Edward III's chevauchée of 1355

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Edward III's chevauchée of 1355
Part of the Hundred Years' War
Date2 – 11 November 1355
Location
Picardy, France
Result Inconclusive
Belligerents
Royal Arms of England (1340-1367).svg Kingdom of England Arms of the Kings of France (France Ancien).svg Kingdom of France
Commanders and leaders
Royal Arms of England (1340-1367).svg King Edward III Arms of the Kings of France (France Ancien).svg King John II of France
Strength
9,000–10,000 Unknown

Edward III's chevauchée of 1355 took place when King Edward III of England led an army into Picardy in the hope of provoking the French into a battle. Edward's son The Black Prince had begun a chevauchée on 5 October with an Anglo-Gascon force from Bordeaux heading towards Narbonne.

Campaign

On 2 November 1355 King Edward III of England led an army [1] of 9,000–10,000 men [2] from the English enclave of Calais into French-held Picardy. He hoped to draw the larger French army, under the French king, John II, into a battle. [3] John declined, ordering a scorched earth policy [4] and harassing the English communications. [1] After reaching Hesdin Edward returned to Calais on 11 November. [5]


Citations and sources

Citations

  1. 1 2 Rogers 2014, p. 297.
  2. Rogers 2014, pp. 295 n. 44.
  3. Rogers 2014, pp. 297, 299.
  4. Sumption 1999, pp. 172–173.
  5. Sumption 1999, p. 173.

Sources

  • Rogers, Clifford (2014) [2000]. War Cruel and Sharp: English Strategy under Edward III, 1327–1360. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell Press. ISBN   978-0851158044.
  • Sumption, Jonathan (1999). Trial by Fire. The Hundred Years' War. II. London: Faber and Faber. ISBN   978-0571138968.

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