1979 in heavy metal music

Last updated
List of years in heavy metal music (table)

This is a timeline documenting the events of heavy metal in the year 1979.

Contents

Newly formed bands

220 Volt is a Swedish heavy metal band, formed in 1979 by guitar players Thomas Drevin and Mats Karlsson. The band released albums on the CBS Records and Epic Records labels.

A II Z were a heavy metal band founded in 1979 in Manchester, England by guitarist Gary Owens. The original lineup consisted of David Owens (vocals), Gary Owens (guitar), Cam Campbell (bass), Karl Reti (drums). For a short time they were one of the forerunners of the new wave of British heavy metal movement. They disbanded in 1982.

Atomkraft are an English heavy metal band who were part of the new wave of British heavy metal movement. They formed in 1979 and disbanded 1988. Their "Total Metal" approach is somewhere between fellow NWOBHM bands such as Motörhead and Venom, punk rock bands such as The Dickies, and early Exodus or Slayer. The band subsequently reformed in 2005.

Albums & EPs

January

DayAlbumArtistNotes
15 Lovedrive Scorpions
16 Accept Accept
N/A The Def Leppard E.P. Def Leppard EP
No Mean City Nazareth
Strangers in the Night UFO Live

February

DayAlbumArtistNotes
28 Hell Bent For Leather Judas Priest USA Release

March

DayAlbumArtistNotes
23 Van Halen II Van Halen
24 Overkill Motörhead
30 Just a Game Triumph

April

DayAlbumArtistNotes
13 Black Rose: A Rock Legend Thin Lizzy
N/A Strikes Blackfoot

May

DayAlbumArtistNotes
21 Saxon Saxon
23 Dynasty Kiss
N/A Narita Riot Japan
State of Shock Ted Nugent

June

DayAlbumArtistNotes
19 Mirrors Blue Öyster Cult
22 Live Killers Queen Live
N/A Survivors Samson

July

DayAlbumArtistNotes
27 Highway to Hell AC/DC
28 Down to Earth Rainbow
N/A Gamma 1 Gamma

August

DayAlbumArtistNotes
15 In Through the Out Door Led Zeppelin

September

DayAlbumArtistNotes
11 Head Games Foreigner
17 Unleashed in the East Judas Priest Live
N/A Street Machine Sammy Hagar

October

DayAlbumArtistNotes
27 Bomber Motörhead
N/A Flirtin' with Disaster Molly Hatchet
Harder ... Faster April Wine
Lovehunter Whitesnake
Magnum II Magnum
Mr. Universe Gillan

November

DayAlbumArtistNotes
1 Night in the Ruts Aerosmith
9 The Soundhouse Tapes Iron Maiden EP

Events

Ozzy Osbourne English heavy metal vocalist and songwriter

John Michael "Ozzy" Osbourne, also known as The Prince of Darkness, is an English vocalist, songwriter, actor and reality television star who rose to prominence during the 1970s as the lead vocalist of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. He was fired from the band in 1979 due to alcohol and drug problems, but went on to have a successful solo career, releasing eleven studio albums, the first seven of which were all awarded multi-platinum certifications in the United States. Osbourne has since reunited with Black Sabbath on several occasions. He rejoined the band in 1997 and recorded the group’s final studio album 13 (2013) before they embarked on a farewell tour which culminated in a final performance in their home city Birmingham, England in February 2017. His longevity and success have earned him the informal title of "Godfather of Heavy Metal".

Black Sabbath British heavy metal band

Black Sabbath were an English rock band, formed in Birmingham in 1968, by guitarist and main songwriter Tony Iommi, bassist and main lyricist Geezer Butler, drummer Bill Ward, and singer Ozzy Osbourne. Black Sabbath are often cited as pioneers of heavy metal music. The band helped define the genre with releases such as Black Sabbath (1970), Paranoid (1970), and Master of Reality (1971). The band had multiple line-up changes, with Iommi being the only constant member throughout its history.

Ronnie James Dio American singer-songwriter and composer

Ronald James Padavona known professionally as Ronnie James Dio or simply Dio, was an American heavy metal singer-songwriter and composer. He fronted or founded numerous groups throughout his career, including Elf, Rainbow, Black Sabbath, Dio, and Heaven & Hell.

Preceded by
1978
Heavy Metal Timeline
1979
Succeeded by
1980

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