Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing

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Seal of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Seal of the United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing.svg
Seal of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

The Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing is the head of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing within the United States Department of the Treasury. The current Director is Leonard R. Olijar.

Bureau of Engraving and Printing government agency under the U.S. Treasury that prints paper money and distributes Treasury securities

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is a government agency within the United States Department of the Treasury that designs and produces a variety of security products for the United States government, most notable of which is Federal Reserve Notes for the Federal Reserve, the nation's central bank. In addition to paper currency, the BEP produces Treasury securities; military commissions and award certificates; invitations and admission cards; and many different types of identification cards, forms, and other special security documents for a variety of government agencies. The BEP does not produce coins; all coinage is produced by the United States Mint. With production facilities in Washington, D.C., and Fort Worth, Texas, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing is the largest producer of government security documents in the United States.

United States Department of the Treasury United States federal executive department

The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government. Established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue, the Treasury prints all paper currency and mints all coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint, respectively; collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service; manages U.S. government debt instruments; licenses and supervises banks and thrift institutions; and advises the legislative and executive branches on matters of fiscal policy.

Contents

The position has existed since 1862, when the United States Congress authorized the Treasury Department to begin printing paper money. Until the 1890s, the office was commonly known as Chief of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

United States Congress Legislature of the United States

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States, and consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate. The Congress meets in the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. Both senators and representatives are chosen through direct election, though vacancies in the Senate may be filled by a gubernatorial appointment. Congress has 535 voting members: 435 representatives and 100 senators. The House of Representatives has six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in addition to its 435 voting members. Although they cannot vote in the full house, these members can address the house, sit and vote in congressional committees, and introduce legislation.

The Director operates with general directions provided by the United States Secretary of the Treasury.

United States Secretary of the Treasury Government position

The secretary of the treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury which is concerned with all financial and monetary matters relating to the federal government, and, until 2003, also included several major federal law enforcement agencies. This position in the federal government of the United States is analogous to the minister of finance in many other countries. The secretary of the treasury is a member of the president's Cabinet, and is nominated by the president of the United States. Nominees for secretary of the treasury undergo a confirmation hearing before the United States Senate Committee on Finance before being voted on by the United States Senate.

List of Directors of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing [1]

NameAssumed OfficeLeft Office President Appointed By
Spencer M. Clark 18621868 Abraham Lincoln
George B. McCartee 18691876 Ulysses S. Grant
Henry C. Jewell 18761877 Ulysses S. Grant
Edward McPherson 18771878 Rutherford B. Hayes
O. H. Irish 18781883 Rutherford B. Hayes
Truman N. Burrill 18831885 Chester A. Arthur
Edward O. Graves 18851889 Grover Cleveland
William Morton Meredith 18891893 Benjamin Harrison
Claude M. Johnson 18931900 Grover Cleveland
William Morton Meredith 19001906 William McKinley
Thomas J. Sullivan 19061908 Theodore Roosevelt
Joseph E. Ralph 19081917 Theodore Roosevelt
James L. Wilmeth 19171922 Woodrow Wilson
Louis A. Hill 19221924 Warren G. Harding
Wallace W. Kirby 19241924 Calvin Coolidge
Alvin W. Hall 19241954 Calvin Coolidge
Henry J. Holtzclaw 19541967 Dwight D. Eisenhower
James A. Conlon 19671977 Lyndon B. Johnson
Seymour Berry 19771979 Jimmy Carter
Harry R. Clements 19791982 Jimmy Carter
Robert J. Leuver 19831988 Ronald Reagan
Peter H. Daly 19881995 Ronald Reagan
Larry E. Rolufs 19951997 Bill Clinton
Thomas A. Ferguson 19982006 Bill Clinton
Larry R. Felix 20062015 George W. Bush
Leonard R. Olijar 2015Present Barack Obama

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Spencer M. Clark American government official

Spencer M. Clark was the first Superintendent of the National Currency Bureau, today known as the Bureau of Printing and Engraving, from 1862 to 1868.

Larry R. Felix American government official

Larry R. Felix was the Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) within the United States Department of the Treasury from 2006 to 2015.

Thomas A. Ferguson American government official

Thomas A. Ferguson was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1998 to 2005.

Larry E. Rolufs American government official

Larry E. Rolufs was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1995 to 1997.

Peter H. Daly American government official

Peter H. Daly was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1988 to 1995.

Robert J. Leuver American government official

Robert J. Leuver was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1983 to 1988.

James A. Conlon American government official

James A. Conlon was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1967 to 1977.

Henry J. Holtzclaw American government official

Henry J. Holtzclaw was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1954 to 1967.

Alvin W. Hall American government official

Alvin W. Hall was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1924 to 1954.

Louis A. Hill American government official

Louis A. Hill (1865–1933) was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1922 to 1924.

James L. Wilmeth American treasury official

James L. Wilmeth (1870–1959) was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1917 to 1922.

Joseph E. Ralph American treasury official

Joseph E. Ralph (1863–1922) was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1908 to 1917.

Thomas J. Sullivan US Treasury official

Thomas J. Sullivan (1845–1908) was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1906 to 1908.

William Morton Meredith American journalist

William Morton Meredith (1835–1917) was an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing from 1889 to 1893 and from 1900 to 1906.

References

  1. Directors from BEP website