Ardee (Parliament of Ireland constituency)

Last updated
Ardee
Former Borough constituency
for the Irish House of Commons
Former constituency
Created1378 (1378)
Abolished1801
Replaced byDisenfranchised

Ardee (also known as Ardee Borough) was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons from 1378 to 1801.

Contents

History

Ardee in County Louth was enfranchised as a borough constituency in 1378. In 1665 the Lord Lieutenant (James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde) wrote to the Portreeve of Ardee recommending Sir Robert Byron, as Burgess in Parliament for Ardee, in the room of Captain John Chambers, "removed" and Colonel Brent Moore, in the "stead of Lieutenant John Ruxton, removed". In the Patriot Parliament of 1689 summoned by King James II, Ardee was represented by two members. [1] It continued to send two Members of Parliament to the Irish House of Commons until the Parliament of Ireland was merged into the Parliament of the United Kingdom on 1 January 1801. The constituency was disenfranchised on 31 December 1800.

The borough was represented in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom as part of the county constituency of Louth.

Electoral system and electorate

The parliamentary representatives of the borough were elected using the bloc vote for two-member elections and first past the post for single-member by-elections.

A summary of the borough electorate was included in Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837. The electorate consisted of the members of the Borough Corporation (the local Council) and the freemen. All of the classes of electors qualified because of co-option by all or part of the existing ones, so this was a constituency with an oligarchic constitution rather than a democratic one.

Members of Parliament

1689–1801

ElectionFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
1689 Patriot Parliament Hugh Gernon John Babe
1692 Henry Tichborne James Tisdall
1695 Brabazon Moore
1703 Robert Chambre
1713 Michael Tisdall
1715 William Moore
1727 Robert Parkinson John Donnellan
1741 Tichborne Aston
1748 William Ruxton
1751 John Ruxton
1761 Charles Ruxton
1768 George Lowther
1776 Francis McNamara Peter Metge
1783 John Ruxton Charles Ruxton
1785 William Ruxton
1790 William Parkinson Ruxton John Wolfe [note 1]
1798 Charles Ruxton William Ruxton
1799 William Parkinson Ruxton
1801 Disenfranchised

Notes

  1. Styled as The Honourable from 1795

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Irish House of Commons lower house of the irish parliament (until 1800)

The Irish House of Commons was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise, similar to the Unreformed House of Commons in contemporary England and Great Britain. In counties, forty-shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self-electing corporations or a highly-restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Most notably, Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691, even though they comprised the vast majority of the Irish population. From 1728 until 1793 they were also disfranchised. Most of the population of all religions had no vote. The vast majority of parliamentary boroughs were pocket boroughs, the private property of an aristocratic patron. When these boroughs were disfranchised under the Act of Union, the patron was awarded £15,000 compensation for each.

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References

  1. O'Hart (2007), p. 502
  2. 1 2 3 http://www.tara.tcd.ie/handle/2262/77206
  3. Kearney, Hugh. Strafford in Ireland 1633-1641: A Study in Absolutism. p. 225.
  4. Parliamentary Papers, Volume 62, Part 2. p. 626.
  5. Beavan, Alfred P. (1908). Chronological list of aldermen: 1651–1700. The Aldermen of the City of London: Temp. Henry III – 1912. pp. 75–119. Retrieved 2011-11-14.

Bibliography