Uncial 0322

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Uncial 0322

New Testament manuscript

Text Gospel of Mark
Date 5th through 9th-century [1]
Script Greek
Now at Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople
Size 30.5 × 24 cm (12.0 × 9.4 in)
Type mixed
Note palimpsest

Uncial 0322 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 8th or 9th-century.

Caspar René Gregory American-born German theologian

Caspar René Gregory was an American-born German theologian.

Kurt Aland German Theologian

Kurt Aland, was a German theologian and biblical scholar who specialized in New Testament textual criticism. He founded the Institut für neutestamentliche Textforschung in Münster and served as its first director from 1959–83. He was one of the principal editors of Nestle-Aland – Novum Testamentum Graece for the Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft and The Greek New Testament for the United Bible Societies.

Manuscript document written by hand

A manuscript was, traditionally, any document that is written by hand -- or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten -- as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way. More recently, the term has come to be understood to further include any written, typed, or word-processed copy of an author's work, as distinguished from its rendition as a printed version of the same. Before the arrival of printing, all documents and books were manuscripts. Manuscripts are not defined by their contents, which may combine writing with mathematical calculations, maps, explanatory figures or illustrations. Manuscripts may be in book form, scrolls or in codex format. Illuminated manuscripts are enriched with pictures, border decorations, elaborately embossed initial letters or full-page illustrations. A document should be at least 75 years old to be considered a manuscript.

Contents

Description

The codex contains a small part of the Gospel of Mark 3:17/18-4:1; 6:10-21/22 on 2 parchment leaves of size 30.5 × 24 cm (12.0 × 9.4 in). The text is written in two columns per page, 22 lines per page. Rubrication is 8th–9th century; text is possibly 5th–7th century. It is a palimpsest, the upper text contains Synaxarion. [2]

Gospel of Mark Books of the New Testament

The Gospel According to Mark is one of the four canonical gospels and one of the three synoptic gospels. It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter 16, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus. It portrays Jesus as a heroic man of action, an exorcist, a healer, and a miracle worker. Jesus is also the Son of God, but he keeps his identity secret, concealing it in parables so that even most of the disciples fail to understand. All this is in keeping with prophecy, which foretold the fate of the messiah as suffering servant. The gospel ends, in its original version, with the discovery of the empty tomb, a promise to meet again in Galilee, and an unheeded instruction to spread the good news of the resurrection.

Rubrication

Rubrication was one of several steps in the medieval process of manuscript making. Practitioners of rubrication, so-called rubricators or rubrishers, were specialized scribes who received text from the manuscript's original scribe and supplemented it with additional text in red ink for emphasis. The term rubrication comes from the Latin rubrico, "to color red".

Palimpsest manuscript page thats been used multiple times

In textual studies, a palimpsest is a manuscript page, either from a scroll or a book, from which the text has been scraped or washed off so that the page can be reused for another document. Pergamene was made of lamb, calf, or goat kid skin and was expensive and not readily available, so in the interest of economy a pergamene often was re-used by scraping the previous writing. In colloquial usage, the term palimpsest is also used in architecture, archaeology, and geomorphology to denote an object made or worked upon for one purpose and later reused for another, for example a monumental brass the reverse blank side of which has been re-engraved.

History

The manuscript is dated to the 8th or 9th-century. It was added to the list of New Testament manuscripts by the INTF in 2010. [2]

It is currently housed at the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople (Triados 68 (75)) in Istanbul. [2]

Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople autocephalous church of Eastern Orthodox Christianity

The Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople is one of the fifteen autocephalous churches that together compose the Eastern Orthodox Church. It is headed by the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, currently Bartholomew I, Archbishop of Constantinople.

Istanbul Metropolitan municipality in Marmara, Turkey

Istanbul, formerly known as Byzantium and Constantinople, is the most populous city in Turkey and the country's economic, cultural and historic center. Istanbul is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, straddling the Bosporus strait between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea. Its commercial and historical center lies on the European side and about a third of its population lives in suburbs on the Asian side of the Bosporus. With a total population of around 15 million residents in its metropolitan area, Istanbul is one of the world's most populous cities, ranking as the world's fourth largest city proper and the largest European city. The city is the administrative center of the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. Istanbul is viewed as a bridge between the East and West.

See also

Biblical manuscript

A biblical manuscript is any handwritten copy of a portion of the text of the Bible. Biblical manuscripts vary in size from tiny scrolls containing individual verses of the Jewish scriptures to huge polyglot codices containing both the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) and the New Testament, as well as extracanonical works.

Textual criticism branch of textual scholarship, philology, and literary criticism

Textual criticism is a branch of textual scholarship, philology, and literary criticism that is concerned with the identification of textual variants in either manuscripts or printed books. Scribes can make alterations when copying manuscripts by hand. Given a manuscript copy, several or many copies, but not the original document, the textual critic might seek to reconstruct the original text as closely as possible. The same processes can be used to attempt to reconstruct intermediate versions, or recensions, of a document's transcription history. The objective of the textual critic's work is a better understanding of the creation and historical transmission of texts. This understanding may lead to the production of a "critical edition" containing a scholarly curated text.

Uncial 0321, ε 2 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 5th-century. The manuscript has survived in very fragmentary condition.

Related Research Articles

Uncial 051, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the Book of Revelation, dated paleographically to the 10th century.

Uncial 067, ε 2 (Soden), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 6th century.

Uncial 0154, ε 074, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated palaeographically to the 9th century.

Uncial 0156, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, α 1006, dated palaeographically to the 8th century.

Uncial 0157, α 1007, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated palaeographically to the 7th century.

Uncial 0158, α 1039, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated palaeographically to the 5th century.

Uncial 0182, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 5th century.

Uncial 0229, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. The manuscript paleographically has been assigned to the 8th century. It is a palimpsest.

Uncial 0233, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. The manuscript paleographically had been assigned to the 8th-century.

Uncial 0237 manuscript of the New Testament

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Uncial 0244

Uncial 0244, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Paleographically it has been assigned to the fifth century.

Uncial 0279, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Paleographically it has been assigned to the eighth or ninth centuries.

Uncial 0280, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Paleographically it has been assigned to the 8th century.

Uncial 0287, is a Greek-Arabic uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Paleographically it has been assigned to the 9th century.

Uncial 0306, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Paleographically it has been assigned to the 9th century.

Uncial 0309, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Paleographically it had been assigned to the 6th-century.

Uncial 0310, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 6th-century.

Uncial 0311

Uncial 0311, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 8th or the 9th-century.

Uncial 0317, is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 7th-century, though it is not sure because text is too brief for certainty.

Uncial 0320, is a diglot Greek-Latin uncial manuscript of the New Testament on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 10th-century. Formerly it was designated by Dabs2. The manuscript is very lacunose.

References

  1. ""GA 0322"". http://www.csntm.org/manuscript/View/GA_032 . Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts. Retrieved October 8, 2016.External link in |website= (help)
  2. 1 2 3 "Liste Handschriften". Münster: Institute for New Testament Textual Research. Retrieved 16 November 2010.