Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly

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Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly

Archidioecesis Casheliensis et Emeliensis

Ard-Deoise Chaisil agus Imligh
ThurlesCathedral.JPG
Location
Country Ireland
TerritoryMost of County Tipperary and part of County Limerick
Ecclesiastical province Cashel and Emly
Statistics
Area1,190 sq mi (3,100 km2)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2018)
81,981
79,505 (97.0%)
Parishes46
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Rite Latin
Established10 May 1718
Cathedral Cathedral of the Assumption, Thurles
Patron saint St Ailbe
Secular priests 77 (as of 2018)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Metropolitan Archbishop Kieran O'Reilly, Archbishop of Cashel
Vicar GeneralArchdeacon Eugene Everard
Bishops emeritus Dermot Clifford, Archbishop of Cashel
Map
Roman Catholic Diocese of Cashel and Emly map.png
Website
cashel-emly.ie

The Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly (Irish : Ard-Deoise Chaisil agus Imligh) is an ecclesiastical territory or archdiocese of the Catholic Church (particularly the Roman Catholic or Latin Church) located in mid-western Ireland and the metropolis of the eponymous ecclesiastical province.

Contents

The cathedral church of the archdiocese is the Cathedral of the Assumption in Thurles, County Tipperary.

The incumbent archbishop of the archdiocese is Kieran O'Reilly.

History

The original dioceses of Cashel and Emly were established by the Synod of Ráth Breasail in 1111. [1]

Diocese of Cashel

The Diocese of Cashel was elevated to the rank of ecclesiastical province, which was roughly co-extensive with the traditional province of Munster, by the Synod of Kells in 1152. Since the Papal Legate, Giovanni Paparoni, awarded the pallium to Donat O'Lonergan in 1158, his successors have ruled the ecclesiastical province of Cashel also sometimes known as Munster until 26 January 2015. [1]

Diocese of Emly

The Diocese of Emly took its name from the eponymous village in County Tipperary, which was the location of the principal church of the Eóghanacht dynasty. [2] [3]

Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly

The original Roman Catholic dioceses of Cashel and Emly had been governed by the same bishop since 10 May 1718, with the Archbishop of Cashel acting as Apostolic Administrator of Emly until they were united on 26 January 2015 to form the new metropolitan see of Cashel and Emly. [4]

Church of Ireland

Following the Reformation in Ireland, the two Church of Ireland dioceses of Cashel and Emly were united in 1569. This union lasted until 1976, at which point the diocese of Cashel was merged into the Diocese of Cashel and Ossory, while the diocese of Emly was merged into the Diocese of Limerick and Killaloe.

Geography

Ecclesiastical province

The ecclesiastical province is one of four that make up the Catholic Church in Ireland; the others being Armagh, Dublin, and Tuam.

The six suffragan dioceses of the province are:

Archdiocese

The archdiocese is divided into 46 parishes, which are spread across two counties: 35 in Tipperary and 11 in Limerick. The parishes are grouped into eight deaneries. [5]

As of April 2018, there were 79 priests in the diocese. [6]

Aside from the cathedral town of Thurles, the main towns in the diocese are Ballina, Caherconlish, Cashel, Fethard, Templemore, and Tipperary.

Parishes in Cashel and Emly ParishesInCashelAndEmlyWithLegend3.jpg
Parishes in Cashel and Emly
DeaneryParishes
Murroe
Tipperary
Thurles
Ballingarry
Hospital
Galbally
Cashel
Fethard
  • Clerihan
  • Fethard and Killusty

Ordinaries

The following is a list of the ten most recent archbishops:

See also

Related Research Articles

Thurles Town in Munster, Ireland

Thurles is a town in County Tipperary, Ireland. It is located in the civil parish of same name in the barony of Eliogarty and in the ecclesiastical parish of Thurles. The cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly is located in the town.

Cashel, County Tipperary Town in Munster, Ireland

Cashel is a town in County Tipperary in Ireland. Its population was 4,422 in the 2016 census. The town gives its name to the ecclesiastical province of Cashel. Additionally, the cathedra of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly was originally in the town prior to the English Reformation. It is part of the parish of Cashel and Rosegreen in the same archdiocese. One of the six cathedrals of the Anglican Bishop of Cashel and Ossory, who currently resides in Kilkenny, is located in the town. It is in the civil parish of St. Patricksrock which is in the historical barony of Middle Third.

Synod of Ráth Breasail

The Synod of Ráth Breasail was an Irish Catholic church council which took place in Ireland in 1111. It marked the transition of the Irish church from a monastic to a diocesan and parish-based church. Many Irish present day dioceses trace their boundaries to decisions made at the synod.

The Archbishop of Cashel was an archiepiscopal title which took its name after the town of Cashel, County Tipperary in Ireland. Following the Reformation, there had been parallel apostolic successions to the title: one in the Church of Ireland and the other in the Roman Catholic Church. The archbishop of each denomination also held the title of Bishop of Emly. The Church of Ireland title was downgraded to a bishopric in 1838, and in the Roman Catholic Church it was superseded by the role of Archbishop of Cashel and Emly when the two dioceses were united in 2015.

Province of Dublin (Church of Ireland) Ecclesiastical province of the Church of Ireland

The United Provinces of Dublin and Cashel, commonly called the Province of Dublin, and also known as the Southern Province, is one of the two ecclesiastical provinces that together form the Church of Ireland; the other is the Province of Armagh. The province has existed since 1833 when the ancient Province of Dublin was merged with the Province of Cashel. Its metropolitan bishop is the Archbishop of Dublin.

The Synod of Kells took place in 1152, under the presidency of Giovanni Cardinal Paparoni, and continued the process begun at the Synod of Ráth Breasail (1111) of reforming the Irish church. The sessions were divided between the abbeys of Kells and Mellifont, and in later times the synod has been called the Synod of Kells-Mellifont and the Synod of Mellifont-Kells.

Emly Village in Munster, Ireland

Emly or Emlybeg is a village in County Tipperary, Ireland. It is a civil parish in the historical barony of Clanwilliam. It is also an Ecclesiastical parish in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly.

The Bishop of Killaloe is an episcopal title which takes its name after the town of Killaloe in County Clare, Ireland. In the Roman Catholic Church it remains a separate title, but in the Church of Ireland it has been united with other bishoprics.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Limerick

The Diocese of Limerick is a Roman Catholic diocese in mid-western Ireland, one of six suffragan dioceses in the ecclesiastical province of Cashel and Emly.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Killaloe

The Diocese of Killaloe is a Roman Catholic diocese in mid-western Ireland, one of six suffragan dioceses in the ecclesiastical province of Cashel and Emly.

Diocese of Limerick and Killaloe

The Diocese of Limerick and Killaloe is a diocese of the Church of Ireland that is located in mid-western Ireland. The diocese was formed by a merger of neighbouring dioceses in 1976. It is in the ecclesiastical province of Dublin. It is one of the twelve Church of Ireland dioceses that cover the whole of Ireland. The diocese covers all of counties Limerick, Kerry and Clare, plus parts of counties Galway, Cork and Tipperary.

Patrick Leahy (bishop)

Patrick Leahy (1806–1875) was the Archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly.

The Bishop of Kilfenora was a separate episcopal title which took its name after the village of Kilfenora in County Clare in the Republic of Ireland. In both the Church of Ireland and the Roman Catholic Church, the title is now united with other bishoprics.

St. Johns Cathedral, Cashel Church in Co. Tipperary, Ireland

The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Baptist and Saint Patrick's Rock is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Cashel, County Tipperary in Ireland. It is in the ecclesiastical province of Dublin.

The Bishop of Cashel and Waterford was the Ordinary of the Church of Ireland diocese of Cashel and Waterford; comprising all of County Waterford, the southern part of County Tipperary and a small part of County Limerick, Ireland.

The Bishop of Emly was a separate episcopal title which took its name after the village of Emly in County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland. In both the Church of Ireland and the Roman Catholic Church, it has been united with other sees.

Middle Third is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Cashel. The barony lies between Eliogarty to the north, Iffa and Offa East to the south, Clanwilliam to the west and Slievardagh to the east. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Kieran OReilly (bishop)

Kieran O'Reilly SMA KC*HS is the Archbishop of Cashel and Emly. He was installed in the see on 8 February 2015 having been translated from the see of Killaloe.

Thurles (Roman Catholic parish) Parish in Ireland

Thurles is an ecclesiastical parish in the Thurles deanery of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly in Ireland.

References

  1. 1 2 "Cashel and Emly (Archdiocese)". Catholic Hierarchy. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 2 April 2021.
  2. "Emly (Diocese)". Catholic Hierarchy. Archived from the original on 22 January 2021. Retrieved 2 April 2021.
  3. "CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Cashel". New Advent. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 2 April 2021.
  4. "Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly, Ireland". GCatholic. Archived from the original on 14 July 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2021.
  5. "Cashel & Emly - Deanery Map". homepage.tinet.ie. Archived from the original on 28 October 2020. Retrieved 2 April 2021.
  6. Baker, Noel (3 April 2018). "Special Report - Diocese by diocese: The state of the Catholic Church on the island of Ireland today". Irish Examiner . Archived from the original on 27 February 2021. Retrieved 2 April 2021.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.Missing or empty |title= (help)

Coordinates: 52°40′44″N7°48′50″W / 52.67889°N 7.81389°W / 52.67889; -7.81389