Verdi Inlet

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Verdi Inlet ( 71°36′S74°30′W / 71.600°S 74.500°W / -71.600; -74.500 Coordinates: 71°36′S74°30′W / 71.600°S 74.500°W / -71.600; -74.500 ) is an ice-filled inlet lying between Pesce Peninsula and Harris Peninsula, on the north side of the Beethoven Peninsula, situated in the southwest portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The inlet was observed from the air and first roughly mapped by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947-48. Remapped from the RARE air photos by Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960. Named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901), Italian opera composer.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Pesce Peninsula is a broad snow-covered peninsula lying between Rameau Inlet and Verdi Inlet on the north side of the Beethoven Peninsula, situated in the southwest portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. Dykeman Point is the main and only headland on Pesce Peninsula marking the northern extremity of the peninsula. Photographed from the air by Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48, and mapped from these photographs by D. Searle of Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), 1960. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Commander Victor L. Pesce, U.S. Navy, Commanding Officer, U.S. Navy Antarctic Development Squadron Six (VXE-6), from May 1980 to May 1981. Pesce Peninsula is one of the eight peninsulas of Alexander Island.

Beethoven Peninsula

The Beethoven Peninsula is a deeply indented, ice-covered peninsula, 60 miles (100 km) long in a northeast-southwest direction and 60 miles (100 km) wide at its broadest part, forming the southwest part of Alexander Island, which lies off the southwestern portion of the Antarctic Peninsula. The south side of the peninsula is supported by the Bach Ice Shelf whilst the north side of the peninsula is supported by the Wilkins Ice Shelf. The Mendelssohn Inlet, the Brahms Inlet and the Verdi Inlet apparently intrude into it. The Bach Ice Shelf, Rossini Point and Berlioz Point are some distance away, on the Ronne Entrance from the Southern Ocean. Beethoven Peninsula is one of the eight peninsulas of Alexander Island.

See also

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Verdi Inlet" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Alexander Island island in the Bellingshausen Sea off Antarctica

Alexander Island, which is also known as Alexander I Island, Alexander I Land, Alexander Land, Alexander I Archipelago, and Zemlja Alexandra I, is the largest island of Antarctica. It lies in the Bellingshausen Sea west of Palmer Land, Antarctic Peninsula from which it is separated by Marguerite Bay and George VI Sound. George VI Ice Shelf entirely fills George VI Sound and connects Alexander Island to Palmer Land. The island partly surrounds Wilkins Sound, which lies to its west. Alexander Island is about 390 kilometres (240 mi) long in a north-south direction, 80 kilometres (50 mi) wide in the north, and 240 kilometres (150 mi) wide in the south. Alexander Island is the second largest uninhabited island in the world, after Devon Island.

Bennett Dome is a rounded snow-covered peninsula on the south side of Beethoven Peninsula, Alexander Island, Antarctica. rising to about 460 metres (1,500 ft) between Weber Inlet and Boccherini Inlet. It was photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947 and roughly mapped from the photographs by D. Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960. It was mapped definitively by the United States Geological Survey from U.S. Navy aerial photographs taken 1967–68 and from Landsat imagery taken 1972–73, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Joseph E. Bennett, the head of the Polar Coordination and Information Section, Division of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation, 1976–86. Bennett Dome is one of the eight peninsulas of Alexander Island.

Boccherini Inlet is an ice-filled inlet, 18 nautical miles (33 km) long and 16 nautical miles (30 km) wide, lying between Bennett Dome and Shostakovich Peninsula, which indents the south side of Beethoven Peninsula and forms the northern extremity of the Bach Ice Shelf in Alexander Island. It was first mapped from air photos taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48, by D. Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Luigi Boccherini, the Italian composer.

Bowman Inlet is an ice-filled inlet between Kay Nunatak and Platt Point on the Hollick-Kenyon Peninsula, on the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. The inlet was photographed from the air by Lincoln Ellsworth, November 23, 1935, and its western shore was mapped from the photographs by W.L.G. Joerg. It was rephotographed by the United States Antarctic Service, 1940, the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947, and was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, 1958. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Lieutenant Bradley J. Bowman, U.S. Navy Reserve, officer in charge, Palmer Station Construction Unit, Operation Deep Freeze, 1969.

Britten Inlet is an ice-filled inlet and the only inlet on Monteverdi Peninsula indenting the southwest side of the Peninsula, south Alexander Island, Antarctica. The inlet was delineated from U.S. Landsat imagery of January 1973. In association with the names of composers grouped in this area, it was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee, 1977, after Benjamin Britten, the British composer.

Condor Peninsula is a mountainous, ice-covered peninsula, 56 kilometres (30 nmi) long and 19 to 28 kilometres wide, between Odom Inlet and Hilton Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land. The peninsula was first observed and photographed from the air in the course of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) "Condor" flight of December 30, 1940 from the East Base with Black, Snow, Perce, Carroll and Dyer aboard. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after the twin-motored Curtiss-Wright Condor biplane in which personnel of USAS, 1939–41, made numerous photographic flights and flights of discovery over the Antarctic Peninsula, George VI Sound, Alexander Island, Charcot Island and the Bellingshausen Sea between latitudes 67°30′S and 74°0′S. The peninsula was mapped in detail by the United States Geological Survey in 1974.

Stravinsky Inlet is an ice-covered inlet lying between Shostakovich Peninsula and Monteverdi Peninsula in southern Alexander Island, Antarctica. The inlet was first mapped by Directorate of Overseas Surveys from satellite imagery supplied by U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration in cooperation with U.S. Geological Survey. Named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971), Russian-born composer who became a French citizen, ultimately a citizen of the United States.

Muus Glacier is a glacier entering the north side of Odom Inlet between Snyder Peninsula and Strømme Ridge, on the east coast of Palmer Land. Mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1974. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for David Muus, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) oceanographer aboard USCGC Northwind in the Ross Sea area, 1971–72, and a participant in the Weddell Sea Oceanographic Investigations aboard USCGC Glacier, 1974-75.

Derocher Peninsula is a snow-covered peninsula between Brahms Inlet and Mendelssohn Inlet on the north side of Beethoven Peninsula, Alexander Island, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48, and mapped from these photographs by D. Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), 1960. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Commander Paul J. Derocher, U.S. Navy, Commanding Officer, Antarctic Development Squadron Six (VXE-6), May 1985 to May 1986. Derocher Peninsula is one of the eight peninsulas of Alexander Island.

Pelter Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Pelter Glacier is a glacier about 5 nautical miles long on Thurston Island, flowing from the east side of Noville Peninsula into the west side of Murphy Inlet. Delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 in January 1960. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for J.A. Pelter, aerial photographer with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition in 1933-35.

Dykeman Point is a snow-covered point between Rameau Inlet and Verdi Inlet, marking the northwestern extremity of Pesce Peninsula on the Beethoven Peninsula, southwest Alexander Island, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from U.S. Navy aerial photographs taken 1967–68 and from Landsat imagery taken 1972–73. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Commander Paul R. Dykeman, U.S. Navy, Commanding Officer of Antarctic Development Squadron Six (VXE-6) from May 1981 to May 1982.

Eroica Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula lying north of Beethoven Peninsula and Mendelssohn Inlet in western Alexander Island, Antarctica. The tip of the peninsula is Kosar Point, marking the western extremity of the Eroica Peninsula. It was mapped from trimetrogon air photography taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48, and from survey by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, 1948–50. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Beethoven's Eroica symphony, in association with Beethoven Peninsula. Eroica Peninsula is one of the eight peninsulas of Alexander Island.

Monteverdi Peninsula is a large ice-covered peninsula lying between the Bach Ice Shelf and George VI Sound, forming the southernmost extremity of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The southern side of the feature was first seen and charted by Finn Ronne and Carl Eklund of the United States Antarctic Service, 1939–41, who traversed the entire length of George VI Sound. The peninsula was mapped from trimetrogon air photography taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947–48, and from survey by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, 1948-50. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Italian composer Claudio Monteverdi.

Mendelssohn Inlet is an ice-filled inlet, 25 nautical miles (46 km) long and 9 nautical miles (17 km) wide, situated between Derocher Peninsula and Eroica Peninsula on the north side of Beethoven Peninsula, in the southwest part of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The inlet was first sighted from the air and roughly mapped by the United States Antarctic Service, 1939–41, and was resighted and photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48. It was remapped from the RARE photos by D. Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after German composer Felix Mendelssohn.

Mazza Point is a snow-covered headland lying between Brahms Inlet and Mendelssohn Inlet, marking the northwest end of Derocher Peninsula, a minor peninsula that extends in a northwest point from Beethoven Peninsula, situated in the southwest portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The headland was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey from U.S. Navy aerial photographs taken in 1967–68 and from U.S. Landsat imagery taken in 1972–73. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Commander Joseph D. Mazza, U.S. Navy, Commanding Officer of Squadron VXE-6, May 1986 to May 1987.

Mount Schumann is a mountain rising to about 600 m (1,969 ft) southwest of the head of Brahms Inlet on the Beethoven Peninsula and lies 2 mi (3 km) northeast of Chopin Hill in the southwest portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The mountain was first mapped from air photos taken by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947–48, by Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960. This feature was named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Robert Schumann (1810–56), a German composer.

Radigan Point is a snow-covered headland lying between Verdi Inlet and Brahms Inlet, marking the north extremity of the Harris Peninsula, a minor peninsula protrudes northward from the Beethoven Peninsula, situated in the southwest portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The headland was first photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition from 1947 to 1948, and mapped from these photographs by D. Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, 1960. This feature was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Commander Matthew J. Radigan, U.S. Navy. Commanding Officer, U.S. Navy Squadron VXE-6, from May 1983 to May 1984.

Memorials to Giuseppe Verdi

The following is a compilation of memorials to the composer Giuseppe Verdi in the form of physical monuments and institutions and other entities named after him.