Umkhonto we Sizwe (Spear of the Nation)

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Umkhonto we Sizwe
(Spear of the Nation)
Studio album by Prince Far I
Released 1984
Recorded Channel One Studios, Kingston, Jamaica
Genre Reggae
Length Tamoki Wambesi
Producer Roy Cousins

Umkhonto we Sizwe (Spear of the Nation) is a reggae album by Prince Far I, released in 1984 and which he was recording when he was murdered in 1983. [1] The album is named in honor of the fight of the militant wing of the ANC.

Reggae music genre from Jamaica

Reggae is a music genre that originated in Jamaica in the late 1960s.The term also denotes the modern popular music of Jamaica and its diaspora. A 1968 single by Toots and the Maytals, "Do the Reggay" was the first popular song to use the word "reggae," effectively naming the genre and introducing it to a global audience. While sometimes used in a broad sense to refer to most types of popular Jamaican dance music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that was strongly influenced by traditional mento as well as American jazz and rhythm and blues, especially the New Orleans R&B practiced by Fats Domino and Allen Toussaint, and evolved out of the earlier genres ska and rocksteady. Reggae usually relates news, social gossip, and political comment. Reggae spread into a commercialized jazz field, being known first as ‘Rudie Blues’, then ‘Ska’, later ‘Blue Beat’, and ‘Rock Steady’. It is instantly recognizable from the counterpoint between the bass and drum downbeat, and the offbeat rhythm section. The immediate origins of reggae were in ska and rocksteady; from the latter, reggae took over the use of the bass as a percussion instrument.

Album collection of recorded music, words, sounds

An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a collection on compact disc (CD), vinyl, audio tape, or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century as individual 78-rpm records collected in a bound book resembling a photograph album; this format evolved after 1948 into single vinyl LP records played at ​33 13 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s.

Prince Far I was a Jamaican reggae deejay, producer and a Rastafarian. He was known for his gruff voice and critical assessment of the Jamaican government. His track "Heavy Manners" used lyrics against measures initiated towards violent crime.

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Jah Lloyd, aka Jah Lion, The Black Lion of Judah, and Jah Ali was a Jamaican reggae singer, deejay and producer.

Winston Jarrett Reggae singer

Winston Jarrett is a Jamaican reggae singer who was part of Alton Ellis's group The Flames in the 1960s before recording with The Righteous Flames and as a solo artist.

Track listing

All tracks composed by Michael Williams and Roy Cousins

  1. "Survival"
  2. "Survival Version"
  3. "Ask Ask"
  4. "Ask Ask Version"
  5. "African Queen"
  6. "African Queen Version"
  7. "Stop the War"
  8. "Stop the War Version"
  9. "Jerry Doghead"
  10. "Jerry Doghead Version"
  11. "Special Request"
  12. "Special Request Version"

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References

  1. Katz, David:"Solid Foundation - An Oral History of Reggae", 2003, Bloomsbury, ISBN   0-7475-6847-2