Badger's Green (1934 film)

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Badger's Green
Directed by Adrian Brunel
Written by R.C. Sherriff (play)
R.J. Davis
Violet E. Powell
Starring Valerie Hobson
Bruce Lester
David Horne
Sebastian Smith
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount British Pictures
Release date
  • September 1934 (1934-09)
Running time
68 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Badger's Green is a 1934 British comedy film directed by Adrian Brunel and starring Valerie Hobson, Bruce Lester, David Horne and Wally Patch. It was adapted from the 1930 play Badger's Green by R.C. Sheriff. A picturesque village is threatened with redevelopment by a speculative builder, leading to widespread protest. In the end the builder agrees to settle the future of the village on the result of a cricket match. [1]

Contents

It was produced at the British & Dominions Film Corporation at Elstree Studios as a quota quickie for distribution by Paramount Pictures to allow them to comply with the terms of the annual quota. Badger's Green is currently missing from the BFI National Archive, and is listed as one of the British Film Institute's "75 Most Wanted" lost films. [2] The story was later remade for the 1949 film Badger's Green , which does survive.

Cast

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