Ford C. Frick Award

Last updated
Ford C. Frick, the award's namesake Ford Frick at 1937 All-Star Game (cropped and adjusted).jpg
Ford C. Frick, the award's namesake

The Ford C. Frick Award is presented annually by the National Baseball Hall of Fame in the United States to a broadcaster for "major contributions to baseball". It is named for Ford C. Frick, former Commissioner of Major League Baseball. Before his career as an executive, Frick was a baseball writer; he gained fame as the ghostwriter for Babe Ruth in the 1920s. The award was created in 1978, and named in tribute to Frick following his death that year.

Contents

Though they are sometimes erroneously referred to as "Hall of Famers", honorees are not inducted into the Hall of Fame. [1] Honorees (if living) give a speech at the Hall of Fame during induction weekend, and their names are added to a plaque in the Hall's library. For several years in the early 2000s, Frick Award honorees also became life members of the Veterans Committee, which considers candidates for Hall of Fame induction who are not eligible for the regular voting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America specifically, players no longer on the BBWAA ballot and all non-players. However, starting with the 2008 elections, voting for players on the main Veterans Committee ballot was restricted to Hall of Fame members. After further changes announced for the 2011 elections, Frick Award winners are eligible to serve on the voting bodies that replaced the Veterans Committee (currently four) that consider candidates from different eras of baseball.

From 2004 to 2016, fans were allowed to vote for three of the award's ten annual nominees; in the final years of fan voting, it was conducted on the Hall's Facebook page. Through 2013, seven candidates were selected by a committee consisting of previous Frick Award winners and broadcast historians and columnists, which also determined the final recipient. Beginning with the 2014 award, the final election committee no longer selects any of the finalists; that role is now handled by a Hall of Fame research committee. [2]

Other changes in the selection process were also announced for the 2014 award; these changes were similar to those instituted in 2010 for Veterans Committee balloting. From 2014 to 2016, candidates were considered every third year, based on the era in which they made their most significant contributions: [2]

More recently, the Hall announced further changes to the selection process in 2016 that took effect immediately, with the first award affected by these changes being that for 2017. Fan voting was eliminated, and the final ballot was cut from 10 to 8. Candidates are still considered every third year, but now in mostly different categories: [3]

Recipients

YearHonoreePrimary affiliation(s)
1978 Mel Allen New York Yankees
1978 Red Barber Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Yankees
1979 Bob Elson Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, Mutual
1980 Russ Hodges New York/San Francisco Giants
1981 Ernie Harwell Detroit Tigers
1982 Vin Scully Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, NBC, CBS Radio
1983 Jack Brickhouse Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox
1984 Curt Gowdy Boston Red Sox, NBC
1985 Buck Canel New York Yankees, New York Mets
1986 Bob Prince Pittsburgh Pirates
1987 Jack Buck St. Louis Cardinals, CBS
1988 Lindsey Nelson New York Mets
1989 Harry Caray St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago White Sox, Chicago Cubs
1990 By Saam Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Athletics
1991 Joe Garagiola NBC
1992 Milo Hamilton Houston Astros
1993 Chuck Thompson Baltimore Orioles
1994 Bob Murphy New York Mets
1995 Bob Wolff Washington Senators, NBC
1996 Herb Carneal Minnesota Twins
1997 Jimmy Dudley Cleveland Indians
1998 Jaime Jarrín Los Angeles Dodgers
1999 Arch McDonald Washington Senators
2000 Marty Brennaman Cincinnati Reds
2001 Felo Ramírez Florida Marlins
2002 Harry Kalas Philadelphia Phillies
2003 Bob Uecker Milwaukee Brewers
2004 Lon Simmons San Francisco Giants, Oakland Athletics
2005 Jerry Coleman San Diego Padres
2006 Gene Elston Houston Astros, CBS Radio
2007 Denny Matthews Kansas City Royals
2008 Dave Niehaus Seattle Mariners
2009 Tony Kubek Toronto Blue Jays, New York Yankees, NBC
2010 Jon Miller Baltimore Orioles, San Francisco Giants, ESPN
2011 Dave Van Horne Montreal Expos, Florida Marlins
2012 Tim McCarver New York Mets, ABC, CBS, Fox
2013 Tom Cheek Toronto Blue Jays
2014 Eric Nadel Texas Rangers
2015 Dick Enberg California Angels, San Diego Padres, NBC
2016 Graham McNamee NBC Radio
2017 Bill King Oakland Athletics
2018 Bob Costas NBC, MLB Network
2019 Al Helfer Brooklyn Dodgers, Mutual
2020 Ken Harrelson Chicago White Sox
2021 Al Michaels Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, ABC

See also

Related Research Articles

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum Professional sports hall of fame in New York, U.S.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is a history museum and hall of fame in Cooperstown, New York, operated by private interests. It serves as the central point of the history of baseball in the United States and displays baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, honoring those who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations". Cooperstown is often used as shorthand for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, similar to "Canton" for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

Veterans Committee

The Veterans Committee is the popular name of various committees of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum that elect participants other than recently retired players.

2005 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2005 proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from recent players, voting Ryne Sandberg and Wade Boggs into the Hall. The Veterans Committee held a separate election to select from players retired more than 20 years, but did not elect anyone.

2004 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2004 proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from recent players; Dennis Eckersley and Paul Molitor gained induction to the Hall.

2006 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2006 proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001, augmented by a special election; the result was the largest class of inductees (18) in the Hall's history, including the first woman elected, Effa Manley.

2002 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2002 proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from among recent players; Ozzie Smith was elected.

2001 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2001 followed the system in use since 1995. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected two: Kirby Puckett and Dave Winfield. The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions and selected two people from multiple classified ballots: Bill Mazeroski and Hilton Smith.

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2000 followed the system in use since 1995. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected two: Carlton Fisk and Tony Pérez. The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions and selected three people from multiple classified ballots: Sparky Anderson, Bid McPhee, and Turkey Stearnes.

2007 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2007 proceeded according to revised rules enacted in 2001. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from among recent players, resulting in the induction of Tony Gwynn and Cal Ripken Jr.

2010 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2010 proceeded according to rules enacted in 2001 and revised in 2007. As always, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recent players; one player was elected, Andre Dawson.

2011 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for 2011 proceeded according to the rules revised in July 2010. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players. The new Expansion Era Committee, which replaced the Veterans Committee, convened in December 2010 to select from an Expansion Era ballot of long-retired players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport from 1973 to the present time, called the "Expansion Era" by the Hall of Fame.

2012 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2012 proceeded according to rules most recently revised in July 2010. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 9, 2012. The Golden Era Committee, the second of three new era committees established by the July 2010 rules change, replacing the Veterans Committee, convened early in December 2011 to select from a Golden Era ballot of retired players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport between 1947 and 1972, called the "Golden Era" by the Hall of Fame.

2013 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2013 took place according to rules most recently revised in July 2010. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 9, 2013. The Pre-Integration Committee, the last of three new voting committees established during the July 2010 rules change to replace the more broadly defined Veterans Committee, convened early in December 2012 to select from a ballot of players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport prior to 1947, called the "Pre-Integration Era" by the Hall of Fame.

2014 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2014 proceeded according to rules most recently revised in July 2010. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 8, 2014. The Expansion Era Committee, one of three voting panels that replaced the more broadly defined Veterans Committee following the July 2010 rules change, convened early in December 2013 to select from a ballot of retired players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport after 1972, a time frame that the Hall of Fame calls the "Expansion Era".

2015 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2015 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2014. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 6, 2015. Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez, John Smoltz and Craig Biggio were elected to the Hall of Fame. It was the first time since 1955 that the BBWAA elected four players in one year.

2016 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2016 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2015. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 6, 2016; Ken Griffey Jr. and Mike Piazza were elected to the Hall of Fame.

2017 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2017 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2016. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 18, 2017. The BBWAA elected Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, and Iván Rodríguez to the Hall of Fame.

2018 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for 2018 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2016. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players. The results were announced on January 24, 2018, with the BBWAA electing Chipper Jones, Vladimir Guerrero, Jim Thome and Trevor Hoffman to the Hall of Fame. Jones and Thome were elected in their first year of eligibility.

2019 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for 2019 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2016. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players. The results were announced on January 22, 2019, with the BBWAA electing Mariano Rivera, Roy Halladay, Edgar Martínez and Mike Mussina to the Hall of Fame. Rivera and Halladay were elected in their first year of eligibility, while Martínez was elected in his last year of eligibility. Rivera became the first player to be unanimously elected, appearing on all 425 ballots; he broke Ken Griffey Jr.'s record of 99.32 percent, set in 2016.

2020 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the National Baseball Hall of Fame for 2020 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2016. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players. The results were announced on January 21, 2020, with Derek Jeter and Larry Walker elected to the Hall of Fame.

References

General

Specific

  1. "National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum: Hall of Famers FAQ". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Archived from the original on April 16, 2009.
  2. 1 2 "Baseball Hall of Fame Restructures Frick Award Selection Process" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. September 4, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013.
  3. "Hall of Fame Makes Series of Announcements" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. July 23, 2016. Retrieved August 14, 2016.