Chelsea Common

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Chelsea Common was the ground of Chelsea Cricket Club in the 18th century, an area that virtually disappeared under building work in the 19th century. [1]

Records have survived of five matches between 1731 and 1789 which either involved the Chelsea club or were played on the common. The first, played on the common for the high stake of 50 guineas, was Chelsea v Fulham in July 1731. [2] In August 1736 there was an inter-county match on the common between Middlesex and Surrey. The stake was 50 guineas and Middlesex won by 9 runs. [3]

Guinea (coin) coin of approximately one quarter ounce of gold that was minted in Great Britain between 1663 and 1814

The guinea was a coin of approximately one quarter ounce of gold that was minted in Great Britain between 1663 and 1814. The name came from the Guinea region in West Africa, where much of the gold used to make the coins originated. It was the first English machine-struck gold coin, originally worth one pound sterling, equal to twenty shillings, but rises in the price of gold relative to silver caused the value of the guinea to increase, at times to as high as thirty shillings. From 1717 to 1816, its value was officially fixed at twenty-one shillings.

Middlesex county cricket teams in England have been traced back to the 18th century, although cricket in the area goes back further.

Surrey county cricket teams have been traced back to the 17th century, but Surrey's involvement in cricket goes back much further than that. The first definite mention of cricket anywhere in the world is dated c.1550 in Guildford.

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References

  1. Chelsea Common
  2. Waghorn, H. T. (1906). The Dawn of Cricket. Electric Press. p. 9.
  3. Buckley, G. B. (1935). Fresh Light on 18th Century Cricket. Cotterell. p. 13.

Coordinates: 51°29′20″N0°10′23.88″W / 51.48889°N 0.1733000°W / 51.48889; -0.1733000

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.