Herald Sun

Last updated

Herald Sun
Herald Sun front page 12-12-2005.jpg
Herald Sun front page 12 December 2005, reporting on the 2005 Cronulla riots
TypeDaily newspaper
Format Tabloid
Owner(s) The Herald and Weekly Times (News Corp Australia)
EditorDamon Johnston
FoundedThe Port Phillip Herald (3 January 1840)
The Melbourne Morning Herald (1 January 1849)
The Melbourne Herald (1 January 1855)
The Herald (8 September 1855)
The Sun News-Pictorial (11 September 1922)
The Herald Sun (8 October 1990)
HeadquartersThe Herald and Weekly Times Tower, 40 City Road,
Southbank, Victoria, Australia
Website Official website (Note: Some services may only be available via pre-billed subscription [1]

The Herald Sun is a morning newspaper based in Melbourne, Australia, published by The Herald and Weekly Times, a subsidiary of News Corp Australia, itself a subsidiary of News Corp. The Herald Sun primarily serves Victoria and shares many articles with other News Corporation daily newspapers, especially those from Australia.

Melbourne City in Victoria, Australia

Melbourne is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Its name refers to an urban agglomeration of 9,992.5 km2 (3,858.1 sq mi), comprising a metropolitan area with 31 municipalities, and is also the common name for its city centre. The city occupies much of the coastline of Port Phillip bay and spreads into the hinterlands towards the Dandenong and Macedon ranges, Mornington Peninsula and Yarra Valley. It has a population of 5 million, and its inhabitants are referred to as "Melburnians".

The Herald and Weekly Times Australian newspaper publisher

The Herald and Weekly Times Limited (HWT) is a newspaper publishing company based in Melbourne, Australia. It is owned and operated by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp Australia, which purchased HWT in 1987.

News Corp Australia is one of Australia's largest media conglomerates, employing more than 8,000 staff nationwide and approximately 3,000 journalists. The group's interests span newspaper and magazine publishing, Internet, subscription television, market research, DVD and film distribution, and film and television production trading assets. News Pty Limited is the holding company of the group.

Contents

It is also available for purchase in Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory and border regions of South Australia and southern New South Wales such as the Riverina and NSW South Coast, and is available digitally through its website and apps. In 2017, the paper had a daily circulation of 350,000 from Monday to Friday. [2]

Tasmania island state of Australia

Tasmania is an island state of Australia. It is located 240 km (150 mi) to the south of the Australian mainland, separated by Bass Strait. The state encompasses the main island of Tasmania, the 26th-largest island in the world, and the surrounding 334 islands. The state has a population of around 531,500 as of December 2018. Just over forty percent of the population resides in the Greater Hobart precinct, which forms the metropolitan area of the state capital and largest city, Hobart.

Australian Capital Territory Federal territory of Australia, containing the capital city, Canberra

The Australian Capital Territory, formerly known as the Federal Capital Territory until 1938 and commonly referred to as the ACT, is a federal territory of Australia containing the Australian capital city of Canberra and some surrounding townships. It is located in the south-east of the country and is an enclave within the state of New South Wales. Founded after federation as the seat of government for the new nation, all important institutions of the Australian federal government are centred in the Territory.

South Australia State of Australia

South Australia is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It covers some of the most arid parts of the country. With a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth-largest of Australia's states and territories by area, and fifth largest by population. It has a total of 1.7 million people, and its population is the second most highly centralised in Australia, after Western Australia, with more than 77 percent of South Australians living in the capital, Adelaide, or its environs. Other population centres in the state are relatively small; Mount Gambier, the second largest centre, has a population of 28,684.

Origins

The Herald Sun newspaper is the product of a merger in 1990 of two newspapers owned by The Herald and Weekly Times Limited: the morning tabloid paper The Sun News-Pictorial and the afternoon broadsheet paper The Herald . It was first published on 8 October 1990 as the Herald-Sun. The hyphen in its title was dropped after 1 May 1993 as part of an effort to drop the overt reminder of the paper's two predecessors that the hyphen implied and also by the fact that by 1993 most of the columns and features inherited from The Herald and The Sun News-Pictorial had either been discontinued or subsumed completely in new sections. [3]

Mergers and acquisitions transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations or their operating units are transferred or combined

Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) are transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations, or their operating units are transferred or consolidated with other entities. As an aspect of strategic management, M&A can allow enterprises to grow or downsize, and change the nature of their business or competitive position.

Tabloid (newspaper format) Type of newspaper format

A tabloid is a newspaper with a compact page size smaller than broadsheet. There is no standard size for this newspaper format.

The Sun News-Pictorial, also known as The Sun, was a morning daily tabloid newspaper published in Melbourne, from 1922 until its merger in 1990 with The Herald to form the Herald-Sun.

History

The Herald

The old Herald and Weekly Times building in Flinders Street. Herald and Weekly Times Building - 2004.jpg
The old Herald and Weekly Times building in Flinders Street.
The Melbourne Arts Centre Spire viewed from behind the rooftop signage for the Herald and Weekly Times building. Behind the sun.jpg
The Melbourne Arts Centre Spire viewed from behind the rooftop signage for the Herald and Weekly Times building.

The Herald was founded on 3 January 1840 by George Cavenagh as the Port Phillip Herald. In 1849, it became TheMelbourne Morning Herald. At the beginning of 1855, it became TheMelbourne Herald before settling on The Herald from 8 September 1855 - the name it would hold for the next 135 years. From 1869, it was an evening newspaper. Colonel William Thomas Reay was sometime literary editor and later associate editor, before becoming managing editor in 1904. When The Argus newspaper closed in 1957, The Herald and Weekly Times bought out and continued various Argus media assets. [4] In 1986, The Herald's Saturday edition - The Weekend Herald - which had adopted a tabloid format, in order to distinguish it from the Monday to Friday editions' broadsheet format - was closed.

Colonel William Thomas Reay CBE VD was an Australian journalist, newspaper editor and politician, as well as a police and army officer.

<i>The Argus</i> (Melbourne) former newspaper in Melbourne

The Argus was a morning daily newspaper in Melbourne, Australia that was established in 1846 and closed in 1957. It was considered to be the general Australian newspaper of record for this period. Widely known as a conservative newspaper for most of its history, it adopted a left-leaning approach from 1949. The Argus's main competitor was David Syme's more liberal-minded newspaper, The Age.

A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages.

The Sun News-Pictorial

The Sun News-Pictorial was founded on 11 September 1922, and bought by The Herald and Weekly Times in 1925.

1990 merger to form the Herald Sun

In its prime, The Herald had a circulation of almost 600,000, but by the time of its 150th anniversary in 1990, with the impact of evening television news and a higher proportion of people using cars to get home from work rather than public transport, The Herald's circulation had fallen below 200,000. This was much less than that of the morning Sun.

With the only alternative option being to close The Herald, The Herald and Weekly Times decided to merge the two newspapers, and so after one hundred and fifty years, ten months and two days of publication, The Herald was published for the last time as a separate newspaper on 5 October 1990. The next day, The Sun News-Pictorial published its last edition. The Sunday editions of the two newspapers, The Sunday Herald and The Sunday Sun, were also merged to form the Sunday Herald Sun. The resulting newspaper had both the size and style of The Sun News-Pictorial. Bruce Baskett, the last Editor of The Herald, was the first Editor of the Herald Sun.

Bruce Baskett is an Australian journalist who was the last editor of The Herald from 1989 until it was merged with its morning sister paper The Sun News-Pictorial in 1990. Upon the merger, Baskett was appointed the first editor of the new Herald-Sun. Although he later left The Herald and Weekly Times, Baskett continues to contribute to articles for the Herald Sun upon the deaths of old Herald, Sun, and Herald Sun colleagues.

After a progressive decline in circulation the afternoon edition was cancelled, the last edition being published on 21 December 2001. [5] The News Corp Australia-produced mX had filled part of that gap, being freely distributed of an afternoon from stands throughout the Melbourne CBD until 12 June 2015, though generally not available outside that area.

Recent editors include Peter Blunden, Simon Pristel, Phil Gardner and Bruce Guthrie. [6]

Circulation

The Herald Sun is the highest-circulating daily newspaper in Australia, with a weekday circulation of 350 thousand [2] and claimed readership of 1.26 million. [7]

According to third-party web analytics providers Alexa and SimilarWeb, Herald Sun's website is the 74th and 125th most visited in Australia respectively, as of August 2015. [8] [9] SimilarWeb rates the site as the 15th most visited news website in Australia, attracting almost 6.6 million visitors per month. [9] [10]

Collectible items

Over the years, the Herald Sun has had a range of magazines, pins and memorabilia (usually with an outside partner) that could be obtained by either getting it out of the newspaper, or using a token from the newspaper to collect or purchase the item. Items that have been a part of this scheme include:

Controversies

Greens and drugs

Shortly before the 2004 election, the Herald Sun published an article entitled "Greens back illegal drugs" (Herald Sun, 31/8/2004) written by Gerard McManus which made a number of claims about the Australian Greens based on their harm minimisation and decriminalisation policies posted on their website at the time. The Greens complained to the Australian Press Council. The text of their adjudication reads:

In the context of an approaching election, the potential damage was considerable. The actual electoral impact cannot be known but readers were seriously misled. [...] The claims made in the original article were seriously inaccurate and breached the Council's guiding principles of checking the accuracy of what is reported, taking prompt measures to counter the effects of harmfully inaccurate reporting, ensuring that the facts are not distorted, and being fair and balanced in reports on matters of public concern. [11]

Contempt for source protection

In June 2007, two Herald Sun journalists, Michael Harvey and Gerard McManus, were found guilty in the Victorian County Court of contempt of court after refusing to disclose the source of a story the pair wrote in the Herald Sun on Australian Government plans to scale back proposed veterans entitlements. The controversy resulted in agitation to change the law to introduce "shield laws" in Australia to take into consideration the journalists' code of ethics. [12]

Cartoonist's Williams caricature

Following Serena William's claim of sexist behaviour by umpire Carlos Ramos at the 2018 U.S. Open women's final, the Herald Sun's cartoonist Mark Knight drew an illustration of the match which was described as sexist and racist. In the cartoon, Williams is shown to have smashed her racket whilst a baby's dummy lays on the floor. Knight's illustration has been compared by some, including the political cartoonist and Washington Post columnist Michael Cavna, to illustrations popular during the Jim Crow era in the United States. [13] Additionally, Knight is also accused of having "whitewashed" William's opponent, Naomi Osaka, who is of Japanese descent. Following this, there was significant condemnation of both the Herald Sun and Knight for the use of this image by the author J. K. Rowling and Rev. Jesse Jackson amongst others. [14] The Herald Sun defended its decision to publish the cartoon and two days after its initial publication, the cartoon was reprinted in part along with a series of other illustrations by Knight on its front page under the caption "WELCOME TO PC WORLD" [15]

Notable journalists and columnists

Counterparts

The Sunday edition is called the Sunday Herald Sun. Its counterparts in Sydney are The Daily Telegraph and The Sunday Telegraph . In Brisbane, it is linked with The Courier-Mail and The Sunday Mail . In Adelaide, The Advertiser and Sunday Mail . In Perth, The Sunday Times . In Hobart, The Mercury and The Sunday Tasmanian . In Darwin, The Northern Territory News and Sunday Territorian .

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>The Daily Telegraph</i> (Sydney) Australian daily tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales

The Daily Telegraph is an Australian daily tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Nationwide News Limited, a division of News Corp Australia, formerly News Limited.

<i>The Sydney Morning Herald</i> newspaper published in Sydney, Australia

The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) is a daily compact newspaper in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia owned by Nine. Founded in 1831 as the Sydney Herald, the SMH is the oldest continuously published newspaper in Australia and a national online news brand. The print version of the newspaper is published six days a week.

<i>The Courier-Mail</i> daily tabloid newspaper published in Brisbane

The Courier-Mail is a daily tabloid newspaper published in Brisbane, Australia. Owned by News Corp Australia, it is published daily from Monday to Saturday in tabloid format. Its editorial offices are located at Bowen Hills, in Brisbane's inner northern suburbs, and it is printed at Murarrie, in Brisbane's eastern suburbs. It is available for purchase throughout Queensland, most regions of Northern New South Wales and parts of the Northern Territory.

<i>Northern Territory News</i>

The Northern Territory News is a morning tabloid newspaper based in Darwin, Australia. It is a subsidiary of News Corp Australia, owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. It primarily serves Darwin and the rest of the Northern Territory. It covers local, national, and world news as well as sports and business. The paper currently has a Monday to Friday readership average of 47,000, reaching an average of 55,000 on Saturdays.

<i>The New Zealand Herald</i> newspaper

The New Zealand Herald is a daily newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand, owned by New Zealand Media and Entertainment. It has the largest newspaper circulation of all newspapers in New Zealand, peaking at over 200,000 copies in 2006, although circulation of the daily Herald had declined to 115,213 copies on average by December 2017. Its main circulation area is the Auckland region. It is also delivered to much of the north of the North Island including Northland, Waikato and King Country.

The Potts was an Australian comic strip.

TheMercury is a daily newspaper, published in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, by Davies Brothers Pty Ltd, part of News Corp Australia and News Corp. The weekend issues of the paper are called Mercury on Saturday and Sunday Tasmanian. The current editor of TheMercury is Chris Jones.

<i>The Standard-Times</i> (New Bedford) newspaper in New Bedford, Massachusetts

The Standard-Times, based in New Bedford, Massachusetts, is the larger of two daily newspapers covering the South Coast of Massachusetts, along with The Herald News of Fall River.

<i>Australasian Post</i>

The Australasian Post, commonly called the Aussie Post, was Australia's longest-running weekly picture magazine.

Geoffrey Raynor Hook, better known as Jeff Hook, was an Australian artist and editorial cartoonist.

<i>The Miami News</i> daily newspaper in Miami, Florida

The Miami News was an evening newspaper in Miami, Florida. It was the media market competitor to the morning edition of the Miami Herald for most of the 20th century. The paper started publishing in May 1896 as a weekly called The Miami Metropolis. The Metropolis had become a daily paper of eight pages by 1903. On June 4, 1923, former Ohio governor James M. Cox bought the Metropolis and renamed it the Miami Daily News-Metropolis. On January 4, 1925 the newspaper became the Miami Daily News, and published its first Sunday edition.

The Morning Bulletin is a daily newspaper servicing the city of Rockhampton and the surrounding areas of Central Queensland, Australia.

The Portsmouth Herald is a seven-day daily newspaper serving greater Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Its coverage area also includes the municipalities of Greenland, New Castle, Newington and Rye, New Hampshire; and Eliot, Kittery, Kittery Point and South Berwick, Maine.

Robert Fidgeon Australian journalist

Robert Fidgeon was a television writer and critic for the Melbourne based newspaper, the Herald Sun. He wrote a regular column in the section, The Guide.

Mark Knight is an Australian cartoonist. He is currently the editorial cartoonist for the Herald Sun, a daily tabloid newspaper in Melbourne. Knight was also the last editorial cartoonist for one of the Herald Sun's joint predecessor newspapers, the afternoon broadsheet The Herald.

<i>This Week</i> (magazine)

This Week was a nationally syndicated Sunday magazine supplement that was included in American newspapers between 1935 and 1969. In the early 1950s, it accompanied 37 Sunday newspapers. A decade later, at its peak in 1963, This Week was distributed with the Sunday editions of 42 newspapers for a total circulation of 14.6 million.

Gerard McManus is an Australian journalist, magazine columnist and media consultant.

References

  1. "Herald Sun". Archived from the original on 5 July 2008.
  2. 1 2 Samios, Zoe (11 December 2017). "News Corp withdraws from newspaper circulation audit, raising new questions about future of AMAA". Mumbrella. Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 20 August 2008. Retrieved 29 April 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. Kirkpatrick, Rod. "Press Timeline 1951-2011". Australian Newspaper Plan. National Library of Australia. Archived from the original on 15 April 2016. Retrieved 13 June 2016.
  5. "Vic: Herald Sun to cancel PM edition". AAP General News (Australia). www.highbeam.com. 21 December 2001. Retrieved 21 September 2009.[ dead link ]
  6. Crook, Andrew (18 May 2009). "A short history of bossy Herald Sun headlines: Read it now!". Crikey!. Archived from the original on 22 May 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2010.
  7. "Herald Sun confirms status as Australia's No.1 newspaper with rise in latest audience figures". Herald-Sun. 17 May 2017. Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  8. "Heraldsun.com.au Site Overview". Alexa. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 2 August 2015.
  9. 1 2 "Heraldsun.com.au Analytics". SimilarWeb. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2 August 2015.
  10. "Top 50 sites in Australia for News And Media". SimilarWeb. Archived from the original on 25 August 2015. Retrieved 2 August 2015.
  11. "Adjudication No. 1270 (adjudicated February 2005) [2005] APC 3". www.austlii.edu.au. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  12. R v McManus and Harvey
  13. https://www.facebook.com/comicriffs. "An Australian artist's racist Serena Williams cartoon receives swift and international blowback". Washington Post. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  14. Davidson, Helen (11 September 2018). "'Repugnant, racist': News Corp cartoon on Serena Williams condemned". the Guardian.
  15. "Newspaper defends 'racist' Serena cartoon". 11 September 2018 via www.bbc.co.uk.
  16. "Tributes for TV expert Robert Fidgeon". news.com.au. Archived from the original on 31 May 2009. Retrieved 8 May 2018.