Anen

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Anen

Statue Aanen Turin.JPG

Statue of Anen in Turin, Museo Egizio
Successor Simut
Dynasty 18th Dynasty
Pharaoh Amenhotep III
Father Yuya
Mother Tjuyu
Burial TT120
Anen
Anen
Anen
Anen
Anen
Anen
in hieroglyphs

Anen or Aanen was an Ancient Egyptian official during the late 18th Dynasty of Egypt.

Ancient Egypt ancient civilization of Northeastern Africa

Ancient Egypt was a civilization of ancient North Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile River in the place that is now the country Egypt. Ancient Egyptian civilization followed prehistoric Egypt and coalesced around 3100 BC with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under Menes. The history of ancient Egypt occurred as a series of stable kingdoms, separated by periods of relative instability known as Intermediate Periods: the Old Kingdom of the Early Bronze Age, the Middle Kingdom of the Middle Bronze Age and the New Kingdom of the Late Bronze Age.

Biography

He was the son of Yuya and Tjuyu and the brother of Queen Tiye, the wife of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. Under the rule of his brother-in-law, Anen became the Chancellor of Lower Egypt, Second Prophet of Amun, and sem-priest of Heliopolis, and acquired the title Divine Father. [1]

Yuya Ancient Egyptian high priest of Min, father-in-law of Amenhotep III

Yuya was a powerful Egyptian courtier during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. He was married to Tjuyu, an Egyptian noblewoman associated with the royal family, who held high offices in the governmental and religious hierarchies. Their daughter, Tiye, became the Great Royal Wife of Amenhotep III.

Tjuyu Ancient Egyptian noblewoman, mother-in-law of Amenhotep III

Tjuyu was an Egyptian noblewoman and the mother of queen Tiye, and the wife of Yuya. She is the grandmother of Akhenaten, and great grandmother of Tutankhamun.

Tiye Great Royal Wife of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III

Tiye was the daughter of Yuya and Tjuyu. She became the Great Royal Wife of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III. She was the mother of Akhenaten and grandmother of Tutankhamun. Her mummy was identified as "The Elder Lady" found in the tomb of Amenhotep II (KV35) in 2010.

A surviving statue of Anen is now in the Museo Egizio, Turin (Inv. No. 5484). A shabti of his is now in The Hague. Inscriptions on Anen's own monuments do not mention that he was Amenhotep III's brother-in-law. [2] However, this relationship is established by a short but clear reference to him in his mother Tjuyu's coffin, which stated that her son Anen was the second prophet of Amun. [3]

Museo Egizio museum in Turin, Italy

The Museo Egizio is an archaeological museum in Turin, Piedmont, Italy, specialising in Egyptian archaeology and anthropology. It houses one of the largest collections of Egyptian antiquities, with more than 30,000 artefacts. In 2015 it received about 772,900 visitors.

The Hague City and municipality in South Holland, Netherlands

The Hague is a city on the western coast of the Netherlands and the capital of the province of South Holland. It is also the seat of government of the Netherlands.

It is likely that he died before Year 30 of Amenhotep III, since he is not mentioned in texts relating to the pharaoh's sed-festival [4] and in the last decade of Amenhotep's reign another man, Simut, takes over Anen's place as Second Prophet of Amun. Simut had been Fourth Prophet of Amun previously.

Simut ancient Egyptian priest, Second Prophet of Amun

Simut or Samut was an Ancient Egyptian priest who held the position of Second Prophet of Amun towards the end of the reign of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. He is known from a number of objects, including his, Theban tomb chapel Tomb A.24.

Anen was buried in his tomb (TT120) in the Theban Necropolis, on the west bank of the Nile opposite Thebes. His son and four daughters are depicted in his tomb, but their names have not survived. [1] [5]

TT120

The Theban Tomb TT120 is located in Sheikh Abd el-Qurna. It forms part of the Theban Necropolis, situated on the west bank of the Nile opposite Luxor. The tomb is the burial place of the Ancient Egyptian official, Anen who was the brother of Queen Tiye, and became Chancellor of Lower Egypt, Second Prophet of Amun, sem-priest of Heliopolis, and Divine Father under the reign of the Amenhotep III. The tomb is currently being excavated by Lyla Pinch Brock.

Theban Necropolis area in Egypt, west of the Nile near Thebes

The Theban Necropolis is a necropolis on the west bank of the Nile, opposite Thebes (Luxor) in Upper Egypt. It was used for ritual burials for much of the Pharaonic period, especially during the New Kingdom.

Nile River in Africa and the longest river in the world

The Nile is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, and is the longest river in the world, though some sources cite the Amazon River as the longest. The Nile, which is about 6,650 km (4,130 mi) long, is an "international" river as its drainage basin covers eleven countries, namely, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, South Sudan, Republic of the Sudan and Egypt. In particular, the Nile is the primary water source of Egypt and Sudan.

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TT95

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References

  1. 1 2 Aidan Dodson & Dyan Hilton, The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt, Thames & Hudson (2004) ISBN   0-500-05128-3, p. 157
  2. David O'Connor & Eric Cline, Amenhotep III: Perspectives on his reign, University of Michigan Press, 1998, p. 6
  3. O'Connor & Cline, pp. 5–6
  4. Aldred: Akhenaten, p. 220
  5. But there is to say it is not clear where Dodson / Hilton have there informations from. The last Egyptologist (Lyla Pinch-Brock) working in the tomb found no advice for these children. There is also no mention in the diaries by Norman de Garis Davies.