Football at the Central American and Caribbean Games

Last updated
Football at the Central American and Caribbean Games
Founded 1930 (men's)
2010 (women's)
Region Central America
Caribbean
Number of teams 8 (women's)
8 (men's)
Current championsFlag of Colombia.svg  Colombia (men's)
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico (women's)
Most successful team(s)Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico (men's)
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico (women's)
Soccerball current event.svg Football at the 2018 Central American and Caribbean Games

Association football is one of the sports played at the Central American and Caribbean Games , a quadrennial multi-sports event for countries in those regions. The Games can involve eligible national teams from two football confederations, CONCACAF and CONMEBOL.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

The Central American and Caribbean Games are a multi-sport regional championship event, held quadrennial, typically in the middle (even) year between Summer Olympics. The Games are for countries in Central America, the Caribbean, Mexico, and the South American Caribbean countries of Colombia, Guyana, Suriname, and Venezuela.

CONCACAF International sport governing body

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football is the continental governing body for association football in North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean region. Three geographically South American entities — the independent nations of Guyana and Suriname and the French overseas department of French Guiana — are also members. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

Contents

A men's tournament was first held in the second edition of the Games in 1930.

The first women's event was held in 2010. In 2010, only a women's tournament was played, but both men's and women's events have been held in subsequent editions. The women's tournament is for senior national women's teams.

The following is a summary of the football championships at the Central American and Caribbean Games.

Tournament history

Source:

Men's tournament

The men's tournament has changed several times regarding player eligibility.

In the first men's tournaments, full senior squads competed, but now the men's tournament is only for under-20 teams.

In full:

Football at the 1930 Central American and Caribbean Games

The football tournament at the 1930 Central American and Caribbean Games was held in Havana from 16 March to 4 April.

Football at the 1946 Central American and Caribbean Games

The football tournament at the 1946 Central American and Caribbean Games was held in Barranquilla from 9 to 21 December. Cuba and Mexico withdrew.

Football was contested for men only at the 1950 Central American and Caribbean Games in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

Men's medallists

YearHostGold medal gameBronze medal game
Gold MedalistsScoreSilver MedalistsBronze MedalistsScore4th place
1930
Details
Flag of Cuba.svg
Havana
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
Flag of Honduras.svg
Honduras
Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador
1935
Details
Flag of El Salvador.svg
San Salvador
Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).png
Mexico
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
1938
Details
Flag of Panama.svg
Panama City
Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).png
Mexico
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador
1946
Details
Flag of Colombia.svg
Barranquilla
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Flag of Panama.svg
Panama
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Curaçao
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
1950
Details
Flag of Guatemala.svg
Guatemala City
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Curaçao
Flag of Guatemala.svg
Guatemala
Flag of Honduras.svg
Honduras
Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador
1954
Details
Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).png
Mexico City
Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador
Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).png
Mexico
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Flag of Panama.svg
Panama
1959
Details
Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Caracas
Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).png
Mexico
Flag of the Netherlands Antilles.svg
Netherlands Antilles
Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Panama.svg
Panama
1962
Details
Flag of Jamaica.svg
Kingston
Flag of the Netherlands Antilles.svg
Netherlands Antilles
Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).png
Mexico
Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Jamaica.svg
Jamaica
1966
Details
Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg
San Juan
Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).png
Mexico
Flag of the Netherlands Antilles.svg
Netherlands Antilles
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador
1970
Details
Flag of Panama.svg
Panama City
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
Flag of the Netherlands Antilles.svg
Netherlands Antilles
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Venezuela
1974
Details
Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg
Santo Domingo
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
1–1Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago
Flag of Bermuda.svg
Bermuda
3–0Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
1978
Details
Flag of Colombia.svg
Medellín
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
2–0Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Bermuda.svg
Bermuda
3–0Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
1982
Details
Flag of Cuba.svg
Havana
Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Venezuela
1–0Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
2–1Flag of Bermuda.svg
Bermuda
1986
Details
Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg
Santiago
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
1–1Flag of Honduras.svg
Honduras
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
2–1Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg
Dominican Republic
1990
Details
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico City
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
3–0Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
2–1Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
1993
Details
Flag of Puerto Rico (1952-1995).svg
Ponce
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
2–0Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of Jamaica.svg
Jamaica
3–1Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
1998
Details
Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Maracaibo
Flag of Venezuela (1954-2006).svg
Venezuela
3–1Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
6–1Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago
2002
Details
Flag of El Salvador.svg
San Salvador
Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador
1–1Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
0–0Flag of Haiti.svg
Haiti
2006
Details
Flag of Colombia.svg
Cartagena
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
2–1Flag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
1–0Flag of Honduras.svg
Honduras
2010
Details
Flag of Puerto Rico.svg
Mayagüez
Football tournament cancelled
2014
Details
Flag of Mexico.svg
Veracruz
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
4–1Flag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Cuba.svg
Cuba
3–1Flag of Honduras.svg
Honduras
2018
Details
Flag of Colombia.svg
Barranquilla
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
2–1Flag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Honduras.svg
Honduras
3–0Flag of Haiti.svg
Haiti

Women's tournament

The women's tournament is for senior national teams, and was established at the 2010 Central American and Caribbean Games.

2010 Central American and Caribbean Games

The 21st Central American and Caribbean Games took place in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, from 18 July 2010 to 1 August 2010.

Women's medallists

YearHostGold medal gameBronze medal game
Gold MedalistsScoreSilver MedalistsBronze MedalistsScore4th place
2010 [1]
Details
Flag of Puerto Rico.svg
Mayagüez
Flag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela
[A] Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago
Flag of Guatemala.svg
Guatemala
[A] Flag of Haiti.svg
Haiti
2014 [2]
Details
Flag of Mexico.svg
Veracruz
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
2–0Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
3–2Flag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela
2018
Details
Flag of Colombia.svg
Barranquilla
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
3–1Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
Flag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela
1–0Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago

Medal count

Men's

No.TeamGoldSilverBronze
1Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 661
2Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 503
3Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 303
4Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela 252
5Flag of the Netherlands Antilles.svg  Netherlands Antilles 231
6Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador 201
7Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 134
8Flag of Honduras.svg  Honduras 013
9Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 010
10Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 010
11Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 010
12Flag of Bermuda.svg  Bermuda 002
13Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 001

Women's

No.TeamGoldSilverBronze
1Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 200
2Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela 101
3Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 011
4Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 010
4Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 010
6Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 001

Footnotes

A.  ^ Final stage was a round-robin group.
B.  ^ The Colombian football team were awarded bronze medals in spite of having been thrown out of the tournament.[ when? ][ year missing ][ specify ]

See also

A men's football tournament is held at every Pan American Games since the first edition of the multi-sports event in 1951. A women's tournament was introduced in 1999.

The Central American Games football tournament is a football competition organised by UNCAF and ORDECA. It is scheduled to be held every four years.

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References