Baron Wenlock

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Arms of Lawley: Argent, a cross formee extended to the extremes of the shield chequy or and sable LawleyArms.PNG
Arms of Lawley: Argent, a cross formée extended to the extremes of the shield chequy or and sable
Arthur Lawley,
6th and last Baron Wenlock Arthur Lawley, 6th Baron Wenlock.png
Arthur Lawley,
6th and last Baron Wenlock

Baron Wenlock is a title that has been created three times, once in the Peerage of England and twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in 1461 when the soldier Sir John Wenlock was summoned to Parliament as Lord Wenlock. However, he was childless and on his death in 1471 the title became extinct.

The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.

The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain. New peers continued to be created in the Peerage of Ireland until 1898.

John Wenlock, 1st Baron Wenlock English politician and Baron

John Wenlock, 1st Baron Wenlock KG was an English diplomat, soldier, courtier and politician. He fought on the sides of both the Yorkists and the Lancastrians in the Wars of the Roses. He has been called "the prince of turncoats", although some historians suggest the label may not be fair. Others contend that even when Wenlock was not actually changing sides, he was engaged in "fence sitting par excellence."

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The second creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1831 when Sir Robert Lawley, 6th Baronet, was created Baron Wenlock, of Wenlock in the County of Shropshire. He had earlier represented Newcastle-under-Lyme in the House of Commons. However, he was childless and on his death in 1834 the barony became extinct. He was succeeded in the baronetcy by his younger brother, the seventh Baronet. He was a former Member of Parliament for Warwickshire.

Robert Lawley, 1st Baron Wenlock was a British landowner and politician, the eldest son of Sir Robert Lawley, 5th Baronet and Jane Thompson.

Newcastle-under-Lyme (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Newcastle-under-Lyme is a constituency in north Staffordshire created in 1354 and represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2001 by Paul Farrelly of the Labour Party. The constituency was last co-represented by a member of the Conservative Party when it was a dual-member constituency before the 1885 General Election. In 1919 the local MP, industrialist and major local employer Josiah Wedgwood shifted his allegiance from the Liberal Party — the Lloyd George Coalition Liberals allying with the Conservatives — to the Labour Party and the seat has elected the Labour candidate who has stood since that date, a total of 29 elections in succession. Labour came close to losing the seat in 1969, 1986, 2015 and 2017.

Warwickshire was a parliamentary constituency in Warwickshire in England. It returned two Members of Parliament (MPs), traditionally known as knights of the shire, to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the bloc vote system.

On his death the title passed to his younger brother, the eighth Baronet. In 1820 he had inherited the Escrick estate in Yorkshire from his uncle Richard Thompson and had assumed by Royal licence the surname of Thompson in lieu of Lawley. He also represented Wenlock and the East Riding of Yorkshire. In 1839, twelve years before he succeeded in the baronetcy, the barony created for his elder brother was revived when he was made Baron Wenlock, of Wenlock in the County of Shropshire. His son, the second Baron, was Member of Parliament for Pontefract and served as Lord Lieutenant of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

Yorkshire historic county of Northern England

Yorkshire, formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom. Due to its great size in comparison to other English counties, functions have been undertaken over time by its subdivisions, which have also been subject to periodic reform. Throughout these changes, Yorkshire has continued to be recognised as a geographical territory and cultural region. The name is familiar and well understood across the United Kingdom and is in common use in the media and the military, and also features in the titles of current areas of civil administration such as North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire and East Riding of Yorkshire.

East Riding of Yorkshire was a parliamentary constituency covering the East Riding of Yorkshire, omitting Beverley residents save a small minority of Beverley residents who also qualified on property grounds to vote in the county seat. It returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament. A brief earlier guise of the seat covered the changed franchise of the First Protectorate Parliament and Second Protectorate Parliament during a fraction of the twenty years of England and Wales as a republic.

Pontefract was an English parliamentary constituency centred on the town of Pontefract in the West Riding of Yorkshire, which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons briefly in the 13th century and again from 1621 until 1885, and one member from 1885 to 1974.

His eldest son, the third Baron, notably served as Governor of Madras. His fourth brother, the sixth Baron (who succeeded his elder brother in 1931, who in his turn had succeeded his elder brother in 1918), served as Governor of Western Australia, of the Transvaal Republic and of Madras. His only son and heir Hon. Richard Edward Lawley died at an early age and on Lord Wenlock's death in 1932 both titles became extinct.

Governor of Western Australia vice-regal representative of the Australian monarch in Western Australia

The Governor of Western Australia is the representative in Western Australia of the Queen of Australia, Elizabeth II. As with the other governors of the Australian states, the Governor of Western Australia performs important constitutional, ceremonial and community functions, including:

The Lawley Baronetcy, of Spoonhill in the County of Shropshire, was created in the Baronetage of England on 16 August 1641 for Thomas Lawley, who represented Wenlock in Parliament. His son, the second Baronet, was Member of Parliament for both Wenlock and Shropshire. His eldest son, the third Baronet, also represented Wenlock in the House of Commons. The fifth Baronet was Member of Parliament for Warwickshire. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the sixth Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage as Baron Wenlock in 1831. The fourth and sixth Baronets served as High Sheriff of Staffordshire in 1743 and 1797 respectively. The seventh Baronet was High Sheriff of Warwickshire in 1839.

Sir Thomas Lawley, 1st Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1625 and 1629.

Shropshire is a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Knights of the Shire. It was divided between the constituencies of North Shropshire and South Shropshire in 1832.

This is a list of the Sheriffs and High Sheriffs of Staffordshire.

Barons Wenlock; First creation (1461)

Lawley Baronets, of Spoonhill (1641)

Sir Francis Lawley, 2nd Baronet was an English courtier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1659 and 1679.

Sir Thomas Lawley, 3rd Baronet (ca. 1650–1729) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1684 to 1689.

Sir Robert Lawley, 5th Baronet was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1780 to 1793.

Barons Wenlock; Second creation (1831)

Lawley Baronets, of Spoonhill (1641; Reverted)

Barons Wenlock; Third creation (1839)

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Wenlock may refer to:

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Beilby Richard Lawley, 2nd Baron Wenlock was an English nobleman, eldest son of Paul Thompson, 1st Baron Wenlock and 8th Baronet. He succeeded in the Barony and Baronetcy and to the family estate at Escrick, Yorkshire on the death of his father in 1852.

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References

  1. Debrett's Baronetage of England, Revised by George Collen, London, 1840, pp.340-1
  2. See: Debrett's Baronetage of England, Revised by George Collen, London, 1840, pp.340-1