1964 Tibetan Parliament in Exile election

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On February 20, 1964 the second parliamentary election for the Tibetan Parliament in Exile was held. It was the second time Tibetans in exile were able to choose their representatives. [1] Three seats were separated specifically for women as an especial request from the Dalai Lama and the number of representatives was increased from 14 to 17. The four classic schools of Tibetan Buddhism were represented as the three historical regions of Tibet; U-Tsang, Kham and Ando. [2]

Composition

Seat [3] Member [3] Representation [3]
1 PresidentJheshong Tsewang Tamdin Sakya
2 Vice PresidentSamkhar Tsering Wangdu Ü-Tsang
3Ratoe Chuwar TrulkuDalai Lama Appointed
4Pelyul Zongna Trulku Jampel Lodoe Nyingma
5Loling Tsachag Lobsang Kyenrab Gelug
6Lodoe Choedhen Kagyu
7Ngawang Choesang Ü-Tsang
8Phartsang Chukhor Kalsang Damdul
9Tengring Rinchen Dolma
10Jagoetsang Namgyal Dorje Kham (Dhotoe)
11Yabtsang Dechen Dolma
12Sadutsang Lobsang Nyandak
13Jangtsatsang Tsering GonpoAppointed Minister, replaced by Drawu Pon Rinchen Tsering
14Kirti Jamyang Sonam Amdo (Dhomey)
15Tongkhor Trulku Lobsang Jangchub
16Taklha Tsering Dolma
17Kongtsa Jampa Choedak

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References

  1. (in French) Julien Cleyet-Marel, Le développement du système politique tibétain en exil, préface Richard Ghevontian, Fondation Varenne, 2013, ISBN   2916606726, ISBN   9782916606729, p. 261
  2. Robert McCorquodale, Nicholas Orosz, Tibet, the position in international law: report of the Conference of International Lawyers on Issues Relating to Self-Determination and Independence for Tibet, London 6-10 January 1993, Serindia Publications, Inc., 1994, ISBN   0906026342, ISBN   9780906026342, p. 195
  3. 1 2 3 ""The Tibetan National Emblem" - International Network of Parliamentarians" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-03. Retrieved 2016-03-22.