Waterzooi

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Waterzooi

(waterzooi) (79743868).jpg

Fish Waterzooi garnished with vegetables
Type Stew
Place of originFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
Region or state Flanders
Main ingredients Fish or chicken, vegetable broth, egg yolks, cream
Wikibooks-logo-en-noslogan.svg Cookbook: Waterzooi   Commons-logo.svg Media: Waterzooi

Waterzooi is a stew dish from Belgium and originating in Flanders . The second part of the name derives from the Middle Dutch terms "sode", "zo(o)de" and "soot", words referring to the act of boiling or the ingredients being boiled. [1] It is sometimes called Gentse Waterzooi which refers to the Belgian town of Ghent where it originated. The original dish is often made of fish, either freshwater or sea, (known as Viszooitje), though today chicken waterzooi (Kippenwaterzooi) is more common. The most accepted theory is that rivers around Ghent became too polluted and the fish there disappeared. [2] Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor ate the rich dish, even after suffering from gout. [3]

Stew combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy

A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Ingredients in a stew can include any combination of vegetables and may include meat, especially tougher meats suitable for slow-cooking, such as beef. Poultry, sausages, and seafood are also used. While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, stock is also common. Seasoning and flavourings may also be added. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature, allowing flavours to mingle.

Belgian cuisine

Belgian cuisine is widely varied with significant regional variations while also reflecting the cuisines of neighbouring France, Germany and the Netherlands. It is sometimes said that Belgian food is served in the quantity of German cuisine but with the quality of French food. Outside the country, Belgium is best known for its chocolate, waffles, fries and beer.

Flanders Community and region of Belgium

Flanders is the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium and one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium. However, there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history, and sometimes involving neighbouring countries. The demonym associated with Flanders is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish. The official capital of Flanders is Brussels, although the Brussels Capital Region has an independent regional government, and the government of Flanders only oversees the community aspects of Flanders life in Brussels such as (Flemish) culture and education.

Contents

Varieties

All versions are based on a soup-base of egg yolk, cream and thickened vegetable broth. The stew itself contains fish or chicken, vegetables including carrots, onions, celeriac, leeks, potatoes and herbs such as parsley, thyme, bay-leaves and sage. [4]

Cream dairy product

Cream is a dairy product composed of the higher-butterfat layer skimmed from the top of milk before homogenization. In un-homogenized milk, the fat, which is less dense, eventually rises to the top. In the industrial production of cream, this process is accelerated by using centrifuges called "separators". In many countries, it is sold in several grades depending on the total butterfat content. It can be dried to a powder for shipment to distant markets, and contains high levels of saturated fat.

Broth liquid food preparation

Broth is a savory liquid made of water in which bones, meat, fish, or vegetables have been simmered. It can be eaten alone, but it is most commonly used to prepare other dishes, such as soups, gravies, and sauces.

Carrot Root vegetable, usually orange in color

The carrot is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist. Carrots are a domesticated form of the wild carrot, Daucus carota, native to Europe and southwestern Asia. The plant probably originated in Persia and was originally cultivated for its leaves and seeds. The most commonly eaten part of the plant is the taproot, although the stems and leaves are eaten as well. The domestic carrot has been selectively bred for its greatly enlarged, more palatable, less woody-textured taproot.

Fish

Originally, burbot was used but this fish had all but disappeared from the rivers until its recent return due to conservation efforts. [5] Nowadays, fish such as eel, pike, carp and bass are used, though other fish such as cod, monkfish, or halibut can be used. Gentse Waterzooi van Tarbot includes turbot.

Burbot species of fish

The burbot is the only gadiform (cod-like) freshwater fish. It is also known as bubbot, mariah, freshwater ling, the lawyer, coney-fish, lingcod, freshwater cusk, and eelpout. The species is closely related to the marine common ling and the cusk. It is the only member of the genus Lota. For some time of the year, the burbot lives under ice, and they require frigid temperatures to breed.

Eel order of fishes

An eel is any ray-finned fish belonging to the order Anguilliformes, which consists of four suborders, 20 families, 111 genera, and about 800 species. Eels undergo considerable development from the early larval stage to the eventual adult stage, and most are predators. The term “eel” originally referred to the European eel, and the name of the order means “European eel-shaped.”

<i>Esox</i> genus of fishes

Esox is a genus of freshwater fish, the only living genus in the family Esocidae—the esocids which were endemic to North America and Eurasia during the Paleogene through present.

Meat

Chicken is a popular alternative to fish in the recipe, though the rest of the ingredients remain the same.

See also

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References

  1. van Dale Etymologisch Woordenboek, p.965, dr. P.A.F. van Veen & drs. Nicoline van der Sijs, 1989, ISBN   90-6648-312-1
  2. "Gentse Waterzooi » Gentblogt". gentblogt.be.
  3. Patricia Carson, Fair Face of Flanders (Belgian Art Research Institute, 2001), p. 124.
  4. "Le Waterzooi Gantois (cuisine de Gand)". La Bonne Cuisine. Retrieved 11 March 2013.
  5. "Na meer dan 40 jaar opnieuw kwabaal in Grote Nete". Het Laatste Nieuws . 29 June 2010. Retrieved 11 March 2013.