Carji Greeves Medal

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The Carji Greeves Medal is a name given in recent decades to an Australian rules football award given to the player(s) adjudged best and fairest for the Geelong Football Club for the season. The voting system as of the 2017 AFL season, consists of the senior coach, director of coaching and the assistant coaches rating each player out of 15 after every game. The combined votes are averaged to give a final score for that game. To ensure players are not disadvantaged by injury, only a player's highest scoring 21 games count. [1]

Contents

Edward 'Carji' Greeves was a champion Geelong footballer who won the inaugural Brownlow Medal in 1924, for the best and fairest player in the Victorian Football League.

Recipients

^Denotes current player
+Player won Brownlow Medal in same season
Table of recipients, with runner ups and votes
SeasonRecipientVotesRunner upVotesRef.
1897 Joe McShane [2]
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903 Teddy Rankin
1904
1905 Henry Young [3]
1906 Henry Young (2) [3]
1907
1908
1909
1910 Dick Grigg [4]
1911 Dick Grigg (2) [4]
1912 Dick Grigg (3) [4]
1913
1914 Dick Grigg (4) [4]
1915 Alec Eason
1916 None [a]
1917 Bert Rankin
1918
1919
1920 Jockie Jones
1921 Billy McCarter
1922 Keith Johns [5]
1923 Billy McCarter (2)
1924
1925
1926
1927 George Todd [6]
1928 Reg Hickey [7]
1929
1930 George Todd (2) [6]
1931 George Todd (3) [6]
1932 George Moloney
1933 [b] Les Hardiman Jack J. Walker [8]
1934 Reg Hickey (2) [7]
1935 Fred Hawking Reg Hickey [9]
1936 Tom Quinn Reg Hickey [10]
1937 Tom Quinn (2) Les Hardiman [11]
1938 Tom Arklay
1939 Jack Grant Angie Muller [12]
Leo Dean
1940 Tom Arklay (2) Jack Butcher [13]
1941 Jim Knight [14]
1942 None [c]
1943 None [c]
1944 Jim Munday [15] [16]
1945 Jim Fitzgerald Ralph Patman [17]
1946 Geoff Mahon Fred Flanagan [18] [19]
1947 Lindsay White Don Bauer [20]
1948 Bruce Morrison Bernie Smith [21] [22]
1949 Fred Flanagan Bernie Smith [23]
1950 John Hyde Bruce Morrison [24] [21]
1951 Bernie Smith + Neil Trezise [22] [25]
1952 Geoff Williams Peter Pianto [26]
1953 Peter Pianto John Hyde [27]
1954 Norm Sharp Peter Pianto [28]
1955 Geoff Williams (2) John O'Neill [29]
1956 Bernie Smith (2) Peter Pianto [22] [30]
1957 Bob Davis Peter Pianto [31] [30]
1958 John O'Neill
1959 Colin Rice
1960 Fred Wooller [32]
1961 Roy West Bill Goggin [33]
1962 Alistair Lord + Bill Goggin [33] [34]
1963 Graham Farmer Peter Walker [35] [36]
1964 Graham Farmer (2) Bill Goggin [33] [36]
1965 Peter Walker [35]
1966 Denis Marshall Graham Farmer [36] [37]
1967 Bill Goggin Graham Farmer [33] [36]
1968 John Newman Bill Goggin [33] [37] [38]
Denis Marshall
1969 Doug Wade
1970 Bill Goggin (2) [33]
1971 David Clarke Bill Goggin [33] [39]
1972 Ian Nankervis [40]
1973 Bruce Nankervis
1974 Bruce Nankervis (2) John Newman [38]
1975 John Newman (2) [38]
1976 Ian Nankervis (2) [40]
1977 Ian Nankervis (3) [40]
1978 David Clarke (2) [39]
1979 David Clarke (3) Ian Nankervis [39] [40]
1980 Rod Blake Michael Turner [41] [42]
1981 Peter Featherby Ian Nankervis [43] [40]
1982 John Mossop Michael Turner [42] [44]
1983 Ray Card [45]
1984 Gary Ablett Sr. [46]
1985 Greg Williams Gary Ablett Sr. [46]
1986 Paul Couch [46]
1987 Mark Bos [47]
1988 Mark Bos (2) [47]
1989 Paul Couch + (2) Barry Stoneham [46]
1990 Barry Stoneham Garry Hocking [46]
1991 Garry Hocking [46]
1992 Ken Hinkley Tim McGrath [46]
1993 Garry Hocking (2) Gary Ablett Sr. [46]
1994 Garry Hocking (3) Gary Ablett Sr. [46]
1995 Paul Couch (3) Gary Ablett Sr. [46]
1996 Garry Hocking (4)149 Brad Sholl 118 [46]
1997 Liam Pickering 145 Glenn Kilpatrick 137 [48]
1998 Peter Riccardi Garry Hocking [49]
1999 Ben Graham 118 Peter Riccardi 112 [49]
2000 Steven King
2001 Brenton Sanderson 443 Matthew Scarlett 427 [50]
2002 Steven King (2)527 Cameron Ling 472 [50]
2003 Matthew Scarlett 560 Cameron Ling 431 [51]
2004 Cameron Ling 597 Matthew Scarlett 549 [52]
2005 Joel Corey 509 Matthew Scarlett 465 [53]
2006 Paul Chapman 462 Jimmy Bartel 383 [54]
2007 Gary Ablett Jr. ^691 Jimmy Bartel 513 [55]
2008 Joel Corey (2)591 Gary Ablett Jr. ^538 [56]
2009 Gary Ablett Jr. +^ (2)740 Jimmy Bartel 629 [57]
Corey Enright
2010 Joel Selwood ^667 Gary Ablett Jr. ^647 [58]
2011 Corey Enright (2)150 Joel Corey 143 [59]
2012 Tom Hawkins ^1394 Joel Selwood ^1388 [60]
2013 Joel Selwood ^ (2)323 Harry Taylor ^311 [61]
2014 Joel Selwood ^ (3)304 Tom Hawkins ^294 [62]
2015 Mark Blicavs ^177 Steven Motlop 167 [63]
2016 Patrick Dangerfield +^253 Joel Selwood ^238 [64]
2017 Patrick Dangerfield ^ (2)240 Mitch Duncan ^225.5 [65]
2018 Mark Blicavs ^ (2)234 Patrick Dangerfield ^233.5 [66]
Tim Kelly
2019 Patrick Dangerfield ^ (3)268 Tim Kelly 259.5 [67]
2020 Cameron Guthrie ^228 Tom Hawkins ^224 [68]

Multiple winners

^Denotes current player
PlayerMedalsSeasons
Dick Grigg 41910, 1911, 1912, 1914
Garry Hocking 41991, 1993, 1994, 1996
David Clarke 31971, 1978, 1979
Paul Couch 31986, 1989, 1995
Patrick Dangerfield ^32016, 2017, 2019
Ian Nankervis 31972, 1976, 1977
Joel Selwood ^32010, 2013, 2014
George Todd 31927, 1930, 1931
Gary Ablett, Jr. 22007, 2009
Tom Arklay 21938, 1940
Mark Bos 21987, 1988
Mark Blicavs ^22015, 2018
Joel Corey 22005, 2008
Corey Enright 22009, 2011
Graham Farmer 21963, 1964
Bill Goggin 21967, 1970
Reg Hickey 21928, 1934
Steven King 22000, 2002
Billy McCarter 21921, 1923
Bruce Nankervis 21973, 1974
John Newman 21968, 1975
Tom Quinn 21936, 1937
Bernie Smith 21951, 1956
Geoff Williams 21952, 1955
Henry Young 21905, 1906

Notes

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