Waterworks (card game)

Last updated
Waterworks
Players 2–5
Setup time 5 minutes
Playing time 15 minutes
Random chance Medium

Waterworks is a card game created by Parker Brothers in 1972. The game pieces consist of a deck of 110 pipe cards, 1 bathtub-shaped card tray, and 10 small metal wrenches. The object is for each player to create a pipeline of a designated length, beginning with a valve and ending with a spout. Players race to be the first to complete a continuous, leak-free pipeline that connects their valve card to their spout card. [1]

Card game game using playing cards as the primary device

A card game is any game using playing cards as the primary device with which the game is played, be they traditional or game-specific. Countless card games exist, including families of related games. A small number of card games played with traditional decks have formally standardized rules, but most are folk games whose rules vary by region, culture, and person. Games using playing cards exploit the fact that cards are individually identifiable from one side only, so that each player knows only the cards he holds and not those held by anyone else. For this reason card games are often characterized as games of chance or “imperfect information”—as distinct from games of strategy or “perfect information,” where the current position is fully visible to all players throughout the game.

Parker Brothers American toy and game manufacturer

Parker Brothers was an American toy and game manufacturer which later became a brand of Hasbro. More than 1,800 games were published under the Parker Brothers name since 1883. Among its products were Monopoly, Cluedo, Sorry!, Risk, Trivial Pursuit, Ouija, Aggravation, Bop It, and Probe. The trade name became defunct with former products being marketed under the "Hasbro Gaming" label. However, in 2017, Hasbro revived the brand with the release of several new games which bear similarities with those of some of its previous better well known products.

Wrench tool used to provide grip and mechanical advantage

A wrench or spanner is a tool used to provide grip and mechanical advantage in applying torque to turn objects—usually rotary fasteners, such as nuts and bolts—or keep them from turning.

Contents

Gameplay

Players begin with a hand of five pipe cards and two wrenches. Cards used in play are lead pipe cards, copper pipe cards (invulnerable to leaks), and lead pipe cards that are already leaky. The valve card is placed on the table to begin a player's pipeline. The spout card is set aside until it is used by a player who has completed their pipeline, and then immediately the player ends the game by placing the spout aimed down toward the player.

Lead Chemical element with atomic number 82

Lead is a chemical element with symbol Pb and atomic number 82. It is a heavy metal that is denser than most common materials. Lead is soft and malleable, and also has a relatively low melting point. When freshly cut, lead is silvery with a hint of blue; it tarnishes to a dull gray color when exposed to air. Lead has the highest atomic number of any stable element and three of its isotopes are endpoints of major nuclear decay chains of heavier elements.

Copper Chemical element with atomic number 29

Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement.

A number of different pipe shapes (L-bends, T-pipes, straight, etc.) are represented in the game. Leaky pipes can only be added to the end or over the last piece of another player's pipeline, and players cannot add to their pipeline until leaks are repaired. Leaks are repaired by either placing an intact pipe of the same shape over the leak or placing a wrench on the leak card. Repaired pipes cannot leak again. Play proceeds clockwise and new cards are drawn after cards are played. Players always have the option of exchanging a single card rather than playing a card. [1]

Cards required to win

The minimum length of the pipeline required to win varies by the number of players, as follows:

Players Cards
2 15
3 12
4 10
5 8
6 6

Other rules

Reissued edition

Winning Moves Games has reissued the game as Classic Waterworks. [2]

Winning Moves Games is a maker of classic card games and board games, puzzles, action games and adult party games. The company is known for game reproduction, republishing and variants like Monopoly: The Mega Edition.

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References

  1. 1 2 Wilding, Richard (March 4, 2006). "Official Water Works Game Rules". Richard's Monopoly Site. Retrieved 2010-12-28.
  2. "Classic Waterworks". Winning Moves . Retrieved 2010-12-28.