Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Waterford

Last updated

Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity
WaterfordRCCathedral.JPG
Ireland adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity
Location in Ireland
52°15′41″N7°06′40″W / 52.2614°N 7.11109°W / 52.2614; -7.11109 Coordinates: 52°15′41″N7°06′40″W / 52.2614°N 7.11109°W / 52.2614; -7.11109
LocationBarronstrand Street, Waterford, Ireland
Denomination Roman Catholic
History
Status Cathedral
Consecrated 1793
Architecture
Style Classical
Completed1793
Specifications
Materials Limestone
Administration
Province Cashel and Emly
Diocese Waterford and Lismore
Parish Cathedral
Clergy
Bishop(s) Alphonsus Cullinan

The Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Waterford and Lismore located in Barronstrand Street, Waterford City, Ireland. The cathedral is the oldest post-Reformation Catholic cathedral in Ireland, pre-dating the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829 by some 36 years. [1]

Contents

History

The cathedral seen from the South Aisle Waterford Holy Trinity Cathedral Interior 2014 09 22.jpg
The cathedral seen from the South Aisle

The cathedral was designed by John Roberts in 1793 and has the distinction of being the oldest post-Reformation cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in Ireland. The cathedral was built under the direction of Rev. Dean Thomas Hearn, D.D., the cathedral dean. Roberts also designed Christ Church Cathedral, Waterford, and is said to have supervised the construction of the Catholic cathedral by attending the site every morning, and apparently 'died from the effects of a cold caught within the unfinished structure'. [1]

A chapel – known in the city as the 'Big Chapel' – had previously stood on the same ground, having been constructed there in 1693 at the height of the Penal Laws on the request of the Roman Catholic community of Waterford. The Big Chapel replaced a converted store, known as the Old Store, which was adopted as a place of worship following the Stuart Restoration in 1660, when conditions afforded Catholics some respite. The Old Store stood against the old northwest city wall, on a site opposite the west end of the present building. [2]

The cathedral was extended and modified many times over its history – it was initially to a square footprint, with later extensions to both the east and west ends of the building. The sanctuary was extended to the east in 1829–1837 during the episcopate of Bishop Abraham, and in 1854 Bishop Foran had the apse added, and a new altar installed. [2] The cathedral's grand William Hill & Sons organ was installed in 1858. Two side altars – dedicated to Our Lady (Epistle or South chapel), and to St Joseph (Gospel/North chapel) – were installed, as were external railings and gates (the latter removed in the 1960s), between 1855 and 1872, during Bishop O'Brien's time. [2]

Bishop John Power made some of the most significant additions – in 1881, he commissioned the baldachin, and a new altar (incorporating the front of its predecessor) and reredos. [2] Bishop Power also commissioned an elaborate polychrome decoration of the ceiling and walls. In 1883, Bishop Power commissioned George Goldie, London, to design the imposing Baroque-style pulpit, the fine choir stalls and the bishop's chair or cathedra. These items were carved in oak by Buisine & Fils of Lille in France. [2] The cathedral's fine stained glass windows were installed between 1883 and 1887, most commissioned from Mayer of Munich. In the final major 19th century modification, a classical, Ionic-form cut-stone external west facade was installed during Bishop Sheehan's time. Not all of these changes found immediate favour – 'neither the decorations of 1881 nor the improvements of 1893 commended themselves to the conservative Catholics of Waterford, who considered Bishop Power's scheme too gaudy and Bishop Sheehan's facade unnecessary and inferior" [1] .

Further changes occurred in the early 20th century, including side-extensions to the organ gallery, and changes to the entrance area under the organ gallery. In the 1930s, during the episcopate of Bishop Kinane, the cathedral was redecorated, and a matrix of steel rods was installed between the cathedral's columns, at capital level. These rods monitor the movement of the columns, which are built on the marshy foundations of the cathedral site. [2] Evidence of the degree of movement is easily seen on the north arcade of the nave.

The cathedral was refurbished in 1977, and to meet the requirements of the Second Vatican Council, the sanctuary was re-ordered. The choir stalls were moved to the outer walls, and the cathedra relocated, and whilst the side-chapels are now obscured, the fine stalls, cathedra and pulpit were at least retained and preserved. A new altar was installed so that Mass could be celebrated ad populum (facing the people) – this altar incorporates carvings from the sanctuary of St Carthage's Church, Lismore – 'a sensitive gesture to earlier history'. [2] In 1979, a gift of ten crystal chandeliers from Waterford Crystal enhanced the glory of the cathedral. A complete reflooring of the building and a restructuring of the sacristy took place between 1989 and 1992. Further work was completed in November 2006 including re-roofing of the cathedral. [3]

Cathedral administrators

The cathedral is, since 1810, a mensal parish, with the Bishop of Waterford and Lismore as parish priest, and an administrator appointed as priest in charge.

The cathedral sanctuary and baldachin WatCathedralSanct.jpg
The cathedral sanctuary and baldachin

Pastors of the ‘Big Chapel’

The new cathedral dean

On Dean Hearn's death Holy Trinity became a mensal parish, with administrators as follow:

The South Aisle, with a view to the Blessed Virgin Mary altar NorthAisle.jpg
The South Aisle, with a view to the Blessed Virgin Mary altar

Cathedral organ

Interior of the cathedral - from the Poole collection, c.1899. The photograph shows the Hill pipe organ in its 1858 form, and the Victorian painted ceiling decorations All Gods creatures got a place in the choir... - Flickr - National Library of Ireland on The Commons.jpg
Interior of the cathedral – from the Poole collection, c.1899. The photograph shows the Hill pipe organ in its 1858 form, and the Victorian painted ceiling decorations

The cathedral's pipe organ was built in 1858 by William Hill & Sons of London, and is the third organ installed in the cathedral. The first was built for the former Big Chapel in 1773, and presumably transferred to the new cathedral. This organ was, in turn, replaced by a one-manual organ built in 1826 by Calvin and William Porter Draper who maintained a workshop in Manor Street, Waterford in the early 19th century. The Draper brothers were of the Liverpool organbuilding family known by the alternative spelling Dreaper. [4]

The Hill organ was inaugurated on Sunday 29 August 1858 with the celebrated organist W.T. Best playing the inaugural recital. The 1858 organ had three manuals with 43 speaking stops, and was an example of the Hill's German system organ, with C-compass on all divisions, and full-compass Swell. The organ was hand blown, with mechanical action and a pneumatic-lever to the Great. [5]

The organ was conservatively rebuilt by the Hill firm in 1901, with only two tonal changes. The action was changed to tubular pneumatic, the key compass extended and a detached draw-stop console added, and a large hydraulic blowing plant installed. The blowing was converted to electric at some stage in the early 20th century. The organ was extensively rebuilt by the Irish Organ Company in 1963. Significant tonal and structural changes were made, the action converted to electro-pneumatic, the compass extended and a detached stop-key console installed. [5]

Organist and choirmasters

[5]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sacred Heart Cathedral (Davenport, Iowa)</span> Church in Iowa, United States

Sacred Heart Cathedral, located in Davenport, Iowa, United States, is a Catholic cathedral and a parish church in the Diocese of Davenport. The cathedral is located on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River to the east of Downtown Davenport. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Cathedral Complex. This designation includes the church building, rectory, and the former convent, which was torn down in 2012. The cathedral is adjacent to the Cork Hill Historic District, also on the National Register. Its location on Cork Hill, a section of the city settled by Irish immigrants, gives the cathedral its nickname Cork Hill Cathedral.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament (Sacramento, California)</span> Church in California, United States

The Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento, in Sacramento, capital of the state of California. The cathedral holds the diocesan bishop’s throne or “cathedra”, which represents the bishop's teaching authority over his flock. The present ordinary of the Diocese of Sacramento is Jaime Soto, appointed by Pope Benedict XVI. The cathedral is located downtown at the intersection of 11th and K Streets.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist (Charleston, South Carolina)</span> Church in South Carolina , United States

The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston, located in Charleston, South Carolina. Designed by Brooklyn architect Patrick Keely in the Gothic Revival style, it opened in 1907. The Most Reverend Jacques E. Fabre, the fourteenth Bishop of Charleston, was ordained and installed on May 13, 2022

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas, Galway</span> Church in County Galway, Ireland

The Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas, commonly known as Galway Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Galway, Ireland, and one of the largest and most impressive buildings in the city.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament (Altoona, Pennsylvania)</span> Church in Pennsylvania, United States

The Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament is a Roman Catholic cathedral located at One Cathedral Square in Altoona, Pennsylvania. It is within the boundaries of the Downtown Altoona Historic District, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. It is the mother church of the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown and is the seat of its bishop, the Most Reverend Mark Leonard Bartchak. The Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament Pastor is Rev. Monsignor Stanley B. Carson, Administrator.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Northampton Cathedral</span> Church in Northamptonshire, England

The Cathedral Church of St Mary and St Thomas is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Northampton, England. It is the seat of the Bishop of Northampton and mother church of the Diocese of Northampton which covers the counties of Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and part of Berkshire north of the River Thames. The cathedral is situated in the north of the town, along the Barrack Road.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral Basilica of Christ the King</span> Church in Hamilton, Ontario

The Cathedral Basilica of Christ the King is a Roman Catholic church in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The cathedral was consecrated on December 19, 1933. It is the seat of the Bishop of the Diocese of Hamilton, and the cathedral of the Diocese of Hamilton. The cathedral contains the cathedra of the Bishop, the Most Rev. Douglas Crosby. The cathedral was raised to the status of a minor basilica in February 2013 by Pope Benedict XVI.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Roman Catholic Diocese of Wagga Wagga</span> Catholic ecclesiastical territory

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Wagga Wagga is a Latin Rite suffragan diocese of the Archdiocese of Sydney, established in 1917, covering the Riverina region of New South Wales in Australia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Patrick Kelly (bishop of Waterford and Lismore)</span>

Patrick Kelly was an Irish prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as the first bishop of the Diocese of Richmond in Virginia (1820–1822) and as bishop of the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore in Ireland (1822–1829).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">St Patrick's Cathedral, Auckland</span> Church in Auckland Central City, New Zealand

The Cathedral of St Patrick and St Joseph is a Catholic church in Auckland CBD, situated on the corner of Federal Street and Wyndham St. It is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Auckland and the cathedral of the Bishop of Auckland.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral Church of Saint Paul (Des Moines, Iowa)</span> Church in Iowa, United States

St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral, is located in downtown Des Moines, Iowa, United States. It is the cathedral church of the Episcopal Diocese of Iowa. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as St. Paul's Episcopal Church.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral of Saint Peter (Wilmington, Delaware)</span> Historic church in Delaware, United States

The Cathedral of Saint Peter is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Wilmington. Located on West 6th Street in Wilmington, Delaware. the cathedral is in the Quaker Hill Historic District of the city.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral of the Assumption, Carlow</span> Church in Carlow, Ireland

The Cathedral of the Assumption is both the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Kildare and Leighlin and the parish church for the cathedral parish. Located in Carlow town, the cathedral was dedicated to the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in 1833. It is known for its beautifully detailed 151 ft (46 m) spire which is one of the highest points in the town.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Roman Catholic Diocese of Cloyne</span> Catholic diocese in Ireland

The Diocese of Cloyne is a Roman Catholic diocese in Ireland. It is one of six suffragan dioceses in the ecclesiastical province of Cashel.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cathedral of the Holy Angels (Gary, Indiana)</span> Church in Indiana, United States

The Cathedral of the Holy Angels is a Catholic cathedral located in Gary, Indiana, United States. It is the seat of the Diocese of Gary, and the home of Holy Angels Parish.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">St John's College, Waterford</span>

St John's College was a Roman Catholic seminary founded in 1807 for the diocese of Waterford and Lismore.

Nicholas Foran was the Roman Catholic Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. Born in Butlerstown, Co. Waterford, he studied locally and went to Maynooth College to study for the priesthood. He was ordained in 1808, moving back to Waterford where he was Professor in the Diocesan College, in 1814 he was appointed president of St. John's College, Waterford. He served as parish priest in Lismore and then in Dungarvan, County Waterford.

William Abraham DD, was the Roman Catholic Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. He was born in Glendine, County Cork to Henry Abraham a blacksmith and Margaret Broderick, the family moved to o Headborough, Co. Waterford where Abraham was brought up.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Holy Name of Jesus Cathedral (Raleigh, North Carolina)</span> Church in North Carolina, United States

Holy Name of Jesus Cathedral is a Catholic cathedral that is the seat of the Diocese of Raleigh, replacing Sacred Heart Cathedral.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">St Patrick's Catholic Church, Waterford</span> Anglican church in Cork, Ireland

St Patrick's Catholic Church is a Roman Catholic parish church in Jenkin's Lane in the city of Waterford, Ireland. It is one of the oldest surviving Irish Catholic churches to have been built after the Reformation in Ireland.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Power, M.R.I.A., D.Litt, Canon Patrick (1937). Waterford & Lismore – A Compendious History of the United Dioceses,. Cork: Cork University Press, Longman. pp. 271–272.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Olden, Rt Rev Mgr Michael (1993). History and Guide of The Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity Waterford. Waterford. p. 15.
  3. "Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Waterford – Home Page". 12 January 2013.
  4. Forde, D – The Organs of the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Waterford 2006. Directory of British Organbuilders
  5. 1 2 3 Forde, D – The Organs of the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Waterford 2006