Charlie Waters

Last updated
Charlie Waters
Charlie Waters signs autographs Jan 2014.jpg
Waters in January 2014
No. 41
Position: Safety
Personal information
Born: (1948-09-10) September 10, 1948 (age 70)
Miami, Florida
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:193 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school: North Augusta (SC)
College: Clemson
NFL Draft: 1970  / Round:  3  / Pick: 66
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:41
INT yards:584
Interception TDs:2
Fumble Recoveries:7
Games played:160
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Charlie Tutan Waters (born September 10, 1948) is a former American football player, a safety in the National Football League for twelve seasons, all with the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Clemson University.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

National Football League Professional American football league

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The NFL is one of the four major professional sports leagues in North America, and the highest professional level of American football in the world. The NFL's 17-week regular season runs from early September to late December, with each team playing 16 games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, six teams from each conference advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, which is usually held in the first Sunday in February, and is played between the champions of the NFC and AFC.

Dallas Cowboys National Football League franchise in Arlington, Texas

The Dallas Cowboys are a professional American football team based in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. The Cowboys compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team is headquartered in Frisco, Texas, and plays its home games at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, which opened for the 2009 season. The stadium took its current name prior to the 2013 season. The Cowboys joined the NFL as an expansion team in 1960. The team's national following might best be represented by its NFL record of consecutive sell-outs. The Cowboys' streak of 190 consecutive sold-out regular and post-season games began in 2002. The franchise has made it to the Super Bowl eight times, tied with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Denver Broncos for second most Super Bowl appearances in history, just behind the New England Patriots record eleven Super Bowl appearances. This has also corresponded to eight NFC championships, most in the NFC. The Cowboys have won five of those Super Bowl appearances, tying them with their NFC rivals, the San Francisco 49ers; both are second to Pittsburgh's and New England’s record six Super Bowl championships. The Cowboys are the only NFL team to record 20 straight winning seasons (1966–85), in which they missed the playoffs only twice.

Contents

Early years

Born in Miami, Florida, Waters' family moved to South Carolina where he attended North Augusta High School, starring as a football and baseball athlete.

Miami City in Florida, United States

Miami, officially the City of Miami, is the cultural, economic and financial center of South Florida. Miami is the seat of Miami-Dade County, the most populous county in Florida. The city covers an area of about 56.6 square miles (147 km2), between the Everglades to the west and Biscayne Bay on the east; with a 2018 estimated population of 470,914, Miami is the sixth most densely populated major city in the United States. The Miami metropolitan area is home to 6.1 million people and the seventh-largest metropolitan area in the nation. Miami's metro area is the second-most populous metropolis in the southeastern United States and fourth-largest urban area in the U.S. Miami has the third tallest skyline in the United States with over 300 high-rises, 80 of which stand taller than 400 feet.

Florida State of the United States of America

Florida is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States. The state is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the northwest by Alabama, to the north by Georgia, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the south by the Straits of Florida. Florida is the 22nd-most extensive, the 3rd-most populous, and the 8th-most densely populated of the U.S. states. Jacksonville is the most populous municipality in the state and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. The Miami metropolitan area is Florida's most populous urban area. Tallahassee is the state's capital.

South Carolina State of the United States of America

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States and the easternmost of the Deep South. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River.

He was a split end early in his football career before being converted to a quarterback. He was selected to play in the 1965 Shrine Bowl and graduated in 1966. [1]

Quarterback position in gridiron football

A quarterback, colloquially known as the "signal caller", is a position in American and Canadian football. Quarterbacks are members of the offensive team and line up directly behind the offensive line. In modern American football, the quarterback is usually considered the leader of the offensive team, and is often responsible for calling the play in the huddle. The quarterback also touches the ball on almost every offensive play, and is the offensive player that almost always throws forward passes.

The Shrine Bowl was a postseason college football bowl game. The first game was played on December 18, 1948, at War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock, Arkansas between Hardin–Simmons University and Ouachita Baptist College. The 1949 edition was held in Carbondale, Illinois as the Indiana State Sycamores faced the Salukies of Southern Illinois University.

College career

Waters signed a football scholarship at Clemson University. As a junior in 1968, he competed with Billy Ammons for the starting quarterback job, winning it after Ammons hurt his knee in spring practice. After a 0-3-1 start, Ammons was made starting quarterback again and Waters moved to split end for the remaining 15 games of his college career. As a senior, he caught 44 passes for 738 yards, and even though his season was cut short with a shoulder separation, [2] his record stood until Jerry Butler broke it in 1977. [3]

Clemson Tigers football College Football Bowl Subdivision team; member of Atlantic Coast Conference

The Clemson Tigers, known traditionally as the "Clemson University Fighting Tigers,” represent Clemson University in the sport of American football. The Tigers compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Consistently ranked among the most elite college football programs in the United States, the team is known for its storied history, distinctive helmet, fight song and colors as well as the many traditions associated with the school.

Jerry O'Dell Butler is a former professional American football wide receiver in the National Football League. He played his entire career with the Buffalo Bills (1979–1986). Butler was a Pro Bowl selection in 1980. In his career, he caught 278 receptions for 4,301 yards and 29 touchdowns. On September 23, 1979, Butler had 255 receiving yards and 4 touchdowns for the Bills in a win over the New York Jets. Butler coached wide receivers in 1999 and 2000 for Cleveland, then served as Director of Player Development for the Cleveland Browns until his firing in 2011.

A three-year letterman, Waters was an All-ACC selection in 1969 at wide receiver as a senior. [4] During his Clemson career, he caught 68 passes for 1,196 yards and 17.1 yards per catch, to go along with four touchdown receptions. He still ranks eighth all-time for yards per reception and eighteenth all-time in receiving yards.

A wide receiver, also referred to as wideouts or simply receivers, is an offensive position in American and Canadian football, and is a key player. They get their name because they are split out "wide", farthest away from the rest of the team. Wide receivers are among the fastest players on the field. The wide receiver functions as the pass-catching up with specialist.

Touchdown means of scoring in both American and Canadian football

A touchdown is a scoring play in both American and Canadian football. Whether running, passing, returning a kickoff or punt, or recovering a turnover, a team scores a touchdown by advancing the ball into the opponent's end zone.

In 1981, he was inducted into the Clemson Athletic Hall of Fame. He was also inducted into the North Augusta Sports Hall of Fame and the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame. [5]

Professional career

Waters was selected by the Dallas Cowboys as a defensive back in the third round (66th overall) of the 1970 NFL draft. Although he was nearly released during training camp, his conversion was successful and became the backup to Cliff Harris at free safety as a rookie in 1970. He ended up starting 6 games after Harris had to serve military duty. Waters had 5 interceptions that season, as the Cowboys would go on to lose Super Bowl V. His performance was good enough to make the NFL all-rookie team in 1970. [6]

The next year, he was moved to cornerback, where he struggled for four years in a backup and starter role. [7] Waters was eventually moved to Strong Safety in 1975 to replace Cowboys great Cornell Green, responding with 3 interceptions for 55 yards and a touchdown. That season, the Cowboys won the NFC Championship but lost Super Bowl X to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

As a strong safety he became an All-Pro and along with Cliff Harris, formed one of the best safety tandems of that era. He was like a coach on the field, with excellent instincts and the athletic ability, to become one of the league’s top defensive players of the decade. [8] He was selected All-Pro twice (1977 and 1978) and to the Pro Bowl three consecutive seasons (1976-1978).

In 1979, Waters suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in his right knee during a preseason game against the Seattle Seahawks, forcing him to sit out the entire year. [9] He returned in 1980 and had 5 interceptions. After getting 3 interceptions in 1981, he retired with 41 interceptions, third-most in franchise history. He also played in 25 playoff games, which ranks 5th in NFL history.

Waters played 12 seasons in the NFL, never experienced a losing season and only missed the playoffs once (1974) during that span. He played in five Super Bowls: V, VI, X, XII, and XIII, with victories in VI and XII. He holds the NFL record for most playoff interceptions with 9, including 3 in one playoff game, and has the unique achievement of blocking 4 punts in 2 consecutive games. He also was team's holder for placekicks.

After retirement

Waters spent the 1983 NFL season in the broadcast booth for CBS Sports, with Tom Brookshier on play-by-play. It was Waters who first admonished Brookshier after the latter commented during a college basketball promo that players for the Louisville Cardinals had "a collective IQ of about 40," resulting in Brookshier being removed from calling NFL games for the remainder of the season. [10]

Personal life

Waters retired and became an NFL and college football coach. He was the defensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos in 1993 and 1994, and then for the University of Oregon in 1995. Late that season, his oldest son Cody died in Eugene in his sleep on December 4, 1995, 12 days before his 18th birthday. [11] He and his wife Rosie Holotik, actress and model, at the time had two more sons, Ben and Cliff (after Cliff Harris). [12]

He was nominated for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2001, but was not elected.

In 2006, the Dallas Cowboys hired Waters as the new color commentator for the Cowboys Radio Network, working alongside Brad Sham when former color commentator and Dallas quarterback Babe Laufenberg resigned his post to spend time with his family.

Outside of football, he works with longtime teammate Cliff Harris at a gas marketing company. In February 2007, Waters announced that he would be leaving the radio booth after only one season, citing a busy work schedule that did not allow him enough time to prepare for the game broadcasts. [13]

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References

  1. "Waters Has been Impressive". Herald-Journal. March 19, 1967. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  2. "Clemson-Carolina Tilt For Runners, Not The Receivers". Heral Journal. November 21, 1969. p. 9. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  3. Vince Moore (April 8, 1972). "Waters Confirms Retirement". Herald-Journal/The Anderson Independent-Mail . p. 21. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  4. Bob Bradley (September 3, 1970). "It Seems Strange, But Clemson Team Is Minus Head Tiger Frank Howard". The Item . p. 29. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  5. "Waters Is Named To Hall Of Fame". April 20, 1980. p. 8. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  6. Luther Gailard (March 14, 1971). "Lucky Breaks Help Waters". Herald-Journal. p. 7. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  7. "Waters of Cowboys Plays Anywhere". The Milwaukee Journal . September 27, 1972. p. 108. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  8. Dave Anderson (January 15, 1979). "Two Safeties Are Contrasts For Cowboys". The Dispatch. p. 30. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  9. "Waters Undergoes Knee Surgery". Star News. August 14, 1979. p. 18. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  10. "TV Sports; Dilemma for CBS over Louisville game". New York Times. December 20, 1983. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  11. "Autopsy fails to determine cause of death". Eugene Register-Guard. Associated Press. December 6, 1995. p. 1B.
  12. Bellamy, Ron (December 20, 1998). "Living with tragic loss". Eugene Register-Guard. p. 1F.
  13. Rob Phillips (February 15, 2007). "Waters Stepping Down From Radio Booth". Archived from the original on 2007-02-18. Retrieved February 16, 2007.