Tournaisis campaign of 1340

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Tournaisis campaign of 1340
Tournai Campaign
Part of the Hundred Years' War
Location
Northern France & Flanders
Result English withdrawal
Belligerents
Royal Arms of England (1340-1367).svg Kingdom of England Blason pays fr FranceAncien.svg Kingdom of France
Commanders and leaders
Royal Arms of England (1340-1367).svg King Edward III Blason pays fr FranceAncien.svg King Philip VI

The Tournaisis campaign of 1340, also known as the Tournai Campaign was a military campaign of King Edward III of England during the Hundred Years War. The English army was supported by Flemish, Hainault, Brabant and Holy Roman Empire forces. The campaign resulted in the defeat of an Anglo-Flemish force, carrying out a small scale chevauchée in the County of Artois, at the Battle of Saint-Omer, an unsuccessful siege of Tournai and ended with meeting of the English and French armies at Bouvines without battle. The campaign ended with the Truce of Espléchin and the withdrawal of the English led forces. The English army was led by King Edward III, and the French by King Philip VI of France.

Aftermath

The truce was broken in 1341, when conflict erupted between English and French forces over the succession to the Duchy of Brittany. Edward III, backed John de Montfort, and Philip VI, backed Charles of Blois.

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