William Morgan (of Dderw)

Last updated

William Morgan
Born1582
Died1649
Nationality Welsh
ChildrenBlanche Morgan (daughter)
Miles Morgan

William Morgan (died 1649) was a Welsh lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1628 to 1649.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Morgan was the son of Llewellyn Morgan of Ystradfellte. He was called to the bar. He purchased the estate of Dderw in Llyswen. He was Recorder of Brecon from 1637, and was King's attorney in South Wales until his death. [1]

Ystradfellte village in southern Powys, Wales

Ystradfellte is a small village and community in southern Powys, Wales. It belongs to the historic county of Brecknockshire (Breconshire) and the Fforest Fawr area of the Brecon Beacons National Park. It lies beside the Afon Mellte. The village is linked by minor roads with Heol Senni to the north and the A4059 north of Penderyn, and with Pontneddfechan at the head of the Vale of Neath to the south.

The call to the bar is a legal term of art in most common law jurisdictions where persons must be qualified to be allowed to argue in court on behalf of another party and are then said to have been "called to the bar" or to have received a "call to the bar". "The bar" is now used as a collective noun for barristers, but literally referred to the wooden barrier in old courtrooms, which separated the often crowded public area at the rear from the space near the judges reserved for those having business with the Court. Barristers would sit or stand immediately behind it, facing the judge, and could use it as a table for their briefs.

Llyswen hamlet in the county of Powys, Wales

Llyswen is a small village in Powys, Wales on the west bank of the River Wye. It was formerly within the county of Brecknockshire and now forms part of the Community of Bronllys. The nearest town is Brecon approximately 8 miles (13 km) to the south-west.

In 1628, Morgan was elected Member of Parliament for Monmouth Boroughs. He was later elected in April 1640 for Breconshire in the Short Parliament, re-elected for Breconshire for the Long Parliament in November 1640 and sat until his death in 1649. [2] In February 1649 information was laid against him that he had supported the Royalist cause in the Civil War, raising money and arms for the king and sitting in the King's parliament in Oxford. [1]

Monmouth Boroughs was a parliamentary constituency consisting of several towns in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliaments of England, Great Britain, and finally the United Kingdom; until 1832 the constituency was known simply as Monmouth, though it included other "contributory boroughs".

Breconshire or Brecknockshire was a constituency in Wales which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the English Parliament, and later to the Parliament of Great Britain and of the United Kingdom, between 1542 and 1918.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Morgan died in 1649 and was buried in the Priory Church, Brecon. [1]

Morgan married Elizabeth Morgan, daughter of Sir William Morgan of Tredegar. His son William was High Sheriff in 1655. He was the father-in-law of William Morgan (of Machen and Tredegar). [1]

Sir William Morgan was a Welsh landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons of England between 1659 and 1680.

Family

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 W R Williams The Parliamentary History of the Principality of Wales
  2. MORGAN, William (c.1600-1649), of Y Dderw, Llyswen, Brec. and the Middle Temple, London. Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1604-1629, ed. Andrew Thrush and John P. Ferris, 2010
Parliament of England
Preceded by
William Fortune
Member of Parliament for Monmouth Boroughs
1628–1629
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Breconshire
1640–1649
Succeeded by
Philip Jones