Cold Fusion (novel)

Last updated

Cold Fusion
Cold Fusion.jpg
Author Lance Parkin
Series Doctor Who book:
Virgin Missing Adventures
Release number
29
SubjectFeaturing:
Fifth Doctor; Seventh Doctor
Adric, Nyssa, Tegan; Chris, Roz
Set inPeriod between
Castrovalva and
Four to Doomsday
Publisher Virgin Books
Publication date
December 1996
ISBN 0-426-20489-1
Preceded by The Plotters  
Followed by Burning Heart  

Cold Fusion is an original novel written by Lance Parkin and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who . [1] It features the Fifth Doctor, with Adric, Nyssa, and Tegan, immediately after Castrovalva . Also appearing is the Seventh Doctor, with Chris and Roz, from between the Virgin New Adventures novels Return of the Living Dad and The Death of Art . [2] It was the only one of the Virgin Doctor Who novels to feature more than one Doctor. [3]

Contents

Synopsis

The Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Adric and Nyssa arrive on an unnamed ice planet (which goes unnamed throughout the novel), which has settlements at the equator and not anywhere else. The planet is run by the Scientifica, a technocratic society allied with the Earth Empire, but there is a more than usual presence of Adjudicators on the planet. Tegan and Nyssa get a hotel room where they run into a man who claims to be "Bruce Jovanka" with a bad Australian accent, while the Doctor and Adric enter the Scientifica's complex and encounter three very diverse characters: Whitfield, the woman who runs the Scientifica; Tertullian Medford, the primary Adjudicator on the planet; and a badly decaying woman who the Doctor subsequently learns is Gallifreyan when she regenerates and nicknames "Patience" (she was previously known as only the Patient).

When the Doctor and Adric are ambushed by a beautiful black woman on the skitrain tracks, then arrested for being alien spies, Tegan and Nyssa run into their own troubles with the husky blond "Bruce". And all the meanwhile, a little man is elsewhere on the planet, investigating a strange machine found buried in the subterranean soil.

Notes

The story deliberately contrasts the characterisation of the Fifth Doctor and of the Seventh Doctor in the Virgin New Adventures. [4]

In an interview for the BBC, in discussing Cold Fusion, Parkin described the character of Adric as "hopeless with Davison". [5]

Cold Fusion includes many references to the Cartmel Masterplan which would be more fully explored in Lungbarrow . More is learned about the character of Patience in the BBC Past Doctor Adventures novel The Infinity Doctors , also by Lance Parkin. It is suggested that she is the Doctor's (or possibly The Other's) wife, but how she fits into normal continuity is deliberately not revealed. [1]

Notably, this novel features a sequence in which the Doctor recalls his life on Gallifrey and in which this earlier Doctor has recently regenerated in a form heavily inferred to be one of the "Morbius Doctors" seen in the mind bending sequence of the serial The Brain of Morbius , specifically the incarnation which was represented by an image of Douglas Camfield. While it is inferred in this book to be an incarnation of the Doctor, the novel Lungbarrow suggests it may in fact be an incarnation of the Other. [6]

Names in the book are very similar to those of the main characters (and the actors) in the BBC comedy Terry and June, so the book includes a Medford, a Whitfield, a Scott, and a Terry and June. [4]

Adaptation

In July 2016, Big Finish Productions announced that they would release an audio drama adaptation of the novel, with Peter Davison, Sylvester McCoy, Janet Fielding, Sarah Sutton and Matthew Waterhouse reprising their television roles as the Fifth and Seventh Doctors, Tegan Jovanka, Nyssa and Adric respectively. In addition, Yasmin Bannerman and Travis Oliver reprise their roles as the Seventh Doctor's companions Roz Forrester and Chris Cwej from Big Finish's adaptations of the New Adventures novels Damaged Goods and Original Sin . [7]

Reception

Readers of Doctor Who Magazine gave the novel a rating of 76.69% (from 845 votes). [8]

[9]

Related Research Articles

Omega (<i>Doctor Who</i>)

Omega is a fictional character created by Bob Baker and Dave Martin for the British science fiction television series, Doctor Who. In the context of the series, Omega is known as one of the founders of the Time Lords of the planet Gallifrey, and is a revered figure in Time Lord history together with the equally legendary Rassilon; the Third Doctor refers to him as the Time Lords' "greatest hero". Omega first appeared in the 10th anniversary story, The Three Doctors.

Lance Parkin is a British author, best known for writing fiction and reference books for television series, in particular Doctor Who and Emmerdale. He also worked on the Emmerdale television series as a production assistant.

Tegan Jovanka Fictional character in the TV series Doctor Who

Tegan Jovanka is a fictional character played by Janet Fielding in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. An Australian airline stewardess and a native of Brisbane who was a companion of the Fourth and Fifth Doctors, she was a regular in the programme from 1981 to 1984. Tegan appeared in 19 stories.

Nyssa (<i>Doctor Who</i>) Fictional character in the TV series Doctor Who

Nyssa is a fictional character in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. She is played by Sarah Sutton. Although Nyssa was created by writer Johnny Byrne for a single Fourth Doctor serial The Keeper of Traken, the production team subsequently decided she should be retained as a continuing character. Nyssa returned in the following serial, Logopolis, in which the Fourth Doctor regenerated, and remained as a companion of the Fifth Doctor. She was a regular in the programme from 1981 to 1983.

Adric

Adric is a fictional character played by Matthew Waterhouse in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. He was a young native of the planet Alzarius, which exists in the parallel universe of E-Space. A companion of the Fourth and Fifth Doctors, he was a regular in the programme from 1980 to 1982 and appeared in 11 stories. The name Adric is an anagram derived from Nobel Prize-winning physicist Paul Dirac.

Logopolis is the seventh and final serial of the 18th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 28 February to 21 March 1981. It was Tom Baker's last story as the Fourth Doctor and marks the first appearance of Peter Davison as the Fifth Doctor and Janet Fielding as new companion Tegan Jovanka.

The Brain of Morbius is the fifth serial of the 13th season of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts on BBC1 from 3 to 24 January 1976. The on-screen writer credit is given to Robin Bland, a pseudonym for writer and former script editor Terrance Dicks, whose original script had been heavily rewritten by his successor as script editor, Robert Holmes. It is the first serial to feature the Sisterhood of Karn.

The Other (<i>Doctor Who</i>)

The Other is a fictional character in the British science fiction franchise Doctor Who. A legendary figure in Time Lord history, the Other was only alluded to in the television series, but is featured several times in spin-off media based on the programme.

Fifth Doctor

The Fifth Doctor is an incarnation of the Doctor, the protagonist of the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. He is portrayed by Peter Davison.

Douglas Gaston Sydney Camfield was a British television director, active from the 1960s to the 1980s.

Roslyn Sarah Inyathi Forrester, usually just known as Roz Forrester, is a fictional character from the Virgin New Adventures range of spin-offs based on the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who.

<i>Lungbarrow</i>

Lungbarrow is an original novel written by Marc Platt and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. Published in Virgin Books' New Adventures range, it was the last of that range to feature the Seventh Doctor.

The Cartmel Masterplan is a fan name for the planned Doctor Who backstory developed primarily by Andrew Cartmel, Ben Aaronovitch and Marc Platt, by which they intended to restore some of the mystery of the Doctor's background that had been lost through revelation of the existing backstory. Although hints were dropped in the last two seasons, the proposed revelations never materialised on screen as the programme was not renewed for another season in 1990.

<i>Just War</i> (novel)

Just War is a novel by Lance Parkin from the Virgin New Adventures. The New Adventures were based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. The novel featured the characters of the Seventh Doctor, Bernice Summerfield, Chris Cwej and Roz Forrester.

<i>Divided Loyalties</i> (novel)

Divided Loyalties is a BBC Books original novel written by Gary Russell and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It features the Fifth Doctor, Tegan Jovanka, Nyssa, Adric and the Celestial Toymaker.

<i>The Death of Art</i>

The Death of Art is a novel by Simon Bucher-Jones published in 1996 and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It features the Seventh Doctor, Chris, Roz and Ace. It is part of the Psi Powers series of novels.

<i>The Darkening Eye</i>

The Darkening Eye is a Big Finish Productions audiobook based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who.

Psychodrome is a Big Finish Productions audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who.

Iterations of I is a Big Finish Productions audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who.

Borusa

Borusa is a fictional character in the series Doctor Who. Within the context of the series, Borusa is a former teacher of the Doctor who appears in four serials. Notably, Borusa was portrayed by a different actor in each appearance, it being implied that the character had regenerated.

References

  1. 1 2 Parkin, Lance; Lars Pearson (2007). AHistory: An Unauthorized History of the Doctor Who universe (2nd ed.). Des Moines, Iowa: Mad Norwegian Press. ISBN   978-0-9759446-6-0.
  2. "Shelf Life" (review) by Dave Owen, Doctor Who Magazine, #246
  3. Pearson, Lars (1999). I, Who: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who Novels (1st ed.). Des Moines, Iowa: Mad Norwegian Press. ISBN   0-9673746-0-X.
  4. 1 2 FTN interviews Doctor Who writer Lance Parkin, 13 January 2013
  5. Interview (Lance Parkin), BBC, January 2004 (Wayback Machine archive)
  6. Parkin, Lance & Pearson, Lars (2012). A History: An Unauthorised History of the Doctor Who Universe (3rd Edition), p. 715. Mad Norwegian Press, Des Moines. ISBN   978-193523411-1.
  7. "Big Finish releases - "Cold Fusion"" . Retrieved 14 October 2016.
  8. "The best (and worst) of Virgin", by Dave Owen, Doctor Who Magazine, No. 265 (May 1998)
  9. "Big Finish releases - "Cold Fusion"". Big Finish. Retrieved 14 October 2016.