1960 Tibetan Parliament in Exile election

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The first election for the then named Tibetan Assembly was held on September 2, 1960, as part of a process of democratization of the Tibetan community encourage by the Dalai Lama. [1] The election for Parliament was announced by the Dalai Lama in a trip to Bodh Gaya on January of the same year. This was the first time in history that Tibetans could elect their political leaders and September 2 is currently celebrate among the Tibetan diaspora as “Democracy Day”. One of the first decisions of the Assembly was to abolish all hereditary titles and functions of the old aristocracy, Buddhist hierarchy and tribal leaders declaring the equality of all Tibetans. Since that, other 15 assemblies have been elected. [2]

Composition

Seat [3] Member [3] Representation [3]
1Karma Thubten Nyingma
2Jheshong Tsewang Tamdin Sakya
3Atro Rinpoché Karma Shenphen Choekyi Dawa Kagyu
4Chiso Lobsang Namgyal Gelug
5Samkhar Tsering Wangdu Ü-Tsang
6Tamshul Dhedong Wangdi Dorje (Wangdue Dorjee  [ fr ])
7Phartsang Chukhor Kalsang Damdul
8Drawu Rinchen Tsering Kham (Dhotoe)
9Jangtsetsang Tsering Gonpo
10Sadutsang Lobsang Nyandak
11Alag Trigen JamyangResigned, replaced by Tongkhor Trulku Lobsang Jangchub, Amdo (Dhomey)
12Gungthang Tsultrim
13Gyalrong Trichu Dorje Pelsang

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References

  1. Friedrich Naumann Foundation, Tibetans in-exile elect a new Parliament.
  2. (in French)Julien Cleyet-Marel, Le développement du système politique tibétain en exil, préface Richard Ghevontian, Fondation Varenne, 2013, ISBN   2916606726, ISBN   9782916606729, p. 261
  3. 1 2 3 ""The Tibetan National Emblem" - International Network of Parliamentarians" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-03. Retrieved 2016-03-22.