John Worsfold Medal

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The John Worsfold Medal is an Australian rules football award presented annually to the player(s) adjudged the best and fairest at the West Coast Eagles throughout the Victorian Football League/Australian Football League (VFL/AFL) season.

Contents

Sixteen individual players have won the West Coast best and fairest since the award was introduced for West Coast's inaugural 1987 season. The record of the most Club Champion Awards by an individual player is four which is held by Glen Jakovich and Ben Cousins. Both players also share the record for the most consecutive best and fairests, having both won three consecutive awards.

The Club Champion Award was renamed the John Worsfold Medal in 2013, [1] after former premiership-winning captain and coach John Worsfold.

Voting procedure

Various procedures have been used by the match committee to determine the club champion:

Recipients

John Worsfold, the namesake of the award, won in 1988. John Worsfold.jpg
John Worsfold, the namesake of the award, won in 1988.
Guy McKenna won in 1989 and 1999. Guy McKenna.jpg
Guy McKenna won in 1989 and 1999.
Chris Judd won the 2004 Brownlow Medal in the same year he won the John Worsfold Medal. Chris Judd.jpg
Chris Judd won the 2004 Brownlow Medal in the same year he won the John Worsfold Medal.
Mark LeCras won in 2010. Mark LeCras 2018.2.jpg
Mark LeCras won in 2010.
^Denotes current player
+Player won Brownlow Medal in same season
YearWinner(s)VotesRunner(s) upVotesThird placeVotesRef.
1987 Steve Malaxos 229 Ross Glendinning 170 Chris Mainwaring 166 [3]
1988 John Worsfold 111 Guy McKenna 101 Chris Mainwaring 74 [4]
1989 Guy McKenna 36 Chris Mainwaring 30 Chris Lewis 26 [5]
1990 Chris Lewis 39 Michael Brennan 36N/A [6]
Dwayne Lamb
1991 Craig Turley 43 Guy McKenna 42 Peter Matera 41 [3]
1992 Dean Kemp 46 Chris Mainwaring 38 Glen Jakovich 37 [7]
1993 Glen Jakovich 34 Peter Matera 31N/A [8] [9]
Don Pyke Peter Wilson
1994 Glen Jakovich (2)45 Don Pyke 39 Guy McKenna 38 [8]
1995 Glen Jakovich (3)36 Dean Kemp 33N/A [8]
Mitchell White
1996 Drew Banfield 36 Chris Mainwaring 35 Guy McKenna 34 [10]
1997 Peter Matera 37 Dean Kemp 35 Chad Morrison 33 [11]
Paul Symmons
1998 Ashley McIntosh 39 Ben Cousins 37 Fraser Gehrig 30 [12]
Chris Waterman
1999 Guy McKenna (2)36 Drew Banfield 35N/A [5]
Michael Braun
Ben Cousins
2000 Glen Jakovich (4)27 Dean Kemp 23 Chad Morrison 21 [8]
2001 Ben Cousins 30 Michael Collica 17 Chad Fletcher 16 [13]
Rowan Jones
2002 Ben Cousins (2)341 Daniel Kerr 295 Chris Judd 242 [14]
2003 Ben Cousins (3)303 Chris Judd 269 Chad Fletcher 257 [13]
2004 Chris Judd +355 Chad Fletcher 319 Dean Cox 271 [15]
2005 Ben Cousins + (4)477 Chris Judd 416 Dean Cox 411 [16]
2006 Chris Judd (2)452 Darren Glass 440 Ben Cousins 429 [15]
2007 Darren Glass 405 Adam Hunter 369 Adam Selwood 367 [17]
2008 Dean Cox 450 Quinten Lynch 360 Adam Selwood 316 [18]
2009 Darren Glass (2)340 Shannon Hurn ^329 Mark LeCras 328 [19]
2010 Mark LeCras 294 Matt Priddis 286 Beau Waters 281 [20]
2011 Darren Glass (3)398 Matt Priddis 398 Dean Cox 397 [21]
2012 Scott Selwood 403 Dean Cox 400 Shannon Hurn ^396 [22]
2013 Matt Priddis 373 Eric Mackenzie 363 Josh Kennedy ^363 [23]
2014 Eric Mackenzie 201 Matt Priddis +190 Luke Shuey ^148 [24]
2015 Andrew Gaff ^210 Matt Priddis 206 Josh Kennedy ^183 [25]
2016 Luke Shuey ^157 Josh Kennedy ^146 Andrew Gaff ^140 [26]
2017 Elliot Yeo ^197 Jeremy McGovern ^191 Luke Shuey ^180 [27]
2018 Elliot Yeo ^ (2)273 Jack Redden ^231 Shannon Hurn ^222 [28]
2019 Luke Shuey ^ (2)258 Elliot Yeo ^239 Brad Sheppard ^234 [29]
2020 Nic Naitanui ^194 Andrew Gaff ^192 Brad Sheppard ^163 [30]

Multiple winners

Elliot Yeo is one of seven players to have won multiple times. Elliot Yeo 2018.2.jpg
Elliot Yeo is one of seven players to have won multiple times.
^Denotes current player
PlayerMedalsSeasons
Ben Cousins 42001, 2002, 2003, 2005
Glen Jakovich 41993, 1994, 1995, 2000
Darren Glass 32007, 2009, 2011
Chris Judd 22004, 2006
Guy McKenna 21989, 1999
Luke Shuey ^22016, 2019
Elliot Yeo ^22017, 2018

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References

General
Specific
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