFC (Asia)
Current championsFlag of South Korea.svg  South Korea (2018)
Most successful team(s)Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea (5 titles)
Soccerball current event.svg Men's Football at the 2018 Asian Games

Men's football has been a part of the Asian Games sporting events since the 1951 edition. Women's football competition began in 1990.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Asian Games multi-sport event

The Asian Games, also known as Asiad, is a continental multi-sport event held every four years among athletes from all over Asia. The Games were regulated by the Asian Games Federation (AGF) from the first Games in New Delhi, India, until the 1978 Games. Since the 1982 Games, they have been organized by the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA), after the breakup of the Asian Games Federation. The Games are recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and are described as the second largest multi-sport event after the Olympic Games.

1951 Asian Games first edition of the Asian Games

The 1951 Asian Games, officially known as the First Asian Games, was a multi-sport event celebrated in New Delhi, India from 4 to 11 March 1951. The Games received names like First Asiad and 1951 Asiad. A total of 489 athletes representing 11 Asian National Olympic Committees (NOCs) participated in 57 events from eight sports and discipline. The Games was the successor of the Far Eastern Games and the revival of the Western Asiatic Games. The 1951 Asiad were originally scheduled to be held in 1950, but postponed until 1951 due to delays in preparations. On 13 February 1949, the Asian Games Federation was formally established in Delhi, with Delhi unanimously announced as the first host city of the Asian Games.

Contents

Since the 2002 Asian Games, age limit for men teams is under-23 plus up to three over aged players for each squad, [1] same as the age limit in football competitions at the Summer Olympics. Although Kazakhstan is a member of the Olympic Council of Asia, the football team has been a member of the UEFA since 2002. The same rule applies to the Guam and Australia who are members of the AFC, but they are members of Oceania National Olympic Committees.

2002 Asian Games 14th edition of the Asian Games

The 2002 Asian Games, also known as the XIV Asiad, were an international multi-sport event held in Busan, South Korea from September 29 to October 14, 2002 with the football event commenced 2 days before the opening ceremony.

Football at the Summer Olympics

Association football has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program in 1996.

Olympic Council of Asia organization

The Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) is a governing body of sports in Asia, currently with 45 member National Olympic Committees. The current president is Sheikh Fahad Al-Sabah. The oldest NOCs are from Japan and the Philippines, recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1911; whereas East Timor is the newest, joining in 2003. The headquarters of the OCA is located at Kuwait City.

Men's tournaments

Summaries

YearHostFinalThird Place
Gold MedalScoreSilver MedalBronze MedalScoreFourth Place
1951
details
Flag of India.svg
New Delhi, India
Flag of India.svg
India
1–0State Flag of Iran (1925).svg
Iran
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Japan
2–0Flag of Afghanistan.svg
Afghanistan
1954
details
Flag of the Philippines (navy blue).svg
Manila, Philippines
Flag of the Republic of China.svg
Republic of China
5–2Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).svg
South Korea
Flag of Burma (1948-1974).svg
Burma
5–4Flag of Indonesia.svg
Indonesia
1958
details
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Tokyo, Japan
Flag of the Republic of China.svg
Republic of China
3–2Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).svg
South Korea
Flag of Indonesia.svg
Indonesia
4–1Flag of India.svg
India
1962
details
Flag of Indonesia.svg
Jakarta, Indonesia
Flag of India.svg
India
2–1Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).svg
South Korea
Flag of Malaya.svg
Malaya
4–1Flag of South Vietnam.svg
South Vietnam
1966
details
Flag of Thailand.svg
Bangkok, Thailand
Flag of Burma (1948-1974).svg
Burma
1–0State Flag of Iran (1964).svg
Iran
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Japan
2–0Flag of Singapore.svg
Singapore
1970
details
Flag of Thailand.svg
Bangkok, Thailand
Flag of Burma (1948-1974).svg
Burma

Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).svg
South Korea
0–0 aet 1Flag of India.svg
India
1–0Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Japan
1974
details
State Flag of Iran (1964).svg
Tehran, Iran
State Flag of Iran (1964).svg
Iran
1–0Flag of Israel.svg
Israel
Flag of Malaysia.svg
Malaysia
2–1Flag of North Korea (1948-1992).svg
North Korea
1978
details
Flag of Thailand.svg
Bangkok, Thailand
Flag of North Korea (1948-1992).svg
North Korea

Flag of South Korea (1949-1984).svg
South Korea
0–0 aet 1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China PR
1–0Flag of Iraq (1963-1991); Flag of Syria (1963-1972).svg
Iraq
1982
details
Flag of India.svg
New Delhi, India
Flag of Iraq (1963-1991); Flag of Syria (1963-1972).svg
Iraq
1–0Flag of Kuwait.svg
Kuwait
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg
Saudi Arabia
2–02Flag of North Korea (1948-1992).svg
North Korea
1986
details
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
Seoul, South Korea
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
South Korea
2–0Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg
Saudi Arabia
Flag of Kuwait.svg
Kuwait
5–0Flag of Indonesia.svg
Indonesia
1990
details
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
Beijing, China
Flag of Iran.svg
Iran
0–0 aet
(4–1) pen
Flag of North Korea (1948-1992).svg
North Korea
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
South Korea
1–0Flag of Thailand.svg
Thailand
1994
details
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Hiroshima, Japan
Flag of Uzbekistan.svg
Uzbekistan
4–2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China PR
Flag of Kuwait.svg
Kuwait
2–1Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
South Korea
1998
details
Flag of Thailand.svg
Bangkok, Thailand
Flag of Iran.svg
Iran
2–0Flag of Kuwait.svg
Kuwait
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China PR
3–0Flag of Thailand.svg
Thailand
2002
details
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
Busan, South Korea
Flag of Iran.svg
Iran
2–1Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
South Korea
3–0Flag of Thailand.svg
Thailand
2006
details
Flag of Qatar.svg
Doha, Qatar
Flag of Qatar.svg
Qatar
1–0Flag of Iraq (2004-2008).svg
Iraq
Flag of Iran.svg
Iran
1–0 aet Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
South Korea
2010
details
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
Guangzhou, China
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
1–0Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg
United Arab Emirates
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
South Korea
4–3Flag of Iran.svg
Iran
2014
details
Flag of South Korea.svg
Incheon, South Korea
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
1–0 aet Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
Flag of Iraq.svg
Iraq
1–0Flag of Thailand.svg
Thailand
2018
details
Flag of Indonesia.svg
Indonesia
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
2–1 aet Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg
United Arab Emirates
1–1
(4–3 pen.)
Flag of Vietnam.svg
Vietnam

*Under-23 tournament since 2002.
1 The title was shared.
2 Saudi Arabia were awarded the third-place playoff by default after the Korea DPR team were handed a two-year suspension for assaulting officials at the end of their semi-final.

Medal table

TeamGoldSilverBronze
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 5 (1970, 1978, 1986*, 2014*, 2018)3 (1954, 1958, 1962)3 (1990, 2002*, 2010)
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran 4 (1974*, 1990, 1998, 2002)2 (1951, 1966)1 (2006)
Flag of India.svg  India 2 (1951*, 1962)1 (1970)
Flag of Myanmar.svg  Myanmar 2 (1966, 1970)1 (1954)
Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei 2 (1954, 1958)
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1 (2010)2 (2002, 2018)2 (1951, 1966)
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 1 (1978)2 (1990, 2014)
Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq 1 (1982)1 (2006)1 (2014)
Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 1 (2006*)
Flag of Uzbekistan.svg  Uzbekistan 1 (1994)
Flag of Kuwait.svg  Kuwait 2 (1982, 1998)2 (1986, 1994)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1 (1994)2 (1978, 1998)
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 1 (1986)1 (1982)
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg  United Arab Emirates 1 (2010)1 (2018)
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 1 (1974)
Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 2 (1962, 1974)
Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 1 (1958)
* = host

Women's tournaments

Summaries

The first women's tournament was held in the 1990 Asian Games. [2]

1990 Asian Games 11th edition of the Asian Games

The 11th Asian Games, also known as the XI Asiad and the 11th Asian Games, were held from September 22 to October 7, 1990, in Beijing, China. This was the first Asian Games held in China.

YearHostFinalThird place match
WinnerScoreRunner-up3rd placeScore4th place
1990
details
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
Beijing
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
No playoffsFlag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Japan
Flag of North Korea (1948-1992).svg
North Korea
No playoffsFlag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg
Chinese Taipei
1994
details
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Hiroshima
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
2–0Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Japan
Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg
Chinese Taipei
No playoffsFlag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
South Korea
1998
details
Flag of Thailand.svg
Bangkok
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
1–0 aet Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Japan
2–1Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg
Chinese Taipei
2002
details
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
Busan
Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
No playoffsFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
No playoffsFlag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
South Korea
2006
details
Flag of Qatar.svg
Doha
Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
0–0 aet
(4–2) pen
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
2–0Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
South Korea
2010
details
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
Guangzhou
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
1–0Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg
South Korea
2–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
2014
details
Flag of South Korea.svg
Incheon
Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
3–1Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
3–0Flag of Vietnam.svg
Vietnam
2018
details
Flag of Indonesia.svg
Palembang
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
1–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
4–0Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg
Chinese Taipei

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References

  1. "PFF chief names Akhtar as head coach of Asian Games team". The Nation. August 29, 2010. Retrieved September 26, 2011. Faisal Saleh Hayat have confirmed that since 2002, football at the Asian Games changed to age-limit and now it is a "U-23 + 3 overage" tournament.
  2. "Asian Games (Women's Tournament)". RSSSF. Retrieved 21 November 2014.