United Nations Security Council Resolution 193

Last updated
UN Security Council
Resolution 193
Date August 9 1964
Meeting no. 1143
Code S/5868 (Document)
SubjectThe Cyprus Question
Voting summary
9 voted for
None voted against
2 abstained
Result Adopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council Resolution 193 was adopted on August 9, 1964. After a serious deterioration of the situation in Cyprus, the Council reaffirmed an appeal to Turkey, to cease bombarding the island, and to Cyprus, ordering all her armed forces to cease firing. The Council called upon all to co-operate fully with the Commander of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus and to refrain from any action that might exacerbate or broaden the hostilities.

United Nations Intergovernmental organization

The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization that was tasked to maintain international peace and security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international co-operation and be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations. The headquarters of the UN is in Manhattan, New York City, and is subject to extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, protecting human rights, delivering humanitarian aid, promoting sustainable development and upholding international law. The UN is the largest, most familiar, most internationally represented and most powerful intergovernmental organization in the world. In 24 October 1945, at the end of World War II, the organization was established with the aim of preventing future wars. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The UN is the successor of the ineffective League of Nations.

Turkey Republic in Western Asia

Turkey, officially the Republic of Turkey, is a transcontinental country located mainly in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe. East Thrace, located in Europe, is separated from Anatolia by the Sea of Marmara, the Bosphorous strait and the Dardanelles. Turkey is bordered by Greece and Bulgaria to its northwest; Georgia to its northeast; Armenia, the Azerbaijani exclave of Nakhchivan and Iran to the east; and Iraq and Syria to the south. Istanbul is the largest city, but more central Ankara is the capital. Approximately 70 to 80 per cent of the country's citizens identify as Turkish. Kurds are the largest minority; the size of the Kurdish population is a subject of dispute with estimates placing the figure at anywhere from 12 to 25 per cent of the population.

Cyprus Island country in Mediterranean

Cyprus, officially the Republic of Cyprus, is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean, located south of Turkey, west of Syria and Lebanon, northwest of Israel, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece.

Resolution 193 was adopted nine votes to none, with two abstentions from Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union.

Czechoslovakia 1918–1992 country in Central Europe, predecessor of the Czech Republic and Slovakia

Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia, was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

Soviet Union 1922–1991 country in Europe and Asia

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 30 December 1922 to 26 December 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. Other major urban centres were Leningrad, Kiev, Minsk, Alma-Ata, and Novosibirsk. It spanned over 10,000 kilometres east to west across 11 time zones, and over 7,200 kilometres north to south. It had five climate zones: tundra, taiga, steppes, desert and mountains.

See also

Cyprus dispute Inter-communal dispute and violence

The Cyprus dispute, also known as the Cyprus conflict, Cyprus issue, or Cyprus problem, is an ongoing dispute between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots in the aftermath of the 1974 Turkish military invasion and occupation of the northern third of Cyprus. Although the Republic of Cyprus is recognized as the sole legitimate state – sovereign over all the island – the north is under the de facto administration of the self-declared Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, which is guarded by Turkish Armed Forces. Only Turkey recognizes the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, while there is broad recognition that the ongoing military presence constitutes occupation of territories that belong to the Republic of Cyprus. According to the European Court of Human Rights, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus should be considered a puppet state under effective Turkish control.

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United Nations Security Council Resolution 354, adopted unanimously on 23 July 1974, was a brief resolution, it reaffirmed the provisions of resolution 353 and demanded that all parties to the fighting in Cyprus immediately comply with 353 and cease firing. The Resolution also requested all states to refrain from any action which might further aggravate the situation.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 355, adopted on 1 August 1974, recalled its resolutions 186, 353 and 354, noted that all States have declared their respect for Cyprus' sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity and requested the Secretary-General take appropriate action with regard to a possible cease-fire and report back to the Council. The resolution was looking to implement an end to the conflict sparked by the Turkish invasion of Cyprus.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 357, adopted unanimously on 14 August 1974, after reaffirming previous resolutions on the topic, the Council demanded that all parties present to the fighting in Cyprus cease all firing and military action. It called for the resumption of negotiations and decided to remain seized of the situation and on instant call to meet as necessary to consider what more effective measures may be required should the cease-fire fail.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 358, adopted unanimously on 15 August 1974, deeply concerned about the continuing violence and bloodshed in Cyprus and deploring the non-compliance with resolution 357, the Council recalled its previous resolutions on the matter and insisted on their full implementation and that all parties immediately and strictly observe the cease-fire.

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United Nations Security Council resolution 831, adopted on 27 May 1993, after reaffirming Resolution 186 (1964) and all subsequent resolutions on Cyprus, the Council discussed the financial situation surrounding the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP).

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United Nations Security Council resolution 1062, adopted unanimously on 28 June 1996, after recalling all resolutions on Cyprus, particularly resolutions 186 (1964), 939 (1994) and 1032 (1995), the Council expressed concern at the lack of progress in the political dispute in Cyprus and extended the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) until 31 December 1996.

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United Nations Security Council resolution 1092, adopted unanimously on 23 December 1996, after recalling all resolutions on Cyprus, particularly resolutions 186 (1964), 939 (1994) and 1062 (1996), the Council expressed concern at the deterioration of the political dispute in Cyprus and extended the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) until 30 June 1997.

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United Nations Security Council resolution 1251, adopted unanimously on 29 June 1999, after reaffirming all past resolutions on the situation in Cyprus, including resolutions 1217 (1998) and 1218 (1998), the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for a further six months until 15 December 1999.

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United Nations Security Council Resolution 1930, adopted on June 15, 2010, after reaffirming all resolutions on the situation in Cyprus, particularly Resolution 1251 (1999), the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for a further six months until December 15, 2010 while negotiations towards a settlement of the dispute on the island were underway.

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United Nations Security Council resolution 1416, adopted unanimously on 13 June 2002, after reaffirming all resolutions on the situation in Cyprus, including Resolution 1251 (1999), the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for a further six months until 15 December 2002.

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United Nations Security Council resolution 1604, adopted unanimously on 15 June 2005, after reaffirming all resolutions on the situation in Cyprus, particularly Resolution 1251 (1999), the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for an additional period until 15 December 2005.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1642, adopted unanimously on 14 December 2005, after reaffirming all resolutions on the situation in Cyprus, particularly Resolution 1251 (1999), the Council extended the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for an additional period until 15 June 2006.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1789 was unanimously adopted on 14 December 2007.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 2114 United Nations Security Council resolution

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