United States Mint coin sets

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The United States Mint has released annual collections of coins most years since 1936.

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United States Mint 50 State Quarters Proof Set

With the launch of the 50 State Quarters Program in 1999, the Mint began marketing proof sets of just the five quarters released in the given year. These sets are essentially a reduced version of the regular issue proof sets and the packaging maintained the same blue color scheme, but came in a smaller box and different certificate of authenticity. This collection ceased with the resolution of the program in 2008. These sets are usually denoted as the 5-piece sets from a given year. All issues were produced at the San Francisco Mint. [1]

United States Mint 50 State Quarters Silver Proof Set

The 50 State Quarters Proof Sets produced with the five quarters produced that year in 90% silver and again were the same as the year's Silver Proof Set but in a reduced red packaging and unique certificate of authenticity. All issues were produced at the San Francisco Mint. [2]

United States Mint America the Beautiful Quarters Proof Set

The America the Beautiful Quarters program began in 2010 as a continuation of the 50 State Quarters and D.C. and Territories programs, allowing each state a representation in the nation's coinage. These sets are reduced versions of the United States Mint Proof Set and the packaging maintains the same burnt-orange color scheme, but came in a smaller box and different certificate of authenticity. All issues were produced at the San Francisco Mint. [3]

United States Mint America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof Set

The 50 State Quarters Proof Sets are also produced in 90% silver and again are the same as the year's Silver Proof Set but in a reduced navy-blue packaging and unique certificate of authenticity. All issues were produced at the San Francisco Mint. [4]

United States Mint District of Columbia & U.S. Territories Quarters Proof Set

Upon completion of the 50 State Quarters Program, it was decided to honor Washington D.C. and the U.S. Overseas Territories in a similar manner. The District of Columbia and United States Territories Quarters allowed for the minting of six designs in 2009 and these were sold as a set. All were produced at the San Francisco Mint. [5]

United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin Proof Set

With the launch of the Presidential $1 Coin Program, four dollar coins were released each year from 2007-2016 - each depicting a serving U.S. President. [6] This set is the sleeve of dollar coins from regular issue mint sets on its own with reduced packaging and a different certificate of authenticity. The program ended in 2016 when all eligible presidents had been honored.

United States Prestige Coin Set

First released in 1983 and continued through 1997 missing only one year (1985), Prestige Sets contain proof strikings of the regular issue coinage in addition to the commemorative dollar and half dollar from the year of release. [7] The coins are presented in a book-like case with a special laminated enclosure of a different design than the standard proof set sleeves. This collection was marketed to give consumers a more "premium" option.

United States Mint Proof Set

This collection encompasses every coin design produced by the United States Mint in a single year. This is the longest-running series of coins produced by the Mint and comprises coins prepared using proof striking methods. [8] The Mint packages the specially prepared coins in hard plastic cases meant for long-term preservation.

All releases from 1936 to 1972 included the cent, nickel, dime, quarter, and half dollar from that year. The first proof sets through 1964 were minted at the Philadelphia Mint. There were two official releases in 1942: one regular five coin set and a set including a silver wartime nickel. United States currency was debased beginning in 1965, but the sets continued under the name United States Mint Proof Set. Production was moved to the San Francisco branch in 1968, and all subsequent issues bear coins with an "S" mint mark. In 1973, the Eisenhower dollar was added to the collection. Sets from 1975 will have a dual-date 1776-1976 quarter, half-dollar, and dollar as none of those coins were ever produced with a 1975 date. [9] The Susan B. Anthony dollar replaced the Eisenhower in 1979. The 1981 mint sets were the only method of obtaining an Anthony dollar from that year, though many have slipped into circulation. [10] With the cease in minting of dollar coins, the regular issue Proof Set for 1982 included a brass token. [11] From 1983 until 1998, the annual United States Proof set resumed to only issuing the cent, nickel, dime, quarter, and half-dollar.

With the introduction of the 50 State Quarters program in 1999, the Mint began issuing all five quarters released from that year with the already established denominations, thus creating a nine-coin set split across two holders, or lenses. [12] The single lens containing just the quarters was also sold separately. The following year, the Sacagawea dollar was included in the regular set, bringing the coin count to ten. [13] The Westward Journey Series of nickels saw the introduction of eleven coin sets in 2004 and 2005 featuring both nickels, the cent, dime, half dollar, golden dollar and all five quarters. The regular issue returned to ten coins in 2006, but the Presidential Dollar Coin Program necessitated an expansion to three lenses with a total of fourteen coins from 2007 to 2008. In 2009, another lens was added to facilitate the one-cent coins minted for the Lincoln Bicentennial collection. The one-cent coins produced for the proof sets that year were composed of a 95% copper alloy equivalent to the Lincoln cent's original composition. [14] This set peaked the coin count at eighteen as it also included that year's set of District of Columbia and United States Territories Quarters. [15] The regular release returned to a count of fourteen coins across three lenses in 2010 and the individual lens of America the Beautiful Quarters or Presidential Dollar Coins sold separate.

United States Mint Silver Proof Set

Beginning in 1992, the Mint began producing proof sets with the cupronickel denomination replaced by specimens struck with the pre-debasement composition: coin silver, or 90% Ag and 10% Cu. [16] All of the quarters released in any one year of a series since 1999 are also struck in silver. [17] Otherwise, these sets are largely similar to the standard United States Mint Proof Set, but are packaged with a red color scheme and different certificate of authenticity.

United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set

The Uncirculated Sets, or Mint Sets, contain specimens of coins that are typically minted for general circulation. The first such sets were sold in 1947 in cardboard panels with two coins for each issue, thus showing the obverse and reverse of each one. Such sets were, with the exception of 1950, annually produced through 1958. In 1959 a plastic soft pack of single coins was sold and these were annually offered through 1964. In 1965-7 "special mint sets", a higher level of uncirculated coins, replaced both mint and proof sets. With the exception of 1982-1983, mint sets have been issued every year since 1968. (For 1982 and 1983 collectors sometimes buy the annual "souvenir sets" struck by the Philadelphia and Denver mints, which are very similar to the official Treasury-issued mint sets. [18] )

Notable are the 1970, 1973, and 1996 mint sets. These contained the 1970-D Kennedy half dollar, [19] the 1973-P and 1973-D Eisenhower dollars, [20] and the 1996-W Roosevelt dime, [21] none of which were minted for general circulation and could be obtained only from the U.S. mint sets. More recent sets contain non-circulating half-dollar and dollar denominations. From the 2005 mint set coins through the 2010 mint set coins were prepared using special dies that produce a "satin finish" distinct from business strike coins. The US Mint reverted to coins that are typically minted for general circulation in 2011. Mint sets currently are sealed in a plastic blister-pack, unlike the flexible plastic packs of earlier sets. [22] They are usually sold in sets of two - one for each branch of production.

In 2017, the Mint released a special "Enhanced Uncirculated Mint Set", limited to a maximum mintage of 225,000 sets. The set sold out within seven minutes. [23]

Related Research Articles

Quarter (United States coin) Current denomination of United States currency

The quarter, short for quarter dollar, is a United States coin worth 25 cents, one-quarter of a dollar. It has a diameter of .955 inch (24.26 mm) and a thickness of .069 inch (1.75 mm). The coin sports the profile of George Washington on its obverse, and its reverse design has changed frequently. It has been produced on and off since 1796 and consistently since 1831.

Coins of the United States dollar were first minted in 1792. New coins have been produced annually and they make up a valuable aspect of the United States currency system. Today, circulating coins exist in denominations of 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, 50¢, and $1.00. Also minted are bullion and commemorative coins. All of these are produced by the United States Mint. The coins are then sold to Federal Reserve Banks which in turn are responsible for putting coins into circulation and withdrawing them as demanded by the country's economy.

United States Mint Produces circulating coinage for the United States

The United States Mint is a bureau of the Department of the Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion. It does not produce paper money; that responsibility belongs to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The first United States Mint was created in Philadelphia in 1792, and soon joined by other centers, whose coins were identified by their own mint marks. There are currently four active coin-producing mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point.

Dollar coin (United States) Current denomination of United States currency

The dollar coin is a United States coin with a face value of one United States dollar. It is the second largest U.S. coin currently minted for circulation in terms of physical size, with a diameter of 1.043 inches and a thickness of 0.079 in (2.0 mm), coming second to the half dollar. Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver, and base metal versions. Dollar coins were first minted in the United States in 1794. While true gold dollars are no longer minted, the Sacagawea, Presidential, and American Innovation dollars are sometimes referred to as golden dollars because of their color.

Proof coinage

Proof coinage refers to special early samples of a coin issue, historically made for checking the dies and for archival purposes, but nowadays often struck in greater numbers specially for coin collectors (numismatists). Nearly all countries have issued proof coinage.

Three-cent piece

The United States three cent piece was a unit of currency equaling ​3100 of a United States dollar. The mint produced two different three-cent coins for circulation: the three-cent silver and the three-cent nickel. Additionally, a three-cent bronze coin was made as a pattern in 1863. During the period from 1865 to 1873, both coins were minted, albeit in very small quantities for the silver three-cent piece.

United States Bicentennial coinage Three US coins minted in 1975–1976

The United States Bicentennial coinage is a set of circulating commemorative coins, consisting of a quarter, half dollar and dollar struck by the United States Mint in 1975 and 1976. Regardless of when struck, each coin bears the double date 1776–1976 on the normal obverses for the Washington quarter, Kennedy half dollar and Eisenhower dollar. No coins dated 1975 of any of the three denominations were minted.

Quarter (Canadian coin) Canadian coin worth 25 cents

The quarter, short for quarter dollar, is a Canadian coin worth 25 cents or one-fourth of a Canadian dollar. It is a small, circular coin of silver colour. According to the Royal Canadian Mint, the official name for the coin is the 25-cent piece, but in practice it is usually called a "quarter", much like its American counterpart. In French, it is called a caribou or trente sous. The coin is produced at the Royal Canadian Mint's facility in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

American Silver Eagle Silver bullion coin of the United States

The American Silver Eagle is the official silver bullion coin of the United States.

Kennedy half dollar 50-cent piece depicting John F Kennedy minted after his assassination in 1963

The Kennedy half dollar, first minted in 1964, is a fifty-cent coin currently issued by the United States Mint. Intended as a memorial to the assassinated 35th President of the United States John F. Kennedy, it was authorized by Congress just over a month after his death. Use of existing works by Mint sculptors Gilroy Roberts and Frank Gasparro allowed dies to be prepared quickly, and striking of the new coins began in January 1964.

West Point Mint Branch of the United States Mint

The West Point Mint Facility is a U.S. Mint production and depository facility erected in 1937 near the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York, United States. Originally it was called the West Point Bullion Depository. At one point it had the highest concentration of silver of any U.S. mint facility, and for 12 years produced circulating pennies. It has since minted mostly commemorative coins and stored gold.

Jefferson nickel US 5-cent coin minted since 1938

The Jefferson nickel has been the five-cent coin struck by the United States Mint since 1938, when it replaced the Buffalo nickel. From 1938 until 2004, the copper-nickel coin's obverse featured a profile depiction of founding father and third U.S. President Thomas Jefferson by artist Felix Schlag; the obverse design used in 2005 was also in profile, though by Joe Fitzgerald. Since 2006 Jefferson's portrayal, newly designed by Jamie Franki, faces forward. The coin's reverse is still the Schlag original, although in 2004 and 2005 the piece bore commemorative designs.

Washington quarter US 25-cent coin minted since 1932

The Washington quarter is the present quarter dollar or 25-cent piece issued by the United States Mint. The coin was first struck in 1932; the original version was designed by sculptor John Flanagan.

One of the most highly profitable aspects of the Royal Canadian Mint’s enterprise is in its Numismatic product line. The euphoria surrounding the year 2000 led to the birth of the Millennium 25-cent coin program. The numismatic line included proof quality coins sold individually or as a complete set. This level of excess would come to signify the coming decade. The number of numismatic releases would increase on an annual basis starting in 2003. Numismatic three cents, five cents, and ten cents would be introduced, along with numismatic three dollars and eight dollars. Luxury coins would not be immune to the dramatic increases that ensued. Coins with face values of 250, 300 and 350 dollars would be introduced by 2006.

Coin roll hunting

Coin roll hunting is the hobby of searching and sorting coinage pulled from circulation for collectible coins. This is achieved through obtaining rolled coin, boxed coin, or bagged coin from banks and credit unions. A variant of this practice involves banknotes and is carried out in essentially the same fashion, normally to search for unusual serial numbers, star notes and misprints.

United States dollar Currency of the United States of America

The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the Coinage Act of 1792. One dollar is divided into 100 cents, or into 1000 mills for accounting and taxation purposes. The Coinage Act of 1792 created a decimal currency by creating the dime, nickel, and penny coins, as well as the dollar, half dollar, and quarter dollar coins, all of which are still minted in 2020.

America the Beautiful quarters Series of U.S. coins

The America the Beautiful quarters are a series of 56 25-cent pieces (quarters) issued by the United States Mint starting in 2010 and scheduled to continue until 2021. The obverse (front) of all the coins depicts George Washington in a modified version of the portrait used for the original 1932 Washington quarter. There will be five new reverse (back) designs each year, each commemorating a national park or national site – one from each state, the federal district, and each territory. The program is authorized by the America’s Beautiful National Parks Quarter Dollar Coin Act of 2008.

America the Beautiful silver bullion coins Silver bullion coins of the United States

The America the Beautiful silver bullion coins comprise a series of silver bullion coins with a face value of a quarter dollar. The coins contain five troy ounces of silver, making them the largest silver bullion coins ever issued by the United States Mint. The design of the coins duplicates exactly—though enlarged—each of the America the Beautiful quarters. They have been issued since 2010 and will continue to be issued until at least 2021. The coins are available for sale during the year in which their corresponding circulating coin is issued. The coins are distributed by the United States Mint's network of authorized bullion dealers, and may be resold at the discretion of the Director of the National Park Service.

United States Proof Set

The United States Mint Proof Set, commonly known as the Proof Set in the United States, is a set of proof coins sold by the United States Mint. The proof set is popular with coin collectors as it is an affordable way to collect examples of United States coinage in proof condition.

The United States Uncirculated Coin Set, known as the Uncirculated Set or Mint Set in the United States, is an annual coin set sold by the United States Mint. The set is marketed towards coin collectors as a way to obtain circulation coins in mint condition.

References

  1. McMorrow-Hernandez, Joshua. "The Coin Analyst: What Are Your 50 State Quarters Worth Now?". coinweek.com. CoinWeek, LLC. Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  2. McMorrow-Hernandez, Joshua. "The Coin Analyst: What Are Your 50 State Quarters Worth Now?". coinweek.com. CoinWeek, LLC. Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  3. Gilkes, Paul. "2020-S America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof set sales launch Feb. 20". coinworld.com. Amos Media Company. Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  4. Gilkes, Pual. "2020-S America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof set sales launch Feb. 20". coinworld.com. Amos Media Company. Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  5. "United States Mint 2009 District of Columbia & U.S. Territories Quarters Proof Set Now Available". usmint.gov. United States Mint. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  6. Potter, Ken. "Do you have a $10,000 edge error?". numismaticnews.net. Active Interest Media. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  7. Gilkes, Paul. "Commemoratives in Prestige Proof sets". coinworld.com. Amos Media Company. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  8. 2011 United States Mint Proof Set Certificate of Authenticity. The United States Mint. 2011.
  9. Martin, Erik. "Info for 1975 U.S. coin sets?". coinworld.com. Amos Media Company. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  10. Morgan, Charles; Walker, Hubert. "Modern US Coins: Collecting the Ultimate 1981 Mint Set". coinweek.com. CoinWeek, LLC. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  11. McMorrow-Hernandez, Joshua. "Collecting US Coins – Modern Rarities: 1982 & 1983 Souvenir Coin Sets". coinweek.com. CoinWeek, LLC. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  12. "1999 Proof Sets Go On Sale". pcgs.com. Collectors Universe, Inc. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  13. "Proof Sets, 2000-S Proof Set, 10 Piece PR". pcgs.com. Collectors Universe, Inc. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  14. "2009 Lincoln Proof Cent Products". coinnews.net. CoinNews Media Group LLC. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  15. "2009 United States Mint Silver Proof Set™ Available July 17". usmint.gov. United States Mint. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  16. 1992 United States Mint Silver Proof Set Certificate of Authenticity. The United States Mint. 1992.
  17. 1999 United States Mint Silver Proof Set Certificate of Authenticity. The United States Mint. 1999.
  18. "Souvenir Sets". My Coin Guides. Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  19. "United States 1970-D Kennedy Half Dollar". coinweek.com. CoinWeek, LLC. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  20. "United States 1973 (P) Eisenhower Dollar". coinweek.com. CoinWeek, LLC. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  21. Zielinski, Michael. "1996-W Roosevelt Dime Celebrated 50th Anniversary". coinupdate.com. Coin Update. Retrieved 4 February 2020.
  22. "Click here to view larger image Image not actual size 2011 United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set®". U.S. Mint Online Product Catalog. U.S. Department of the Treasury. Retrieved 16 October 2011.
  23. Unser, Mike. "US Mint Sales: 2017-S Enhanced Uncirculated Set Returns". coinnews.net. CoinNews Media Group LLC. Retrieved 11 March 2020.