GameDaily

Last updated
GameDaily
Subsidiary
Fate Merged with Joystiq
Founded 1995;23 years ago (1995) (as Gigex)
San Francisco, California, U.S.
Defunct 2011 (2011)
Headquarters United States
Owner AOL
Website http://www.gamedaily.com/

GameDaily (GD) was a video game journalism website based in the United States.

Video game journalism is a branch of journalism concerned with the reporting and discussion of video games, typically based on a core "reveal–preview–review" cycle. There has been recent growth in online publications and blogs.

It was launched in 1995 by entrepreneur Mark Friedler under the name Gigex and focused on free game demo downloads. [1] The site changed its business model from a flat fee per download CDN distributed service network to an advertising-based games content portal, content syndication and vertical ad network. The site also operated business news service GameDaily Biz.

The network grew to the number one position in ComScore's Games/Gaming Information category in March 2005 and was acquired by AOL on August 16, 2006. [2] The site offered articles on different video game topics, with a lot of lists where games are ranked.

AOL software company

AOL is an American web portal and online service provider based in New York City. It is a brand marketed by Verizon Media.

In 2011, the GameDaily brand was retired. Its staff and content were merged with Joystiq , another video game website owned by AOL. [3]

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References

  1. "Partner Program". GameDaily. Retrieved 2008-10-14.
  2. "AOL acquires GameDaily". CNET. 2006-08-16. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  3. Joystiq Gobbles Up GameDaily Archived 2011-07-16 at the Wayback Machine .