2006 Four Nations Tournament (women's football)

Last updated
2006 Four Nations Tournament
Tournament details
Host country China
City Guangzhou
Dates 18-22 January, 2006
Teams 4 (from 3 confederations)
Venue(s) Guangdong Olympic Stadium
2005
2007

The 2006 Four Nations Tournament was the sixth edition of the Four Nations Tournament, an invitational women's football tournament held in China. [1] The venue for this edition of the tournament was Guangdong Olympic Stadium, in the city of Guangzhou.

The Four Nations Tournament is an invitational women's football tournament taking place in various cities of China since 1998. Since 2002, it has been held every year except for 2010. United States, Norway, China, North Korea, and Canada are the only winners of various editions of this tournament. The United States has been the most successful, winning seven editions of the tournament; with China winning six editions and Norway winning two editions.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, also commonly known as women's football or women's soccer is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

China State in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Contents

Final standings

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 321051+47
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 31114404
Flag of France.svg  France 30302203
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 30123741

Match results

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 1 3 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Trine Rønning Soccerball shade.svg 81' (penalty) [2] Kristine Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 72'
Shannon Boxx Soccerball shade.svg 77'
Abby Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 85'
Attendance: 2,000
Referee: Zhang Dong Qing (China)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1 1 Flag of France.svg  France
Han Duan Soccerball shade.svg 90' Elise Bussaglia Soccerball shade.svg 72'

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 0 0 Flag of France.svg  France
[3]
Attendance: 2,500
Referee: Deng Jun Xia (China)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 3 1 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Han Duan Soccerball shade.svg 45'
Bi Yan Soccerball shade.svg 63'
Ma Xiaoxu Soccerball shade.svg 63'
Marie Knutsen Soccerball shade.svg 60'

France  Flag of France.svg 1 1 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Laëtitia Tonazzi Soccerball shade.svg 19' Maritha Kaufmann Soccerball shade.svg 88'
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 0 2 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
[4] Kristine Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 24 penalty, 41'
Attendance: 15,000
Referee: Ann Helen Ostervold (Norway)

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