USS Waxbill (AMc-15)

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Waxbill (AMc-15).jpg
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Name: USS Waxbill
Launched: 1936, as Leslie J. Fulton
Acquired: 19 November 1940
Commissioned: 26 November 1940
Decommissioned: 12 September 1944
Struck: 14 October 1944
Fate: Transferred to the Maritime Commission for sale, 6 January 1945
General characteristics
Type: Coastal minesweeper
Displacement: 195 long tons (198 t)
Length: 83 ft 2 in (25.35 m)
Beam: 20 ft 11 in (6.38 m)
Draft: 5 ft (1.5 m)
Depth of hold: 10 ft (3.0 m)
Propulsion: Diesel engine
Speed: 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph)
Complement: 11
Armament: 1 × .30 cal (7.62 mm) machine gun

USS Waxbill (AMc-15) was a coastal minesweeper of the United States Navy. The ship was built as the commercial wooden-hulled purse seiner Leslie J. Fulton by F. L. Fulton, Antioch, California in 1936.

Coastal minesweeper is a term used by the United States Navy to indicate a minesweeper intended for coastal use as opposed to participating in fleet operations at sea.

United States Navy Naval warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the Navy is the third largest of the service branches. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March 2018, making it the second-largest air force in the world, after the United States Air Force.

Antioch, California City in California, United States

Antioch is the second largest city in Contra Costa County, California, United States. Located in the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area along the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta, it is a suburb of San Francisco and Oakland. The city's population was 102,372 at the 2010 census and estimated to be 110,542 in 2015.

Contents

World War II Pacific Ocean operations

Purchased by the U.S. Navy on 19 November 1940 for eventual conversion to a coastal minesweeper, she was commissioned as USS AMc-15 on 26 November 1940, and was named Waxbill the following day. Not yet fully equipped or manned, Waxbill operated in the 12th Naval District's waters, training naval reservists through to the end of 1940.

Decommissioned on 20 January 1941, the ship was attached to the inshore patrol forces of the district as of 1 January 1941, and entered the General Engineering and Drydock Co. yard at Alameda, California, on 20 January, for conversion to a coastal minesweeper. While at Alameda, the ship was recommissioned and placed in service on 19 February 1941.

Alameda, California City in California in the United States

Alameda is a city in Alameda County, California, United States. It is located on Alameda Island and Bay Farm Island, and is adjacent to and south of Oakland and east of San Francisco across the San Francisco Bay. Bay Farm Island, a portion of which is also known as "Harbor Bay Isle", is not actually an island, and is part of the mainland adjacent to the Oakland International Airport. The city's estimated 2017 population was 79,928. Alameda is a charter city, rather than a general law city, allowing the city to provide for any form of government. Alameda became a charter city and adopted a council–manager government in 1916, which it retains to the present.

Waxbill operated locally in the 12th Naval District attached, successively, to Patrol Force, Local Defense Forces and the Mine Force for the district until she was assigned to the Western Sea Frontier Force in August 1942.

Decommissioning

Reassigned to local defense forces of the district on 12 March 1943, she was eventually taken out of service on 12 September 1944 and was struck from the Navy List on 14 October 1944.

The Naval Vessel Register (NVR) is the official inventory of ships and service craft in custody of or titled by the United States Navy. It contains information on ships and service craft that make up the official inventory of the Navy from the time a vessel is authorized through its life cycle and disposal. It also includes ships that have been removed from the register, but not disposed of by sale, transfer to another government, or other means. Ships and service craft disposed of prior to 1987 are currently not included, but are gradually being added along with other updates.

Transferred to the Maritime Commission's War Shipping Administration on 6 January 1945, the erstwhile minecraft was simultaneously sold back to her original owner, F. L. Pulton.

War Shipping Administration government agency

The War Shipping Administration (WSA) was a World War II emergency war agency of the US government, tasked to purchase and operate the civilian shipping tonnage the US needed for fighting the war. Both shipbuilding under the Maritime Commission and ship allocation under the WSA to Army, Navy or civilian needs were closely coordinated though Vice Admiral Emory S. Land who continued as head of the Maritime Commission while also heading the WSA.

See also

The boat is named the "Fulpac One" and the Fulton Shipyard is in Antioch California.

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References

The ship was then turned into a fish tender, owned by James Fulton, and spent its dock time in the Fulton Shipyard where it was made. The time it spends working is off the coast of Alaska as a tender for Salmon and Herring runs.[ citation needed ]