A Place of Execution

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A Place of Execution
A Place of Execution - bookcover.jpg
First edition
Author Val McDermid
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Genre Thriller
Publisher HarperCollins
Publication date
1999
Media typePrint (Hardback)
Pages408 pp
ISBN 0-670-88909-1
OCLC 41432064

A Place of Execution is a crime novel by Val McDermid, first published in 1999. The novel won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the 2001 Dilys Award, was shortlisted for both the Gold Dagger and the Edgar Award, and was chosen by The New York Times as one of the most notable books of the year.

Contents

Plot

The novel has two parallel storylines; the first, set in 1963, follows Detective Inspector George Bennett, who attempts to locate a missing girl in Derbyshire. [1] The second, set in the present day, follows journalist Catherine Heathcote, whose plans to publish a story of the investigation are derailed when Bennett inexplicably stops cooperating and she attempts to find out why.

Television adaption

The novel was adapted for TV by Patrick Harbinson and was made into a 3-part TV drama shown on ITV 1 (1st episode screened 22 Sept 08). It was produced in the UK by Coastal Productions in collaboration with ITV ITV from 22 September to 6 October 2008. The series was nominated for The UK TV Dagger at the 2009 Crime Thriller Awards, and star Juliet Stevenson was awarded Best Actress on 21 October 2009. [2] It also aired as a three-part series in November 2009 in the US as part of the anthology series Masterpiece: Contemporary! . [3] The teleplay won the 2010 Edgar Allan Poe Award for best television episode teleplay from the Mystery Writers of America.

Awards

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References

  1. "Crime Author List - Leicestershire County Council". Leics.gov.uk. 2010-10-12. Retrieved 2012-01-27.
  2. Allen, Kate (7 September 2009). "Coben, Cole, Atkinson vie for crime awards". The Bookseller. Archived from the original on 10 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  3. PBS.org, retrieved August 19, 2012
  4. "The Dilys Award". Archived from the original on 2008-08-26. Retrieved 2008-08-26.
  5. "Mystery Readers International's Macavity Awards". Mysteryreaders.org. Retrieved 2012-01-27.
  6. "Anthony Awards". Fantasticfiction.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-01-27.