Francis Talbot, 5th Earl of Shrewsbury

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Arms of Sir Francis Talbot, 5th Earl of Shrewsbury, KG. Coat of arms of Sir Francis Talbot, 5th Earl of Shrewsbury, KG.png
Arms of Sir Francis Talbot, 5th Earl of Shrewsbury, KG.

Sir Francis Talbot, 5th Earl of Shrewsbury, 5th Earl of Waterford, 11th Baron Talbot, KG (1500 – 25 September 1560) was the son of George Talbot, 4th Earl of Shrewsbury, and Anne Hastings. He also held the subsidiary titles of 14th Baron Strange of Blackmere and 10th Baron Furnivall.

Contents

Life

His maternal grandparents were William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, and Katherine Neville. Katherine was a daughter of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, and Alice Neville, 5th Countess of Salisbury.

He succeeded his father in 1538, taking over his father's position as Chamberlain of the Exchequer for life.

Though a Roman Catholic, he retained the royal favour during the reign of Henry VIII, and received some lands from the dissolution of the monasteries, including those belonging to Worksop Priory. While he took little part in national politics, he was a powerful figure in the North of the kingdom. He took part in the invasion of Scotland which culminated in the Battle of Pinkie (1547), and was made President of the Council of the North in 1549. Under Edward VI he conformed to the reformed religion but it was no secret that his sympathies were with the Catholic faith. Although not normally active in national politics he was a member of the King's Council; some of his fellow Councillors are said to have feared that he might raise the West in favour of Mary. [1] While he did not oppose the proclamation of Lady Jane Grey as Queen, he almost certainly worked to persuade the Council to recognise Mary I and was one of the first to openly voice support for her. [2] Mary rewarded him with a place on her Council.[ citation needed ]

He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1545.

He married Mary Dacre (1502–1538), daughter of Thomas Dacre, 2nd Baron Dacre, on 30 November 1523. They had three children:

He married a second time to Grace Shakerley (d. 1560), daughter of Robert Shakerley. They had one son, Sir John Talbot, born in 1541 in Grafton, Worcester, England

Notes

  1. Prescott, H.F.M. Mary Tudor-the Spanish Tudor Eyre and Spottiswoode 1952
  2. Prescott. Mary Tudor

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References

Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Shrewsbury
Lord High Steward of Ireland
1538–1560
Succeeded by
The Earl of Shrewsbury
Legal offices
Preceded by
Sir Anthony Browne
Justice in Eyre
north of the Trent

1548–1560
Succeeded by
The Earl of Shrewsbury
Peerage of England
Preceded by
George Talbot
Earl of Shrewsbury
1538–1560
Succeeded by
George Talbot
Baron Talbot
(descended by acceleration)

1538–1560
Baron Strange of Blackmere
1538–1560
Baron Furnivall
1538–1560
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
George Talbot
Earl of Waterford
1538–1533
Succeeded by
George Talbot