Fred Wooller

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Fred Wooller
Personal information
Full name Fred Wooller
Date of birth (1938-10-21) 21 October 1938 (age 83)
Original team(s) Bacchus Marsh (BFL)
Height 187 cm (6 ft 2 in)
Weight 85 kg (187 lb)
Playing career1
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1956–1964 Geelong 132 (225)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1964.
Career highlights
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Fred Wooller (born 21 October 1938) is a former Australian rules footballer who played with Geelong in the VFL.

Contents

Football

Recruited from Bacchus Marsh, [1] Wooller started his career as a full forward and topped Geelong's goalkicking with 56 goals in 1957, his tally being the equal second highest in the league for that season. He was rewarded with selection in the interstate carnival where he represented Victoria.

He was the Geelong's leading goalkicker again in 1959 as well as in 1960, where he played at centre half forward and won the Carji Greeves Medal for the club's best and fairest.

On 6 July 1963 he was a member of the Geelong team that were comprehensively and unexpectedly beaten by Fitzroy, 9.13 (67) to 3.13 (31) in the 1963 Miracle Match.

In 1963 he became club captain and led his side into the grand final. He kicked 3 goals and helped Geelong win their 6th premiership.

See also

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References

  1. "Round 1 - Western Bulldogs vs. Geelong". AFL Premiership Players Club. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 25 September 2007.